Space rocket launches and ISS docking news

218 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, slammer said:

Don´t forget that the shuttle was a design from the early seventies, but it does look kind of analog.

 

Nope. The Shuttle was (partly) digital even back then.

I took part in the Shuttle Simulation Experience in 2010, a really expensive role playing game at the Kennedy Space Museum with a life size mockup of the shuttle and full cockpit. We did an entire day of training on the VMS and Unix based computer systems - green and black screens! text and primitive line graphics! core memory! three ring binders to look up the constantly changing text based context menus!

Later the entire group "flew" a much simplified  and shortened mission in the simulation to the ISS, and deployed a new module (captured by the Canadarm!) while cracking very low key jokes reminiscent of NASA humor ("just like floating a coffee can.." "Better not shake the beans...").

Flying back the Shuttle commander even had a sort of joystick for last minute intervention during landing. We actually missed the Cape due to navigation error earlier on and landed in Central Europe.

And there I cracked my final infamous joke:

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Ramstein Air Base in Germany, the only shuttle capable runway in Central Europe!"  :D

(Even the sim people didn't know that factoid. ;) )

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2 hours ago, Metall said:

 

Nope. The Shuttle was (partly) digital even back then.

I took part in the Shuttle Simulation Experience in 2010, a really expensive role playing game at the Kennedy Space Museum with a life size mockup of the shuttle and full cockpit. We did an entire day of training on the VMS and Unix based computer systems - green and black screens! text and primitive line graphics! core memory! three ring binders to look up the constantly changing text based context menus!

Later the entire group "flew" a much simplified  and shortened mission in the simulation to the ISS, and deployed a new module (captured by the Canadarm!) while cracking very low key jokes reminiscent of NASA humor ("just like floating a coffee can.." "Better not shake the beans...").

Flying back the Shuttle commander even had a sort of joystick for last minute intervention during landing. We actually missed the Cape due to navigation error earlier on and landed in Central Europe.

And there I cracked my final infamous joke:

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Ramstein Air Base in Germany, the only shuttle capable runway in Central Europe!"  :D

(Even the sim people didn't know that factoid. ;) )

I did say that it looked analog. I know that Ramstein was an emergency landing strip for the shuttle, but I also heard that Malta´s Luqa airport was also regarded to be capable.

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48 minutes ago, slammer said:

I did say that it looked analog. I know that Ramstein was an emergency landing strip for the shuttle, but I also heard that Malta´s Luqa airport was also regarded to be capable.

Actually, there were dozens of officially approved emergency landing sites around the world. That was one of the reasons for the high cost of the Shuttle: all the infrastructure!

Depending on the mission intended orbit, they would choose a few of those airports and fly equipment and personnel there, just in case. Remember that the Shuttle used hypergolic fuels that were toxic, so a normal airport assistance was not enough.

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It was running the classic 6502 processor ( SS not Dragon ) which kinda lost out to the Z80 in the late 70;s / early 80's - such fun programming that until the early hours of the night

 

The SS needs a very long airport to land at, because it just glided back to  earth, get it wrong and you had no fuel go around and try again, so you need mulitipe airports for when things went wrong, thankfully it never did.

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17 hours ago, Janx Spirit said:

SpaceX Crew Dragon compared to the Space Shuttle:

 

v4poyikde8351.jpg

 

Not sure I would like to have to use a touch screen in an emergency situation - thinking along the lines of something like what happened to Gemini 8.

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The Space Shuttle ran many of its processes on the i386 chipset.  It takes so long for the designs to be tested and approved that space flight technology is usually way behind commercial tech.

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10 hours ago, pmd said:

 

Not sure I would like to have to use a touch screen in an emergency situation - thinking along the lines of something like what happened to Gemini 8.

Hehe! Can you imagine in a stressful situation and your fingers are getting all sweaty and the screen stops responding?

