German right of way laws

118 posts in this topic

So I am driving down this street enjoying the sunny day. I am traveling at about 50kph.

Suddenly this car comes bolting out of this side street, it sees that I am not slowing down and they slam on their brakes. They start yelling at me through the windscreen etc etc. I got pissed off and was waving my hands back at him. Well it turns out he was right???! If there is no sign you must always give way to a car on the right even if it is a T in the road and you are staying on the same road.

 

Crazy law! Is this true anywhere else?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is why I don't let visitors drive my car. They know not of such things.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He was probably yelling 'Rechts vor Links!' I was surprised by this as well, but I had ample warning before I got behind the wheel of a car. I'll post a link shortly with other driving rules for Germany (if I can find it again).

 

Driving in Germany - Tips and things to watch

 

EDIT: Here we go, from the US consulate website. Link Scroll down a bit and there are some general tips for driving in Germany (including right of way)

 

Stupid as it is, this may help you out. Also watch for the signs that OW mentioned (yellow diamond with white border which gives you priority at the next intersection).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its pretty much the rule throughout Europe, except in England.

Its known as the dead right rule! As they cary you off in the ambulance you cry "I had the right of way"

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah the general rule (which is total bollox if you ask me) is right before left. On roads where this is NOT the case (which is the majority :wacko: ) you will see a yellow diamond with a white border. This sign gives you priority on the road.

 

vorfahrt.gif

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

speaking of signs...does anyone know what those little round signs are that are split down the middle and have a number (30 or 60 or something on each side of the split). There are also usually two arrows on the one side and one arrow on the other side. There is also a small picture of a vehicle at the top (often a lorry but sometimes a tank!). I'll try and find a picture

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Its pretty much the rule throughout Europe, except in England.

I think its actually the rule in GB too, if the junction is unmarked. However 99.9% of junctions are (usually clearly) marked so this generally avoids confusion.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ boomtown rat - those are speed limits for military vehicles. one is for no traffic (the one with one arrow), the other (with two arrows) is for when there is traffic

 

EDIT: I think all with these questions about road signs we should start a new threas where ppl post a pic and explain or ask what they mean. there are way too many, and I'm sure that I don't know them all even though I drive almost daily...scary huh?!?!?!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the crap rule can also mean that if cars come from all directions to a junction simultaneously then you are all screwed as each has to give way to someone else! Doesn't fit very well with the otherwise generally very good rules on German roads

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

@ boomtown rat - those are speed limits for military vehicles. one is for no traffic (the one with one arrow), the other (with two arrows) is for when there is traffic

thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think its actually the rule in GB too, if the junction is unmarked. However 99.9% of junctions are (usually clearly) marked so this generally avoids confusion.

 

 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

 

not true. here is the rule for unmarked crossroads in Britian:

 

Unmarked crossroads are by definition crossroads that have no road markings or traffic signs on approach to indicate which road has the priority. The width of the roads that form the cross has no bearing and neither does the amount of parked traffic in the streets. If there is nothing to say which direction gets the priority then neither one does.

 

The safest way to use this type of junction is to assume that neither of the roads has priority. Simply pull up near the junction in an emerging fashion, prepared to give way to anything that is coming. Make sure that you look effectively in all directions before you move off again.

 

If you are involved in an accident at this type of junction then it is automatically half your fault, because if you had stopped and given way then the accident would not have happened. The same of course applies to the driver of the other vehicle.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's good that lots of people can just switch their driver's license and not have to go through the whole expensive testing procedure.

 

But now I'm starting to think a mandatory 4 hour class for newcomers wouldn't be a bad idea.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even a quick test (written) to see if newcomers know the basics wouldn't be a bad idea - you can't even switch licenses from state to state in the states without a written test.

 

I actually know of a couple who wondered why there were so many streets named "einbahnstrasse" and why people yelled when they drove down them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think it's good that lots of people can just switch their driver's license and not have to go through the whole expensive testing procedure.

 

But now I'm starting to think a mandatory 4 hour class for newcomers wouldn't be a bad idea.

 

 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

 

I think the craziest thing here (not that I am complaingin about it) is that UK drivers are allowed to drive here. Not only are the rules & signs different, but we drive on the other side of the road.. thats just asking for it.

 

Saying that, I adjusted fairly easily, but the first few days/weeks were very hazardous as you would find yourself driving on the wrong side...

 

Other than compulsory practice with an instructor, I dont see any other way than just letting us drive like they do.. A test would not help in this aspect of things. I guess I just answered my own question :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good idea on the classes, Showem, but it shouldn't need to be mandatory. It makes sense to familiarise yourself with local traffic rules. When i first arrived in Germany i spend a long time driving with a German sat next to me. He was able to explain loads of peculiarities (like having to indicate left or right when a priority road bents round but not having if you are turning off it into a non-prioriyt road that continues straight on)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe those are weight restrictions for tanks and such rather than speed limits.

 

We have this rule in North America too folks, just in a slightly saner manner... If two cars both come to a 4 way stop at the same time, the car coming from the right has the right of way.

 

BTW, it is important to remember that in ALL 30km/h zones, the rechts vor links rule applies.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I actually know of a couple who wondered why there were so many streets named "einbahnstrasse" and why people yelled when they drove down them.

 

 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

 

That street is actually the basis for one of my "early driving" stories.. I had noticed this sign around town and remembered it. Then one day I was lost and saw the same sign so thought "ahhh that must be the way home". So after 3 mins I was back where I started. It was then that I sussed the meaning of einbahnstrasse :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ DDBug - Yes, you can change licenses from state to state without a written test. I've lived in TN, SC, GA, FL, and NJ. I never had to take a test to swap licenses. Just walk in, fill out the application, read the letters from the chart, and turn in the old one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always had to take a written test - but I have never taken a driving test. :ph34r:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now