How to avoid a serious tipping mistake

166 posts in this topic

 

How is this an American thing, i've never tipped a non wait staff.

 

Notice how tip jars are generally empty? Just because people try for it doesnt make it the norm or work.

 

I've rarely seen them empty, and I've lived in several cities in the U.S. Maybe the staff members pre-stuff them with their own cash to make customers feel more obligated (like it's the norm)...if so, it always worked on me, much to the horror of my German husband, lol.

 

But I have to say, at least in the U.S. cities I've lived in, the prevalence of tip jars in places like ice cream shops, carry-out joints, etc. (sometimes more creatively labeled "college fund" or "good karma") is on the rise.

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You see them alot over but its hardly the norm or expected in a way that tipping at restaraunts is. Maybe people throw a few cents in there because change is annoying, but its not like its expected of you to tip 20% of your starbucks tab.

 

Plus, their days are numbered since we aren't particularly a cash society anymore.

 

When I worked at smoothie king in high school we'd be lucky to have a dollar in ours (maybe we should have prestuffed it to guilt trip people), unless the hot girl with ginormous boobs was working in which case she'd extort more out of dirty old perverts.

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You see them alot over but its hardly the norm or expected in a way that tipping at restaraunts is. Maybe people throw a few cents in there because change is annoying, but its not like its expected of you to tip 20% of your starbucks tab.

 

Plus, their days are numbered since we aren't particularly a cash society anymore.

 

Except that now many places also have a line on your credit card receipt where you can write in a tip...just like in a restaurant. I've seen that at Starbucks, for example. So then, and again maybe it's just me, but I'd feel pretty cheap writing a big 0 or a few cents there.

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But I have to say, at least in the U.S. cities I've lived in, the prevalence of tip jars in places like ice cream shops, carry-out joints, etc. (sometimes more creatively labeled "college fund" or "good karma") is on the rise.

I was in a Cold Stone Creamery and stuffed a couple of 1's in the tip jar and the workers starting singing some weird rendition of the Scooby Doo song that went something like: "Scoopy Doopy Doop...we love scoops..."

 

I quickly offered them more money to stop singing it as fast as possible.

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I supposed i've "tipped" a stripper too.

 

Let's see. That's 650 Euros for a bottle of cheap sparkling wine, which we will drink, while you pretend that you are interested in me and that you are going to get undressed soon and then actually do nothing, then another 75 Euros for a watered down cocktail and 20 Euros for a 0,33 l beer, oh and, of course, your 75 Euro tip ... :P

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Except that now many places also have a line on your credit card receipt where you can write in a tip...just like in a restaurant. I've seen that at Starbucks, for example. So then, and again maybe it's just me, but I'd feel pretty cheap writing a big 0 or a few cents there.

 

Sucker born every minute wink.gif

 

 

Let's see. That's 650 Euros for a bottle of cheap sparkling wine, which we will drink, while you pretend that you are interested in me and that you are going to get undressed soon and then actually do nothing, then another 75 Euros for a watered down cocktail and 20 Euros for a 0,33 l beer, oh and, of course, your 75 Euro tip ... tongue.gif

 

I was referring to putting dollars in their thongs... how does that work here, im not gonna stick a 5 note in there... where do you put the change?

 

But yeah, the optional tip with the 400 lbs gorilla bouncer looking over your shoulder as you are filling it in with the offer to escort you to a cash machine for more.

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As a single person earning 8 € per hour, working a 40 hour week, that comes to a grand total of 1280 brutto. Subtract the taxes and health insurance, and they will be lucky to come home with 700 euro. Still think that is a "good salary"? I don't.

 

According to the recent "salary survey" in one of the national magazines, the average waiter income is 2k a month. Still listed as "low- paid" there of course (4/7 of the national average of 3.5k). But add on tips and having your food bills paid (not an insignificant sum) and hardly 8 Eur an hour. Yes, surprised me as well but I'll go with it, probably a better source than my anecdotal / personal evidence.

