Which cookbooks would you recommend?

40 posts in this topic

If you like it a bit more exotic, I would recommend these: http://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=71074&view=findpost&p=2242560 (#20)

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I hardly ever use cookbooks anymore, there are just too many awesome food blogs out there!

 

Have you considered some music or DVD's instead ;)

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Anything by Jamie Oliver is tasty & healthy, & get a copy of Julie Child's book on French cooking. Excellent & timeless.

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I'm not into buying DVDs and I haven't really bought many CDs in the last few years (don't listen much to radio anymore so don't really know what's good atm except for the bands I listened to 4 5 years ago). I also love looking online for recipes but sometimes I just love to curl up with a book and cookbooks for me are more worthwhile as I go back to them again and again even if I don't end up cooking something from them. Whenever I go to my boyfriend's parent's house I just go through their German cookbooks and sit infront of their fireplace.

Lots of great reccomendations, thanks!

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I just got the Nigella book Kitchen (her latest TV series)and its pretty good recipes work well and no body does food porn like Nigella. If you want a bit more advanced stuff then the Rick Stein Fish cook books have a good selection of recipes (thats if you like fish of courseA handy resoure for TV chefs is the BBC web site www.bbc.co.uk/food you can find alot of stuff here from all The TV chefs.

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Get the Silver Spoon it's amazing. I invested in this over a year ago and it's every hobby cook's dream recipe book. Thousands of recipes to choose from and well worth it for under 20 quid. Plus bloody good food ;)

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So true about cookbooks being good curl-up reading. Our first summer in Germany we were very poor, eating fried potatoes several evenings a week, and I found that reading my cookbooks was comforting and filling, and helped make up for our limited diet.

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My husband and I became vegetarians/vegans a little over a year ago. I had been trying recipes and was, like you, much more into the baking recipes than cooking ones. I figured if all else failed I could still roll up some fresh salmon with veggies and lemon and throw it in the oven, or sautee some chicken breasts over the stove and throw some spiced couscous on the side. However, going vegetarian/vegan left me stumped: what the hell was I going to eat? It was soon thereafter that we discovered numerous food blogs (my favorites are http://bankruptvegan.blogspot.com/, http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/ and anything Heidi recommends trying).

 

Without a doubt, however, the one thing that saved us was Mark Bittmann's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, which I received as a gift. That book provides the most amazingly simple things but also provides ideas for modifications and what not. Some people find his cookbooks too lame because they know how to do everything in the kitchen, and that's fine. What I realized was I knew how to do everything in a regular kitchen, but the minute I needed to make primarily veggies and grains and tofu/seitan/tempeh I was stumped. Bittmann has lots of variations on things like chickpeas, couscous, rice, and my personal favorite: homemade granola with ways to vary the ingredients and taste to suit your needs (that stuff lasts forever and you'll never want to buy museli ever again).

 

The other book we bought was "1,000 Vegan Recipes" which has been more hit-or-miss IMO. Lots of good ideas, but too many processed foods from cans and such. I recently got a smaller cookbook called How it All Vegan (bought mine at Dussmann in the English section) and so far really love it, especially the roasted veggie polenta pie and the guacamole (I've had a lot of bad and good guac living in California and this is one of the better recipes!). It lists measurements in both metric and standard English and for both this book and Bittmann (which we cook from nearly daily) I've been able to find all ingredients in German stores.

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Forget that plonker Jamie. He is a rank amateur and nothing more than a glorified pub cook.

 

Perhaps you would consider the following:

 

http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/1904943713/

 

This is a reprint. Get an original from the late 60's/70's as it has pleasing pen and ink pictures of the food. Great recipes, basically french rural cooking with some great descriptions eg (From memory) Saucisson et Pommes de Terres (excuse French spelling)..."this...is the truth".

A pretty profound cook book.

 

I also heartily recommend the following:

http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/0340912359/

 

This is basically the standard texts that Chefs read to get qualified. No names you would know from the TV here but this really is the Bible, next to a Mrs Beeton (and she is another author you should consider getting...any British restaurant worth its salt will have her on the bookshelf). The book on the link is the latest 4th edition but any of the older editions will serve you well. Not a flashy book by any means but it is fantastic in its depth and breadth, covering everything from mastering pastry, knowing your cuts of meat, translating classic French culinary terms into English, to the recipes themselves.