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But it says here that the i386 was not produced until 1985, hang on a sec the SS first mission was in 1981

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_80386

 

I thought 6502, because i  heard it talked about, when I was watching the first launch and we were doing some training on it - I must be wrong, but I remember again them saying they had 5 of them. BUT I WAS WRONG

 

having googled a bit from here  http://www.cpushack.com/space-craft-cpu.html , they used the 8086 first and moved onto i386 later

 

 

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23 hours ago, yesterday said:

It was running the classic 6502 processor ( SS not Dragon ) which kinda lost out to the Z80 in the late 70;s / early 80's - such fun programming that until the early hours of the night

 

Wow.

Someone else is from that era too...

6502 was something I programmed back at the Uni in the early '80s.

Wasn't that in the Commodore PET ?

 

My diploma thesis / project was on a mainboard 6502.

 

28 minutes ago, yesterday said:

But it says here that the i386 was not produced until 1985, hang on a sec the SS first mission was in 1981

 

I thought 6502, because i  heard it talked about, when I was watching the first launch and we were doing some training on it - I must be wrong, but I remember again them saying they had 5 of them. BUT I WAS WRONG

 

Then went on to program the i8088 (long before the i8086) in the first job.

 

Spent a lot of time on the 8085 too...

 

Ho Hum

Tell the kids today about shifting registers and they simply won't believe you

B) 

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On 6/8/2020, 5:51:55, Metall said:

 

Nope. The Shuttle was (partly) digital even back then.

I took part in the Shuttle Simulation Experience in 2010, a really expensive role playing game at the Kennedy Space Museum with a life size mockup of the shuttle and full cockpit. We did an entire day of training on the VMS and Unix based computer systems - green and black screens! text and primitive line graphics! core memory! three ring binders to look up the constantly changing text based context menus!

Later the entire group "flew" a much simplified  and shortened mission in the simulation to the ISS, and deployed a new module (captured by the Canadarm!) while cracking very low key jokes reminiscent of NASA humor ("just like floating a coffee can.." "Better not shake the beans...").

Flying back the Shuttle commander even had a sort of joystick for last minute intervention during landing. We actually missed the Cape due to navigation error earlier on and landed in Central Europe.

And there I cracked my final infamous joke:

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Ramstein Air Base in Germany, the only shuttle capable runway in Central Europe!"  :D

(Even the sim people didn't know that factoid. ;) )

 

Hi Metall,

while I believe you heard what you heard, and they told you what you heard...

 

It is not true about Ramstein. 

 

There were several landing sites tailored for an emergency TAL (Transoceanic Abort Landing). To name some of the European ones: Spain at Moron and Zaragoza, and France at Istres. (Source: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/behindscenes/tal_sites.html )

 

Ramstein was never officially declared as a TAL site for a Space Shuttle landing. 

 

If there ever was a Space Shuttle TAL site in Germany, it was the Cologne/Bonn Airport (Source: https://www.welt.de/welt_print/regionales/article6725493/Nur-in-Koeln-Bonn-koennen-Space-Shuttles-notlanden.html )

 

The Wikipedia article on the subject is very accurate (to my best knowledge): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Space_Shuttle_landing_sites#Transoceanic_Abort_Landing_Sites

 

A google search for "Space Shuttle emergency landing Ramstein" did not yield a single hit supporting your claim. However, and that might be source of the misunderstanding: Those potential European landing sites were manned with military emergency crews sent from Ramstein during a Space Shuttle launch ( https://www.ramstein.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/304368/airmen-support-nasas-final-shuttle-launch/ ).

 

Anyway, feel free to edit the Wikipedia article and add Ramstein to it, if you think the article is wrong... :-)  
 

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I've heard about the landing strip in Spain.

The info on Ramstein as an emergency landing strip was actually talked about by members of the Armed Forces back in the day - I can't prove it, though. ;)

I just remembered, it also was on TV commentary during live coverage of early Shuttle launches, another thing I probably can't find anymore...
 

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On 9.6.2020, 10:14:22, pmd said:

 

Not sure I would like to have to use a touch screen in an emergency situation - thinking along the lines of something like what happened to Gemini 8.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_8#Emergency

I watched the SpaceX launch closely. There are handholds running under the entire width of the touchscreens - the crew can actually hang to that and still extend fingers to the screens, which they partly did. That looked really neat, immediately made me think of high spin/high G situations.

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