Schufa - the German credit rating system

235 posts in this topic

Exactly what YL6 said. When I was looking for a house, I had just opened a Bank account. They understood that and just asked a letter from the employer with the contract duration and salary. Even if you are a freelancer, and you already have customers booked for a significant time, a letter from them saying that they hired you for at least X years with Y amount per day will help you a lot. The best chance though are if you have permanent employment. But you do have to open an account in Germany as soon as possible.

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Thanks guys. Looks like a sublet for a while, then registering a bank account, then Schufa is the way to go. Which kind of means that it's very hard to move to Germany unless you have a friend who can recommend a sublet, nein?

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I don't know if it helps, but what we did was rent an apartment for 1,5 month in Hamburg, from here :

http://www.hamburg-lodge.de/

and I was running around doing all paper work and looking for houses. It is much more cheap than a hotel and the apartment was beautiful and had everything inside (washign machine, dryer, furniture LCD ,etc).

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Thanks guys. Looks like a sublet for a while, then registering a bank account, then Schufa is the way to go. Which kind of means that it's very hard to move to Germany unless you have a friend who can recommend a sublet, nein?

 

This is rubbish- didn't you read what I wrote? Countless people migrate into Germany and get a home very quickly on arrival. Or do you think all those people sleeping in shop doorways are homeless expatriates patiently waiting for a Schufa record?

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Reviving a long-dead thread just to ask a question about Schufa. I just checked mine online, and they have 3 addresses for me, the first of which is my company address. I never lived there (obviously), but had my post sent there when I first arrived in Germany and didn't have an apartment. It therefore looks as though I've moved 3 times in under 2 years...and to not particularly glamorous parts of town. Does anyone know if that address will affect my Schufa score? My score isn't bad, its just lower than I thought it would be considering i've never not paid a bill!

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According to the Schufa website: NO.

 

http://www.schufa.de/media/teamwebservices/wissenswertes/downloads_11/scoringinfo/schufa_infoblattbasisscore_februar2010_final.pdf

 

Fließen Daten zur Wohngegend (Geodaten) in die Berechnung von SCHUFA-Scores mit ein?

Die SCHUFA ist aufgrund ihrer umfassenden Datenbasis (positive und negative Informationen) die einzige Auskunftei, die standardmäßig mit personenbezogenen und kreditrelevanten Informationen Scores berechnen kann und auf die Nutzung von Anschriftendaten verzichtet. Auf Wunsch von Vertragspartnern können in individuellen Lösungen aber auch Anschriftendaten enthalten sein. Sie können insbesondere dann hilfreich sein, wenn wenige oder keine weiteren personenbezogenen Daten vorliegen. Wichtig zu wissen: Informationen z. B. zu Wohnvierteln mit Hinweisen auf Nationalitäten, Alter der Bewohner, Anteil von Familien, Konsumverhalten oder ähnliche soziodemografische Daten werden von der SCHUFA nicht gespeichert und fließen auch nicht in unsere Scores ein. Dies wird fälschlicherweise in der Öffentlichkeit manchmal so dargestellt, weil andere Unternehmen Informationen dieser Art zur Scoreberechnung verwenden.

 

How long have you been in Germany? My score started at around 95 and then went down a bit to around 94. This was when I had already been in Germany for about a year. Also no unpaid bills/outstanding debts. Since then it has been going up and is now at 98.18%. I have been in Germany 3 years now and in that time I have moved 4 times (within a city and between cities).

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Thanks aries6! I have been in Germany around 2 years. I don't really need the score for anything, but was just curious about it and then a little annoyed when it was lower than expected.

Good to know that apparently living in an office building hasn't harmed it.

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[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

Hi all! Rachael here, from Greater Manchester. Lived here (Frankfurt) 5 years in November. Married to a German with a 9 month old son.