 

If space was not an issue, i would have Floyd and Delia alongside the above books. If you want one book that covers pretty much every eventuality, get Advanced Practical Cookery (or at least the associated "Foundation" level book)

 

After writing all that, I would say that don't feel you have to follow a recipe from a book slavishly...don't be afraid to experiment. That's half the fun of it :)

 

Taff

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Has anyone read "Cooking for Geeks" ?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Geeks-Science-Great-Hacks/dp/0596805888/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296297634&sr=1-1

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Try this http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/ and save a fortune in buying all the different Uk based TV chefs cookbooks. All Nigel Slater, Delia Smith and Rick Stein recipes are work looking up. If you fancy some real challenges, Heston Blumenthal (3michelin star) is worth a laugh!

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In my opinion there is only one cookbook, The Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook. It's an American cookbook, and thus the Brits or Germans reading this would tread warily around it, because the cuisines may be strange and the ingredients sometimes difficult to find here. But it has a lot of recipes from many cuisines, and has lots of sections dealing with the basics of cooking techniques, spices, etc. etc., and is laden with pictures of everything. It even includes a conversion table from Imperial measures to metric. If one enjoys dishes that Americans would typically eat, or wants to try out something new, I would strongly recomment the BH&G.

 

I am not a super cook, and have enjoyed reading the other entries in this thread, and would definitely consider consulting those books.

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The cookbook that has been the most welcome addition to our flat has to be River Cottage Every Day.

 

Packed with some real gems and very easy to make! Hugh has out done himself this time - a top top book!

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/River-Cottage-Every-Hugh-Fearnley-Whittingstall/dp/0747598401

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Personally I like Donna Hay Schnelle Küche mit Stil, lots of nice simple recipes split into soups/salads/meat/fish/veg/desserts in various styles, chinese, italian, thai, english that are easy to do and most importantly for me, have small lists of ingredients - in some cases the dishes only needing about five things yet taste and look delicious. Plus with some of the dishes she has alternatives at the bottom, eg. main dish might be thai red curry with chicken then at the bottom two variations on the same dish, one with prawns, one with tofu. I have found it really useful, especially when I want to save money but still eat something interesting. I've recently decided to become vegetarian and could do with a decent vegetarian cookbook. I do have a really good one that provides lots of information about food and the vegetarian diet but the recipes would be way too expensive as the lists of ingredients are enormous. Anyone know a good simple veggie cookbook that provides interesting recipes with few ingredients? Nothing too complicated though, while I'm an OK cook, I'm no blumenthal!

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I recently bought the GU Vegetarisch Das goldene von GU. That's seems to be quite a good vegetarian book, my boyfriend's parents were really impressed with it that they also bought one. It has lots of recipes and tells you approximate preparation time and easy to use (its german but I guess you are able to read german, I'm still learning but cookbook German is ok for me). I've made two recipes out of it that were simple to make and quite yummy as well. It was 20 euros, quite a good price as well. Some recipes do have many ingredients but I think they are fairly easy to get. It should be available from most bookstores so you can have a look at it.

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Personally I like Donna Hay Schnelle Küche mit Stil, lots of nice simple recipes split into soups/salads/meat/fish/veg/desserts in various styles, chinese, italian, thai, english that are easy to do and most importantly for me, have small lists of ingredient Anyone know a good simple veggie cookbook that provides interesting recipes with few ingredients? Nothing too complicated though, while I'm an OK cook, I'm no blumenthal!

 

Hi I would recommend

 

books

 

"Classic Vegetarian" by Rose Elliot

 

"Gourmet cooking without meat" - Paul Sothey

 

or

 

links

http://allrecipes.com//Recipes/everyday-cooking/quick-and-easy/quick-and-easy-vegetarian/Main.aspx

 

http://www.vegalicious.org/recipe-index.html

 

Or German books

 

Einfache vegetarische Küche. Unkompliziert und raffiniert - vegetarische Rezepte fürs ganze Jahr. Schinharl, Cornelia

 

Sehr gut vegetarisch kochen - Wrenkh Christian

 

Links:

 

http://eatsmarter.de/rezepte/s/vegetarisch.html

 

http://goccus.com/rezept_liste.php

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I swear by "The Art of Simple Cooking" by Alice Waters, another one I use a lot is "The River Cafe Cookbook" from the London restaurant and also "The Union Square Cafe Cookbook" by Danny Meyer and Michael Romano. All are very approachable and give great results.

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