What to use for porridge in Germany

40 posts in this topic

I have been looking for porridge oats for ages and was even considering trying Schmelzflocken mixed with Haferflocken. But then I saw Haferkleie at Rossmann today and it looks just like porridge! Does anyone know whether it happens to be the same?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you English? Do you really say "porridge", as in Goldilocks?

 

Isn't "porridge" the same as oatmeal?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haferkleie is oat bran. It's the outside of the oats. I don't think you can make hot cereal out of it alone. I use it for making muffins since it's a good source of soluble fibre.

 

Like Small Town Boy I use either zarte Haferflocken or kernige Haferflocken to make porridge, or oatmeal as we call it at home. You can get those kind of oats in any supermarket. How soft the porridge gets depends on how much water/milk you add and how long you cook it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make my porridge with "Vollkorn-Haferflocken (Kleinblatt)".

 

I've heard that what we call porridge, or oatmeal, is called Haferschleim here. Sounds delightful!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i order mine at the english shop cologne and many other things aswell,great service acceptable prices,quick delivery! check the web site they have english,irish and american food and drinks ps i always order online.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another vote for the Vollkorn Haferflocken here for porridge making, made even better since the local Edeka started selling Golden Syrup.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our daughter eats Haferbrai nearly every morning. A packet of Haferflocken costs about 50 cents at the Aldi.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also make mine from Haferflocken, it tastes great and yes, we call it porridge.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just use the 25 cent haferflocken, works fine for me.

 

Now I want some and maybe some toast too, mmmm, toast.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As i make it every night for a baby, i can tell you Haferschleim is like ready brek but you need to heat it in a pan and keep stirring so it gets thicker.

 

but as the others say you can make it just as easy with Haferflocken fein blatt :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, the stuff needed to make porridge is definitely Haferflocken, not Haferkleie (bran). The result after cooking is called Haferbrei or Haferschleim depending on how much water was used.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haferkleie (oat bran) tastes great as porridge. It's the only non-protein foodstuff allowed on the 100%-protein days on the Dukan diet. It's rich in fibre and has properties which can allegedly help to reduce cholesterol and diabetes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are ever in Munich then the oriental food shop down by the u-bahn entrance at Haupbahnhof sells giant cans of Quaker oats. So now every time I go to Haupbahnhof I get my oats.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the zarte Haferflocken are more like the quick-cooking oats you get in N. America. I make them for my kids in the microwave in the morning and it only takes five minute to get a nice, creamy consistency.

 

Mmm...oatmeal with (real) brown sugar on top...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i always used quaker oats to make oatmeal (we had these little ready-to-go packages). how do i make oatmeal from Haferflocken then?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The little packages are what you call instant oatmeal. It's either cut very fine or pulverized a bit so it dissolves immediately in boiling water. The other kinds of oats you have to cook a bit to soften them. For the zarte Haferflocken I use twice as much water as oats and microwave them in a large glass dish for a couple of minutes (depends on the amount). Alternately you can throw everything in a saucepan, bring to a boil and stir until they reach the desired consistency. Pinch of salt and a bit of sugar optional. I stir in milk afterwards.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now