Vitamin D in the milk

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Unlike in Canada (and in USA I think), it seems that the milk here does not contain any added vitamin D. For a country in which seeing the sun is a rare event and which is at a higher latitude than most regions of the populated Canada, doesn't it lead to a wide-spread deficiency (at least in the winter)? Does everyone take supplements?

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You want them to add vitamin D to it? Why stop there? Why not vitamin C and all the other ones while you are at it?

 

I say: "keep your hands off my milk.".

 

We were told to give vitamin D supplements to our baby way back when. I assume this is still so.

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Why would cheese contain vitamin D if it's made of milk who doesn't contain any??

 

Milk here does contain Vitamin D, just not added Vitamin D which the OP was asking about. With the several tons of cheese consumed by each household in Germany every year, I'm sure there are no calcium deficiency issues worth worrying about. Furred arteries, perhaps, but no calcium deficiencies.

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Well, it doesn't have to be in milk, but contrary to other vitamins and minerals which you can get easily from a balanced diet, vitamin D is very difficult to get from food in sufficient quantities (you would basically have to eat salmon everyday). It's very easy to get it from the sun, but not in northern countries in winter... And you still need it as an adult!

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To PP: vitamin D is not only important for calcium absorption, it is also linked with lower risks for many types of cancer and heart diseases...

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Take a walk on a sunny day. "Problem" solved. Sea food is also an exceptional source. Fortifying milk seems unnecessary, its a symptom of the way food in the USA is produced and marketed I presume.

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It's very easy to get it from the sun, but not in northern countries in winter...

 

Sorry, but the diet of northern europeans is very high in fish that provides them with more than enough vitamin D through the short winter days I'm sure! And in summer where its light all day long they can more than make up for any remaining shortfall.

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Umm, there are UV rays even in winter and vitamin D comes from UV rays right?

 

I know I can sun my diapers even in cloudy weather so why would my skin not pick up the uv?

 

Just a thought?

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According to wikipedia (I know, I know) the average German does not get enough Vitamin D, which is probably due to a mix of lacking sunlight and not taking supplements regularly. Anywhere north of 52° latitude you will not be able to create enough vitamin D even with a lot of sun exposure because of the composition of the light. ETA: In the winter, of course.

 

The solution would be to either focus on fish, mushrooms and eggs in your diet or take a supplement. Since many Germans apparently do neither, it would probably make sense to fortify a commonly consumed product like milk to ensure a sufficient amount of vitamin D especially for children.

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UVB, but the sun is significantly weaker in the winter months due to rotation of the Earth (light has to travel through much more atmosphere before it reaches the ground). None the less I took a walk today for 2 hours and got plenty of Sun and no doubt vitamin d as well! Feels good.

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While it's true that northern (45+) climates can cause problems for vitamin D, the chances are, if you have diet including reasonable amounts of oily fish and eggs (the yolk contains the vit. D), and are getting more than 30 minutes of sun twice a week on your face and hands, you are probably not deficient in vitamin D unless you have a medical condition which inhibits the absorption.

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