Andrew Gradon the Frankfurt Airport conman

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Another one of those "I need so many euros to get home" stories....

 

 

To those he duped, Andrew Gradon was a smartly-dressed businessman who had missed his flight and was desperate to get home.

 

When soon afterwards he asked them for their help to rebook his ticket, they gladly obliged.

 

On each occasion they gave him between 30 and 50 euros, took a yahoo email address and telephone number and wished him good luck.

Catch me if you can: Andrew Gradon has conned thousands of pounds out of unsuspecting travelers at 38 airports around the world masquerading as a stressed businessman who has missed his flight

 

Catch me if you can: Andrew Gradon has conned thousands of pounds out of unsuspecting travelers at 38 airports around the world masquerading as a stressed businessman who has missed his flight

 

The truth, however, was that Gradon, 37, was not stranded. Nor was he desperate to get home.

 

In just eight years, in 38 countries, he has conned hundreds of unsuspecting victims with the very same story, raking in £15,000 a month.

 

Despite a Europe-wide investigation led by Interpol his identity, however, has remained a mystery.

 

Here's a picture:

 

See here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1313430/Unmasked-years-run-First-picture-Airport-fraudster-Andrew-Gradon.html

post-34450-12849273799142_thumb.jpg

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I know this is the totally wrong reaction to this story, but it makes me happy that people are willing to help strangers when they are in need. I like it, obviously now this c*nt has abused all of that it devalues it a bit though.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1313430/Unmasked-years-run-First-picture-Airport-fraudster-Andrew-Gradon.html

 

Has been operating at FRA apparently

 

"To those he duped, Andrew Gradon was a smartly-dressed businessman who had missed his flight and was desperate to get home.

When soon afterwards he asked them for their help to rebook his ticket, they gladly obliged.

On each occasion they gave him between 30 and 50 euros, took a yahoo email address and telephone number and wished him good luck"

 

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Lots of people obviously feel that way - he "only" asked for smallish amounts yet still made £15k a month!

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It's nice to know that people are still willing to help each other in this day and age!

Unfortunately, you will always find a twat out there who will take advantage of it :(

Hopefully he hasn't yet realised how cloe the police are to finding him, and that he gets caught VERY soon!

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In a world full of fear about terrorism at airports I find it incredible that , according to a BBC article I read last night, they don't have video of him.

 

You'd think airports were the most video'd places on the planet?

 

Thanks for the heads up. Hopefully information like this will allow him to be caught. Would be a nice story if a TTer finally caught him.

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Sometime in between 2000-2005 he was also 'working' the Gare de Lyon in Paris.

I just recognized him now but had a long conversation with him then, and gave him soem money. :blink:

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Is this guy related to the other possibly Danish guy that conned the anarchist guy in FFM? That was for a non-existent ferry to Greenland or something, so his game wasn't as polished as this guy's, but it's the same scam, done the world over.

 

That said, how they know this dude has been doing this for eight years, has been to 38 countries, and has averaged 15,000 pounds a month -- but have just now gotten a photograph of him because he let some stranger take a photo of his passport (!) -- is very hard to believe.

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In a world full of fear about terrorism at airports I find it incredible that , according to a BBC article I read last night, they don't have video of him.

 

I wondered about this. All I can think of is that most victims don't report it to the police, and so with only a few isolated complaints over €40, it has never been deemed important enough to investigate. Working in different places in different countries seems to be the key, along with the low amount asked.

 

What seems inplausable in his story is that a well-dressed businessman wouldn't have a credit or debit card with which to pay.

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How would they know how much he's conned people out of then?

 

The whole thing seems strange but there are enough stories about him going back over enough years for it to look like you can make a pretty good life out of this scam. Wonder what other scams he has going as well?

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This is news? There are about forty of these guys working Penn Station on any given weekday. I'd just gotten off an all-nighter from Chicago and was immediately approached by a distinguished-looking gentleman wearing a suit and carrying a briefcase, who claimed to have lost his ticket and just needed $20 to get onto his next train for an important meeting, and if I'd write down my contact details he'd get the money back to me as soon as he got wherever it was he was supposed to be going. And don't you know, I almost pulled out the money and handed it to him, but something screamed "SCAM!!" and I told him no and wished him a good day. But maybe at 23 I had run into more beggars, thieves and junkies than the average bear and therefore wasn't as easily taken in by this obvious con man.