 

For most of the guys I know in my favourite haunts, a basic wage is what they get as typical student or young kids or slackers etc. Often they live at home but otherwise it funds a WG, couple of holidays, a nice life. Round my way, a lot of us customers hang out angsting about paying our bills, and the servers tell us about their weekends in NY and South American jaunts. Those staff have also worked there for years. Different life paths.

 

Personally, I see just rounding up a but normal here too. No big deal. Yes - I too took a while to get used to it but really anything else is just imposing our own cultural norm on a different culture.

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I was referring to putting dollars in their thongs... how does that work here,

 

I know. I was just playing around. The club that I went to in Frankfurt sold "dollars" for 2 Euros each.

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:lol: they weren't real dollars. That wasn't Abraham Lincoln's beard on those bills. :P

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I've never thought so much about tipping...my head's swimming with numbers and percentages now, I don't think I'll ever be able to enjoy a meal out again :(

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I was in a Cold Stone Creamery and stuffed a couple of 1's in the tip jar and the workers starting singing some weird rendition of the Scooby Doo song that went something like: "Scoopy Doopy Doop...we love scoops..."

 

I quickly offered them more money to stop singing it as fast as possible.

 

Ja, at Cold Stone, they're required to sing that song any time they get a tip, no matter how small. I was buying my little cousins some ice cream one time and threw spare change I wanted to be rid of (let's say 78 cents or something) and they assaulted us their tomfoolery. My little cousins loved it so much, I ended up having to put several more singles in (no more change) so that they would sing the song a couple more times.

 

 

they weren't real dollars. That wasn't Abraham Lincoln's beard on those bills.

 

Was it the beard of the Bearded Clam?

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Was it the beard of the Bearded Clam?

 

that was what I was trying to insinuate. ;)

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Once the wait staff finds out you're an American and you tip European style, they get pissed, as they expect an exorbitant like American tip for European style service. What's even more bizarre is that I still tip more generously than the your average local!

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Ja, at Cold Stone, they're required to sing that song any time they get a tip, no matter how small. I was buying my little cousins some ice cream one time and threw spare change I wanted to be rid of (let's say 78 cents or something) and they assaulted us their tomfoolery. My little cousins loved it so much, I ended up having to put several more singles in (no more change) so that they would sing the song a couple more times.

 

At least they have to humiliate themselves for the tip, so they are kinda like waiters in that respsect.

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Hi TT tippers,

 

Got a question for you (tho' I admit I haven't taken the time to read through here): I am organizing a big weekend event for about 40 people this weekend. Have negotiated fixed menus etc. at three different restaurants. When the venues quoted their fees, I entirely forgot to think about a tip. Now, I do NOT want to be a cheapskate, but I forgot to budget this into the per-person cost for each participant. I'm expecting meal costs of approx. €1000 for lunch, €1800 for dinner, and €1100 for brunch. I think I could tip €100, €200, and €50, respectively, for the three meals (brunch is less, 'cause they only have to get the drinks, after all).

 

How do you suppose the locals would handle this? We are Americans, so I'd like to live up to our reputation of generosity, at least somewhat.

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That makes sense now, as I was in a restaurant and said thankyou when I gave the money and never saw the change of 15 euros. It would be good to know what the normal amount to tip would be. 10%

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By the way, skipppy, here's how it's done: you check out the bill, decide how much you want to tip (can be up to 10%, or just rounded up a euro or two; I've seen both), and then hand the money to the server with an announcement of how much you are giving. For example, for a tab of €12.50, you can hand over a €20 and say "Dreizehn" (standard) or "Vierzehn" (you want to mark a certain generosity). The "Danke" then comes when s/he hands you your €6 in change.

 

But the story of the German guy who left €0.60 on a tab of €117.40 is hysterical: the guy is a definite cheapskate, even in Germany.

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