What made you leave Germany

550 posts in this topic

don_riina - I think you are brilliant the way you manage to write down your thoughts. I love reading your posts because you nearly always reflect what I feel about this place...!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Germany has a lot of good things and life is relatively easy compared with other places.

I am leaving the country in less than a year and there are 2 reasons related one to each other:

 

1. 5 months of gray cold weather

2. I am a surfer. No waves in Germany, and don't tell me "yea there are sometimes waves in the north sea" or any of that crap. They just suck big time and is COLD.

 

Back to the Baja Pacific Coast where I could ride a couple a waves at 6AM and then go to work everyday year round with only a 3mm wetsuit in winter.

- - - Nothing beats that :)

 

But I really understand people wanting to stay here, sometimes I think the need of being out at sea is a curse instead of a virtue.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

surely it depends on what is important to you. If you want to go surfing every day, then Germany is not the place. But then, that applies to most countries in northern Europe. It doesn't necessarily apply only to Germany.

 

As for finding laid-back people.. I have met lots of nice people here. They're not German for the most part. Germans have usually got their social circle already complete before we foreigners come along. There's usually just a certain number of people you can juggle in your social life. For example, my two closest friends (US and Finnish) returned to their home countries last year and it's taken me a while (until about 2 months ago) to find someone to replace them. And this someone happens to be Italian.

 

As for hearing German all the time... I work from home now and just listen to BBC Radio 4 extra all the time. HEll, we're in the age of the Internet. I can listen to French or Danish radio all day long if I wish. That's not a problem. Likewise with TV programmes. So much can be seen through the Internet, there is no need to watch the god-awful offerings of German TV. I certainly don't miss German TV at all. Then again, I didn't bother with TV in the UK either.

 

For me, books are a great pleasure and I still prefer to read in English (although I can read French and German with ease, too - but that is because of lots of practice). This is why I have settled in D'dorf in Germany rather than, say, Cologne or Duisburg. D'dorf has an English library. This too me is as important as the surf in Baja California (or wherever it was) to the other poster.

 

Figure out what the priorities are for you and then find a place that fulfils them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@don_riina: Everyone has their likes and dislikes but, all I can say about the sound of German is, it is a lot easier to hear what is being said if you are a sufferer of bad tinitus. The sharp stress on the consonants is much easier to navigate than the more flowing southern European languages. In fact, in some situations, I find it easier than my native English. It may not be very beautiful but it is sometimes very practical.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's entitled to his opinion, and let's face it what he says about drunks & druggies is not exactly unknown in the UK. I'm in no hurry to go back.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see plenty of drunks and druggies here in Germany as well. In the US we keep them in certain areas for the most part :) But, I agree on the UK being a shit hole ;P

 

Allens self hatred will serve him well in Germany. He will fit in nicely.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

He's entitled to his opinion, and let's face it what he says about drunks & druggies is not exactly unknown in the UK.

Nor are they unknown in Germany. Just cause a lot of you in that overated village down south does not diminish our myriad ghettos full of drunks and drugs like the Reeperbahn or Berlin.

 

I've never been jumped and beaten by a pack of Turks in London.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Figure out what the priorities are for you and then find a place that fulfils them.

 

I'd say that's the first bit - in theory! Most of us come here fairly randomly though (relationship, family, job, "fallen in love" with Berlin or Bavaria or the Mosel Valley or wherever). I got very, very lucky with a place the latest Rough Guide describes (rightly) as "laid-back", it's comically tolerant and open at times, but it could easily have gone wrong for me.

 

But it is still just the start. The place won't deliver what you want. You have to find it. My experience was to make a fairly focussed plan to deliver what you personally want. I am really ruthless now in cherry-picking the sort of people I want to be my mates or in general contact with - and do what it takes to get them. And indeed those I want to avoid! In the end, I always get them but it can take some time and it often means turning down the short term expedient choices (hanging with whatever EL speakers you happen to find / taking any old job / hooking up with a rescuer partner / going home to good old UK TV each night / rushing back to the UK every holiday etc). Familiarity and regularity works big time here I think - getting your face known etc.

 

I totally agree your point about support of non-EL immigrants though. I've said here before enough times that we EL-speakers do tend to under-estimate this "third population" (not-German, not EL speakers). It is very big and often well-connected and knowledgeable. I have far, far more in common with, say, a footloose and fancy-free Brazilian than most Americans or Brits working an office job or on an inter-company transfer, say. And - again that ruthless bit - they are of a lot more use to me ;) .

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think for me the 'final straw' was hidden somewhere within a bulging, strapped bundle that was slung over this camel some time during the course of the last six months. Read: All above, and other complaints.

Back broken? It certainly feels that way. Though I can't say, exactly, why... I think I feel like I'll never be free in Germany, free of the machine, but also free to be myself. Or could it be, that there's just not enough bloody ocean here?

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think I feel like I'll never be free in Germany, free of the machine, but also free to be myself.

 

That's it right there. The entire society is based on immobility and routine. It's tough for someone who values flexibility and mobility over all to accept, and once you've realized you're starting to accept it you've also just realized you're losing yourself. It'll get in your head for sure.

8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't read through the entire thread, but here's my 2 cents pursuant to the title of the thread:

 

Before offering my list, I'd only say that Germany offers a lot of good things - certainly one of the best social systems (especially if you intend to live off of it), The 3 B's: Beer, Bread, and Bahn . Beer & Bread is obvious, but Yep, the train system is as good or better than just about anywhere else. I've also noticed that service in Germany has improved dramatically in the past 10 years. It used to be impossible to get good service. Now it's much better.

 

Anyway, Germany wasn't my cup of tea for a combination of the following reasons:

 

  1. High cost of living without really being all that fabulous (Munich). Lived better in California at substantially less cost. Spain is somewhere in-between.
  2. Too much tax (and a Finanzamt with a license to extract any amount they dream up, anytime they want, for any reason)
  3. Too many rules - no matter what you do, it's wrong ...somehow - and/or you need some sort of expensive paper to make it right. Virtually all aspects of life are written into law in Germany, no matter how trivial.. Nowadays I cringe whenever I see this symbol: §
  4. Inflexible mentality - must always follow all written rules; even when idiotic, or completely irrelevant; "it's written here!".
  5. Many Germans seem to believe they have an obligation to monitor you 24/7 to ensure you precisely conform to all written rules, and immediately report any potential violations to anyone in the general vicinity, or call the police
  6. Shit weather most of the year
9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

most of the German chavs you see are probably Auslanderchavs...from Turkey, Ireland, Australia and other shitholes like that...I think also that as a gross generalisation people in warmer climates could tend to be happier...I would rather sit in the sun with nothing than in the cold...i.e spain v germany...also many spanish are uneducated so the smile often just means they're completely clueless...

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

most of the German chavs you see are probably Auslanderchavs...from Turkey, Ireland, Australia and other shitholes like that...I think also that as a gross generalisation people in warmer climates could tend to be happier...I would rather sit in the sun with nothing than in the cold...i.e spain v germany...also many spanish are uneducated so the smile often just means they're completely clueless...

 

From this post, I can tell you smile often.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now