Will I be charged if I visit a German hospital?

89 posts in this topic

I had to do a thorough physical to get Canadian PR. It was a big deal that my blood pressure was a bit high at the time and I had to get an ECG to prove that I didn't have heart problems. I didn't need anything to get a residency permit here because I am EEA.

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I do medical laboratory testing for a living, including for STDs so my statement is hardly uninformed. I simply meant that no doctor can cure a virus or prevent someone's virus from being infectious.

 

Lord have mercy...

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Hmmmm...they didn't require me to do anything. My hubby is EU, so maybe that is why? They didn't even ask about medical that I remember (although, it could have been on the form...I don't remember).

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I lived in Germany for years without full medical insurance coverage.

....

Saved a LOT of money as I wasn't ever sick.

 

That goes for just about all of us - until something nasty turns up.

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...if you stay n the hospital, which is unlikely you pay 10 Euros a day if you have

insurance, which you don't.

Where ever you are, and if you are not to shy about aproaching the gay community; there is, at least in

Berlin a place called Man-o-meter. (gay community service) The'll give you advice what to do. You will probably have to

go to public health services, or as in Berlin, they'll send you to a Doctor they work with. You might have to

pay between 50.- and 60,- Euros cash to the doctor, but he'll check what you have and give you a prescription.

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You might have to pay between 50.- and 60,- Euros cash to the doctor, but he'll check what you have and give you a prescription.

 

If he is in Berlin, as I had previously posted, he could go there for free.

 

http://www.delatorre-stiftung.de/delatorre-stiftung.php/cat/37/title/English

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i think another one was 60 also 60 I assume it was Hepetitis. So they're not exactly cheap but they're not gonna break the bank.

 

Hence my remark Lord have mercy...

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Those quotes are from two different people, Lakey.

 

Maybe I am mistaken, but don't they prescribe a medication such as Valtrex, to help prevent future herpes outbreaks? (However, you may still be contagious. I sound like a commercial!)

 

Hopefully it is Chlamydia and can be cured with antibiotics.

 

Let's not fall into the trap of ever suggesting someone not seek treatment, because if you catch one STD, you can have more than one.

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Cheers LavendarFlower,

 

I have flu and all the medication seems to be making me woozy. Sorry!

 

I would never ever suggest that an ill human should not seek help, hence my links for free anonymous professional medical help in Germany.

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Sorry, I didn't make it clear that the HIV and TB tests were part of the process for a non-EU citizen to obtain a residence permit in 2001. I didn't need those tests just to visit.

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Hopefully it is Chlamydia and can be cured with antibiotics.

 

Chlamydia infections (throat, anus) aren't really noticable in men at all, so i doubt it's that.

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I don't know about Germany but up to about 6 years ago, some EU countries insisted on TB and HIV testing for other Europeans as a residency requirement. (And maybe still do.)

It's too sunny and I'm too lazy to go look it up but the derogations against free movement of EU citizens were I think, criminal behaviour, treasonable behaviour and communicable disease.

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Has anyone noticed that our poor OP hasn't returned since about an hour after his original post? All our helpful commentary is going to waste...

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Perhaps someone else may profit or he may return. I was not aware before that-edit (some) US-citizens or other nationalities were tested at all, concerning their health before moving to Germany.

 

A useful link, I thought.

 

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sexually-transmitted-diseases-stds/DS01123

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I was not aware before that US-citizens or other nationalities were tested at all, concerning their health before moving to Germany.

 

I've been here for three years and there was never a mention of being tested for anything, and I'm from the US. Neither were my partner nor my daughter.

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Is this the Friday thread? I see that Finx has started both his topics on Friday, though his first one was a few mins early. THis one was started on Friday. They are both sort of a bit out there. So I think Finx is just messing around.

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I've been here for three years and there was never a mention of being tested for anything, and I'm from the US. Neither were my partner nor my daughter.

 

They may have done away with that requirement in the last decade, I don't know. As I said, I had to do it in 1990 so that's way, way back. Back then they seemed quite concerned about tuberculosis.

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I think it's always been state-specific, and possibly origin-specific as well. When I came to Germany from Northern Californa in the summer of 1990, Bavaria required AIDS testing to get a residence permit, but Baden-Württemberg, where I settled initially, didn't. I went from there to Lübeck, then to Hamburg, then to Berlin, and I've never had to have any disease tests.

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Don't know whether the thread is a wind-up or not (aplogies to the OP if it's a serious question), but somehow I'm reminded of the two old geezers on the geriatric ward. One sez to the other:

 

"Oy, Reg, did you know there's a case of syphilis coming onto the ward next week?"

 

"Thank Gawd for that", says the other bloke, "I'm bloody sick of Lucozade."

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Actually, I meant that if he went to a normal doctor, got tested and the test was NEGATIVE and then he applied for health insurance, and they ask you if you've ever been tested for HIV and you say yes but it was negative, they might accept your application for health insurance but they will class you as high risk (the implication being you are likely to have sex without a condom), therefore you wouldnt be covered in the event you got HIV. Obviously if he HAS HIV when he applies, well he wouldnt be insured at all, but that's why I said having an anoymous test wouldn't make much differene if it turns out he does have HIV.

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