 

As if I'd needed validation (I didn't), on my way across and out of the station I saw no fewer than eight other similarly suited men pulling similar stunts with other stupid tourists.

 

IMO if you don't use your head before you peel off a couple of bills and hand them to a stranger you're not a "victim" at all.

 

 

What seems inplausable in his story is that a well-dressed businessman wouldn't have a credit or debit card with which to pay.

 

or access to an expense account, etc. Exactly.

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I do agree with that, dessa. Yet, when I blank such people, it is amazing how many (smart, capable, otherwise hardheaded) people I am with say: "how can you just do that, I'd have given him money". (My answer - they are more privileged than me - I came from what was by western background a dirt poor and troubled background and so I see that state as not unusual and something to just cope with, not something worth sympathy - and that effective and sustainable moral boundaries meant just not even trying that, it was a line not to cross).

 

One of the strange features of humanity imho is that so many people seem to spend their lives doing nothing more than being on the take and trying to con others. There's this. Last night I read about con artists on dating sites. This morning people it was using state facilities (diabled parking etc) they are not entitled to. The list is almost endless.

 

This guy (presuming that passport info genuinely relates to him) is about the same age as me and comes from the next town. Yet he's chosen to get through life in this way.

 

Humanity - particularly the privileged western group - looks pretty shabby a lot of the times.

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IMO if you don't use your head before you peel off a couple of bills and hand them to a stranger you're not a "victim" at all.

 

I think that is a bit harsh Dessa!

Let's face it, we are all concerned about gathering enough Karma to be able to enjoy a better life next time around, so it is only natural that we should want to help others.

I also tend to be one of those who can put themselves in the place of others - if I didn't have enough money for a ticket to get home I would be so fraught about it, and maybe even I would have to ask others for help - and would hope that they would help me!

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Humanity - particularly the privileged western group - looks pretty shabby a lot of the times.

 

Hardly only a western thing. And it's also hardly huge percentages of the population. Sure there are some con artists out there but I really don't think it's huge numbers.

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I used to hand out dollar bills to bums all the time, streetkids, junkies, crackheads, you name it. It wasn't until I realized that all the sympathy in the world wasn't going to do them in the long run that I stopped doing it. Nothing against giving money to people out of principle, you can just see that they're going to keep doing the same stuff as long as they have support for it.

 

But a guy in a suit making serious money off scams is too much to abide.

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The really sickening thing is that the con artists there are are almost always playing off peoples better nature or praying on the vulnerable.

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I think that is a bit harsh Dessa!Let's face it, we are all concerned about gathering enough Karma to be able to enjoy a better life next time around, so it is only natural that we should want to help others.I also tend to be one of those who can put themselves in the place of others - if I didn't have enough money for a ticket to get home I would be so fraught about it, and maybe even I would have to ask others for help - and would hope that they would help me!

 

You are of course welcome to your own opinion.

 

I don't believe in "karma". Shit happens to good people and good happens to shit people every single day. And while there is something to the idea of reincarnation, I seriously doubt if my lot in the next life will be determined by how much money I handed out to hobos under bridges. There's a whole hell of a lot more to being a quality person than that.

 

I also don't think it's harsh to not help what is an obvious con man, or even not to help someone who could actually use it. The fact is that you can only help so many people; you'll never get around to everyone and you're not a bad person because of it.

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I got done for about $US8 in San Fransisco in 1988.

 

A young black guy aged about 20-21 came up to me and told me that he had lost his train ticket and need cash to get another ticket to get home. He said that people refused to help him and felt intimidated because of his size and skin colour but that "he sure would appreciate it if I could help him." Like a fool I gave him some money.

 

A little later I told this story to someone in the youth hostel and heard that I had been taken for 8 bucks. Boy, did I feel a fool.

 

Since then I have never helped out people like that again, not even "genuine" beggars. It's a sad comment on our society but you have to learn to harden your heart otherwise you'll get taken for a ride every time.

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