 

So here is the deal, We live in a nice apartment but it only has one bedroom. We clearly need at least one bedroom more with a child and therefore need to move. The problem is that although my husband works, we don't have a spare 6-7k lying around to pay for the move, markler etc so we need to get a loan. My husband says that if we get a loan for a deposit we will get a Schufer entry and therefore nobody will want to rent to us becuase of this entry. Surely this is wrong...right? Wouldn't it just be if we had negetive entries on the Schufer, like missed payments on a loan or something, (which we don't have). Doesn't the Schufer work on a point system and therefore the score dictates whether or not ones Schufer is good or bad??

 

Unfortunately we need to take the loan before we can find a new apartment as we need to consolodate debts. My husband says normally we would find an apartment first then have the Schufer check, then take the loan, but we need to pay for car repairs and a couple of other small debts totalling about 3k. Not the world, but a lot if you don't have it. I suggested we take 10k to consolidate our debts and for a deposit but he said it wouldn't work as there would be a Schufer entry before we find an apartment, he said nobody renting out an apartment would consider us because of this.

 

Heyulp!

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Put yourself on the landlord shoes... a tenant with a debt is worst than a tenant without a debt.

 

Like your husband says, find a new apartment to rent and after ask for the loan...

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Having an entry regarding a loan in Schufa is not necessarilly a negative thing. Having credit and having a record of being able to pay for it is what Schufa is all about. I have more than a million Euros of registered debt in Schufa, but still have a rating of 99.6% against my score, because I've never defaulted on a payment. A potential landlord can't see your loan detail (unless you show it to him) but only your score which is essentially a rating of how good you are at paying your bills and therefore most important to him. It would be a good idea now to get a Schufa report to see what is actually registered in your records, and what your score currently is. If any loan you take out is manageable compared to your total income, and taking into account the rent you will have to pay I can't see any problem.

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BRILLIANT!! Thanks YorkshireLad!! (My dads from Yorkshire :D )

 

I had a lot of trouble trying to clarify this with my husband (Germans can be so pig headed sometimes!) It just didn't make sence to me that taking out a loan to pay for a deposit on an apartment or house would hinder our chances of actually renting somewhere. How many young families have 6k lying around...not many ill bet!

 

You have answered my question! Thank you thank you thank you!!!

 

All the best and the kindest of regards,

 

Rachael :)

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So, I got my Schufa statement a week after I opened my German bank account. I doubt it says much. But, I got three pages of it. Not sure which one do I need to submit when applying for apartments? Two are letter like pages addressed to me, and one is more like a statement. Do I copy all three or just one? Which one? :)

Many thanks

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Twixmix: I don´t know what´s in your statement but I hope it says " ausschließlich positive Vertragsinformationen " and nothing in red!

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Bump again.

 

Is there some public/official info available on how you can optimize your SCHUFA (as a person responsible with his/her finances) to get better cards, rates or mortgages in the end or all is it a wild guess like FICO in the US?

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I don't think so.

 

But in general the following, common sense things should help your schufa score:

 

Pay all your bills on time

In case you have taken out a loan, make sure you make the monthly payments

Avoid applying for credit too frequently

Avoid changing jobs too frequently

Avoid changing your primary home address too frequently

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According to the information on the schufa website, where you live and other sociodemographic data, like age and nationality, does not affect your schufa score, but who really knows.

 

See post 146.

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  • Pay all your bills on time - only relevant to Schufa if you get a legal demand for payment from a court - this can be a long time after payment was due.
  • In case you have taken out a loan, make sure you make the monthly payments - ditto
  • Avoid applying for credit too frequently - has a minor effect on Schufa, but worse if you fail to repay
  • Avoid changing jobs too frequently - no effect on Schufa
  • Avoid changing your primary home address too frequently - should not have an effect on Schufa, but a moot point

 

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OK. You're correct about the last two points, that it doesn't have an effect on Schufa. I put that in because my home bank (commerzbank), or rather it's computer system, denied me a personal loan because I had been at my new job and apartment for "only" 8 months.

 

So changing jobs or addresses too frequently would not have an effect on the schufa score, but it might affect your ability to get a loan, irrespective of your schufa score. Mine was >97. I managed to get a loan approval from Postbank (via smava) after the denial from commerzbank.

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