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German or British beer?

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Right then,

 

EB's DNA check reminded me that I've had my blood tested by my doc which I advise all to do out here, as we are not suited to living in this environment. My values were okay apart from my thyroid.

 

One amazing value was my liver. I thought that given the Bavarian Morphine I have indulged in recently and got back off again onto alc-free, it'd be a bright shade of yellow or whatever, but nope my doc said it was fine.

 

So could it be that the stuff we indulge in here thanks to the Reinheitsgebot is actually relatively healthy? British beer brewed in the UK I believe must be laden with chemicals and preservatives, especially those lagers? might it be that it is the chemicals in the beer which are bad for one's health compared to Jerry beer?

 

Should I thus to promote my health, drink much more beer? Am I letting the side down by not drinking my fair share?

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I have to admit I start to feel a bit ill if I consume as american or british beer as I do german beer. I think for me the Reinheitsgebot allows me to relax in the knowledge the only toxin or chemical my liver has to really process is the alcohol. I'm not saying german beer is superior, before a bunch of people start jumping on me and beating me to a pulp, I'm just saying this is one advantage of the purity laws. Another disclaimer: I'm not saying all non german beer is full of crap and chemicals, but some are.

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Interesting question. So I wonder the following:

 

1) what other substances can one find in american/ british beer (preservatives?)

 

2) do these other substances have bad effect on liver (or other intestines)?

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How are we to know which are "Reinheit" beers then?

 

i do like that Eco beer - forgotten the name, but you can wake up slumped somewhere yet let the guilt pangs be assuaged by the thought that you are saving the planet.

 

Edit: bigfoot of you ever make your own wine or beer you will know that the use of chemicals is quite widespread, even necessary. e.g., Sodium metabisulphite is used to sterilise wort mixes before fermentation, and pectic enzyme is used to prevent jam-like clotting.

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you say those ingredients are necessary, but not in German beer?

 

I once made "my own beer" in Finland, we used one of those 2 liter containers with syrup , but it's not like making your own beer from scratch....

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Well I grow my own grapes here and get around 10 litres of wine off them. I also have hops which grow prolifically. i am sure I could use bakers yeast, but the malt part? How might one improvise here in Bayern? Any ideas anyone?

 

must be satisfying getting trounced on your own creation.

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There's a load of old bollocks talked about so called " real ale " being the best of Olde Englande and harking back to times of yore.

 

This was sadly promoted using product placement by programs such as Morse showing people sat on garden benches by a cricket square in a middle England setting whilst hearing leather striking willow.

 

The reality? Have you ever been in to CAMRA pubs? Totally run down shitholes with their dreams of days gone by fading nearly as fast as the hanging wallpaper and crappy exteriors.

 

Through a clever marketing campaign, so called real ales called the like of Old Farmer's Foreskin etc have become a mythical part of an English society that never actually existed.

 

Yes, there are some decent beers but there are an awful lot more very poor ones that are sold purely on the basis of being traditional.

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Most British real ales are more or less brewed according to the Reinheitsgebot anyway, or at least pretty closely. If your liver is healthy then that's due to general alcohol consumption and lifestyle choices, rather than avoiding the occasional additive in beer. British beer is significantly healthier than German beer for one important reason: an ale with a good flavour generally has 3.8 to 4.2% alcohol content, whereas a (German) lager needs upwards of 5.2% – and around 6% in the case of an Export/Märzen/Oktoberfest beer.

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yeah german beers brewed in germany for germany tend to follow the reinheitsgebot, infact I don't really know of an exception to this rule. If it makes you feel better some beers are starting to put a little logo on their beers signifying that it truly has been certified as a beer brewed to the reinheitsgebot.

 

As jeremy said there are a lot of things you can put in beers to make the brewing process easier. Wether it is to stabilize certain aspects of the beer, help along fermentation, clarify the beer, anti-oxidant agents. Not all of these things are bad, but not all of them are great. Take bread as an example, you can by wonderbread, and try and get through the ingredient list or you can go down to a bakers that promises proper additive free bread.

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Well I grow my own grapes here and get around 10 litres of wine off them. I also have hops which grow prolifically. i am sure I could use bakers yeast, but the malt part? How might one improvise here in Bayern? Any ideas anyone?

 

must be satisfying getting trounced on your own creation.

 

 

Jeremy Ludwigs-sudhaus has all the stuff you need to start doing a bit of homebrewing. To upgrade to all grain brewing you'd have to be willing to put a lot of time and effort into the hobby, but just to use your hops you can get a decent product with some of this stuff.

 

Just a warning about the powdered extract I don't use it and I wouldn't buy it simply because it claims to be protein free (you need a certain amount of protein in your beer.)

 

http://ludwigs-sudhaus.de/shop/category_49/Malzextrakt-Pulver.html?shop_param=cid%3D%26

 

Weyermanns liquid extract is a bit more of an affordable solution.

 

http://ludwigs-sudhaus.de/shop/category_44/Weyermann®-Malzextrakt.html?shop_param=cid%3D%26

 

Yeast

 

http://ludwigs-sudhaus.de/shop/category_5/Bierhefe-und-Hefenährmischung.html?shop_param=cid%3D%26

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Easy maths really. Big company that makes beer needs to make the beer quicker in massive quantities to make money quicker, so speeds up brewing process using additives.

 

There are no laws stating that the full ingredient list has to be on the beer packaging, so you don't know what you are gonna get in your bumper barbeque season 24 pack of Manpiss lager for 4 quid from Tesco. Probably a lucky dip selection of some of the following yummy sounding things:

 

Betaglucanase

Ammonia caramel

Sulphur dioxide

Protease

Amyloglucosidase

Propylene glycol alginate

Silicone

 

Not as bad as it sounds though - I mean "Ammonia Caramel", or even scarier if we call it "E150c", is actually about as dangerous to your body as eating some caramelised sugar and Amyloglucosidase is similar to the amylase found in your saliva, it is the stuff that makes bread taste sweet if you chew it for ages.

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Just as an interesting aside if you look up the wiki article about cobalt it actually mentions it's use as a foam stabaliser. A little incident in Canada where the brewers got a bit carried away.

 

 

In 1966, the addition of cobalt compounds to stabilize beer foam in Canada led to cardiomyopathy, which came to be known as beer drinker's cardiomyopathy.

 

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Yes, but I didn't know it was still hosted on the beeb, I got it from the wayback machine.

 

This is a fun article too

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/austria/1399166/Chemicals-in-beer-can-damage-male-fertility.html

 

All the "purity" idea gets a little blurred when they find that 8-prenylnaringenin occurs naturally in hops, and is potentially scarier than any of the added stuff.

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Well that's the thing; it's easy to scare people with nasty-sounding chemical names, but most of them are naturally occurring and completely harmless. Of course the idea of "pure" beer sounds great, but I'm getting tired of hearing its virtues being extolled by Germans simultaneously puffing away on a cigarette. If German beer is "pure", what are all these organic beers about?

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are we meant to complete the sentence where you have put "....."? Because "at quite often giving you the " would fit well.

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Don you should look up this link on 8-prenylnaringenin. It's treated as one of the magical amazing things in beer, however if you read the article they had to treat mice with dosages at about 500 times that of the amounts in beer. I suspect it's more like the story of xanthohumol (look up Weihenstephans Xanth beer), where the actual amounts discussed don't make it enough to effect your estrogen levels.

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