Steamed (Plum) Pudding for Xmas

16 posts in this topic

Hello all,

 

This year, we would like to present a steamed (Plum) pudding for the Christmas feast. I must say though, I have not only never prepared this, but the last time I had it was in my childhood. I fondly remember it being rather delicious.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_pudding

 

However, I am struck by a couple of potential issues.

 

1) I do not have any steamer suitable for this pudding. (We also have no microwave) Is there an equivalent steamer that could be purchased in Germany, or should I buy one from the UK?

 

2) Having never made one myself, I was wondering if anyone has a great recipe.

 

3) Or alternatively, are there any premade brands that are any good and can be recommended. I'll be in the UK before christmas and could bring one over. maybe Marks and Spencers, or Harrods. If it's pretty good, I don't mind going this way. I guess I would still need a steamer though.

 

Thanks in advance

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Big pan, upturned cup in the bottom, place bowl of pudding on top, add water, boil for aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaages.

Your key ingredient is suet if you make one.

The Tiptree ready-made one can sometimes be found in Kaufhof, but as you haven't said where you are, it is hard to tell you where to find one. Steam in same way.

Cover any with booze and it will be nice.

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Don't bother making one yourself. If you haven't made one before, and worse still, have not even tasted one for years, it will turn out massively rubbisher than something purchased from Marks & Sparks.

Cook it like what Katrina said. Aaaaaaaaaaaaaages.

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Thanks Katrina, that's an interesting idea. I presume it's worked from experience. I will certainly consider this option and I like these MacGyver tips as a last resort ;O)

 

The aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaages part spooks me a bit, as I like a bit more precision when preparing dinner parties.

 

Wow, suet for a desert. I would never have guessed. Thanks for that tip also.

 

Actually, I'm in Frankfurt. I guess I should add that to my profile. The English shop here also does premade ones, but I am a bit worried on how good they taste before I commit to dishing it out to the whole German side of the family, including the odd aged Bavarian who is always critical of anything not German (in fact Bavarian) in food. ;O)

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That's how I cook mine - except I use an upside down ramekin.

You are best off cooking it completely through and then steaming to reheat during the meal - you can even do this in the oven after you've taken the turkey out - just use a bain-marie (roasting tin with water in it, foil over the top, lifting the bowl off the pan base as before).

 

Oh and Delia.

 

If you want to do the whole thing, buy a copy of Good Housekeeping or Delia's Christmas magazine as they do timings for everything. Precook/prep as much as you can!

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You are best off cooking it completely through and then steaming to reheat during the meal

You can even do the initial steaming a few weeks before xmas.

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Agree totally that you should just go and buy one as the standard is damn high. If you are thinking Harrods-wise, then I'll mention that Harvey Nicks' puds used to be (and presumably still are) excellent. But M&S will be absolutely fine.

 

When you buy a pre-made pud it will give you instructions on the pack for how long you need to cook it. I've already got mine, it's a 450g pud (feeds 4 easily) and the instructions on that say 'steam for 2 hours'.

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Oooh one good tip for steaming - it takes about 8hrs for a big 'un (and let's face it, that's what the ladies want) to cook from raw, you will have to top up the water so put something like a marble into the water.

As the water evaporates, the marble will make such an annoying noise that you will be forced to refill the water and not burn down your flat.

 

Not that anyone ever nearly did this. Oh no.

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Thanks for all the tips everyone.

 

@westvan, no, we don't have a crock pot, just a large pot. But I am wondering if it will be large enough as we will probably have at least 8, maybe 9 people. My wife and I rarely cook for more than 6 when having guests so this will stretch our kitchen equipment to the limit.

 

Reading everything here, I think I will explore the options of buying a pre-made one. It does sound awfully complicated, and it will be hectic enough coming up to Xmas. I must say that normally I prefer to bake our cakes myself, but time around this Xmas will be quite stretched as it is.

 

I do like the pot idea very much though. I am guessing that if a bought a pre-made says something like 2hours on the package for a proper steam cooker, the pot method would be about the same.

 

You all have such wonderful help here :o)

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Mine that says "2 hours" is for normal pot method, not steamer!

 

I put mine in a huge pot, with boiling water up to 2/3 of the height of the pud, and have it sitting on a tin lid from a jam jar. This rattles most effectively as the water gets low, like Katrina's marble principle.

It's quite easy, just drift through every 20 mins or so and top up from the kettle, takes 2 secs to do.

 

And for 8-9 people I'd get a pud twice the size of my 450g one, which feeds 4 nicely- bear in mind if its a while since you ate it; what seems like quite a mean serving, is actually mega filling.

Especially when covered in brandy butter and cream.

 

Now this thread has me really looking forward to Chrismas :)

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you can even do this in the oven after you've taken the turkey out - just use a bain-marie (roasting tin with water in it, foil over the top, lifting the bowl off the pan base as before).

NOTE: if you buy one, "repot" it or the plastic tub may melt from the residual heat in the oven.

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I normally bring one back from UK (have one from last year thats still going to be OK for this coming Christmas).

 

If you go to M&S they have 1lb, 2lb & 3lb puds. I presume if they go heavier than that it exceeds the critical mass...

Due to the high density they are quite small & can be boiled in any half decent saucepan. Dont let it go dry.

 

From M&S & elsewhere I'd suggest going for the LUXURY pud. We had the connoisseur version a few times from M&S and found it to be a bit cloying - the LUYURY was in our opinion better.

 

There were nasty rumours put about that xmas puds in hand luggage caused the explosive detectors at Manchester Airport to go off...

 

When I was a kid I used to make 6 puds together with my mother. Lot of work - not really worth the effort.

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I used to make my own puddings every year, but as my kids and German friends don't like them, I usually just buy a little one from the English shop in Frankfurt now and enjoy it myself. His stuff in the shop is good, recognised brand names, so you'll be fairly safe if you get one from there.

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Hello ovbg,

 

Every year for as long as I can remember, I have made Christmas puddings for my family. The very best recipe I have found (and used every year since I stumbled across it) is this one - http://www.cuisine.com.au/recipe/christmas-pudding

 

Admittedly, it is more effort than preparing a regular cake, but in my experience, the results are certainly delicious and very much appreciated. And the best news is that you can make the puddings right now and then store them in a cool, dark spot until Christmas Day!

 

I use two stockpots to boil the puddings - one for each of the two puddings that this recipe produces. I sit the pudding basin on a raised metal trivet (for want of a better description) inside the stockpot and fill the pot to two-thirds full with boiling water, topping up as needed during the cooking process.

 

Why don't you give home-made a go? It could become a tradition! ;-)

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