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Car tires and the law

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Can the lovely chaps in V-Markt say that because the tires are over 5 years old and nolonger in production then they need changing??!! We need a set of winter and summer or altenatively a set or all weather 215/60R 16 99H.

 

Thanks

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I'm not aware of any legal requirement to replace tires beyond a certain age for cars. The recommended maximum is 6 years in use and when stored properly (eg: if you change them between summer/winter), though some people say 5 years. The legal requirement is 1.6mm tread depth across 3/4 of the tread width and, if you're driving regularly you'll probably wear the tires out before 6 years are up anyway.

 

More info here --> http://blogs.edmunds.com/strategies/2008/08/your-new-tires-could-be-years-older-than-you-think.html

 

Five years is on the limit (because they'll be getting on for 6 at the end of the season) I would think, so I'd change them. They're the most important part of your car.

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Only maximum age I have found for tyres is for vehicles weighing more than 3,5 tonnes (then it's 6 years), or for tyres on a trailer with 100km/h permission (6 years again).

 

Also found some stuff about selling "tyres that were in storage for many years before being sold as new", and "advice on changing tyres every 8-10 years to avoid stuff like UV light making the composition/vulcanisation go wonky".

 

Mixed bag therefore. But of course, the best way to find out for real is to take the vehicle to TUV or Dekra and ask them

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Yes and no. There are no legal age limits on their use, provided they are in safe usable condition, until they are 10 years old. They may not be sold as new unless they have been stored according to specialist standards for no more than 5 years. However as they have the production week code imprinted on the sidewall it is a routine check item for both TÜv inspectors and Reifenfachmänner. Both the TÜV and the German tyre trade association advise a limit of 6/7 years for PKW (car) and 8/10 years for LKW (truck) tyres because of different construction and material standards. As UV light and temperature changes do affect the material (sometimes you can see cracking in the sidewall surface) even if the tread is still good the DIN norm is set on the age. They usually end up getting exported to 3rd world countries and used until they blowout.

 

If you can read German this page on the ADAC site explains all about the coding so you can verify what your V-Markt chap said.

 

Of course safe condition is a variable. The Polizei, especially in case of an accident, or TÜV inspectors may decide your tyres do not meet their opinion of safe condition. If you were involved in an accident such findings may greatly influence the settlement outcome of an insurance claim. Meaning, it's your call.

 

2B

 

Edit: Thanks to HEM (below) for those links. I've edited my post as a result of what I read there.

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Can the lovely chaps in V-Markt say that because the tires are over 5 years old and no longer in production then they need changing??!!

 

I reckon the "no longer in production" is BS.

 

The only limitation I'm aware of is for trailers that are registered for 100 kph must have tires no older than 6 years (given that the date on then is 12 mths before the trailer was delivered its a bit of a rip-off). Anyhow trailer tires "stand" thenselves to death rather than have the tread worn.

 

If you Google for reifen alt you can take your pick from the answers:

 

 

 

A quick look at the ADAC web didnt come up with an answer. Normally car tires have their tread worn before they reach a significant age...

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I have often repaired a punctured car tyre on my travels around the world, and so when I drove over a screw the other week, I purchased a Reifenreparatur Set and was about to fix it over the weekend. But I realised I've never actually done this in Europe. As we know, the Germans have a rule for everything. So does anyone know if I am legally allowed to repair the hole myself and then continue to drive around?

 

Also, what happened to the "Questions you have been afraid to ask" thread? I can't find it.

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You can find all the info here (in German):

 

https://www.bussgeldkatalog.org/reifenreparatur/

 

So, repairing tires is actually possible, when the hole is not too big and it is in the tread and not on the side of the tire.

 

But they do not recommend DIY kits because the tire would still be compromised and might be dangerous in the Autobahn.    

 

 

 

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Hmm, cheers, thanks for the info. The Autobahn bit is a good point. I've never driven particularly fast on a repaired tyre. In that case maybe I take the tyre to my mechanic and get him to take a look. The OCD in me doesn't want to buy just one new tyre.

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1 hour ago, theGman said:

The OCD in me doesn't want to buy just one new tyre.

 

You may not get the chance!

My experience with mechanics at the tyre places is that they always tell you that a repair is not possible/recommended and then say they cannot match the tyre on the other side of the axel (a legal requirement) so you must buy two new ones. Not sure how that situation pans out with respect to EC requirements for 5 year product support but I was well pissed off when a puncture in the rear tyre of my then 2 year old Triumph motorcycle resulted in the replacement of both front and rear tyres because Michelin no longer made/supplied a like for like replacement for the rear tyre.

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3 hours ago, theGman said:

Also, what happened to the "Questions you have been afraid to ask" thread? I can't find it.

 

This. What happened to it?

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1 hour ago, keith2011 said:

 

You may not get the chance!

My experience with mechanics at the tyre places is that they always tell you that a repair is not possible/recommended and then say they cannot match the tyre on the other side of the axel (a legal requirement) so you must buy two new ones. Not sure how that situation pans out with respect to EC requirements for 5 year product support but I was well pissed off when a puncture in the rear tyre of my then 2 year old Triumph motorcycle resulted in the replacement of both front and rear tyres because Michelin no longer made/supplied a like for like replacement for the rear tyre.

 

Yea that was kinda my thinking. I didn't want to bring it to a garage because either the repair will be more expensive than a new tyre or they'll give me the runaround with buying new ones. The mechanic around the corner from me is a one man shop kind of deal so hopefully I can get an honest answer from him.

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3 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

This. What happened to it?

 

I'm too afraid to ask.

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