How to find an apartment or room in Munich

141 posts in this topic

You really should consider going to a relocation agency. Apart from the language convenience, they are in regular contact with many immobilien and are at the front of the queue when good property comes on the market, as many immobilien distribute their lists to the relocation folks before they start to publically advertise. Immobilien prefer the Relo companies becasue the pre-qualify the client, and there is less of an issue with money. Not only does the Relo agent help with the finding of the property they deal with the pitfalls in securing and moving in to it. Costs money, true, but saves problems later. Because of the predominance of Ex-pats in the Starnberg area due to the presence of MIS the relocation companies have quite a strangle-hold in this area...

 

YL6

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Thanks for the advice.

 

I have no problem with approaching a relo agent. How much should I expect them to charge? So far, it sounds like the Kaution is about 3 times rent, the immobilien charge about 2.2 times rent to provide the property, and so the relo will be some multiple of the rent on top of that?

 

Think I need to get into property management in Germany - somebody must be raking in a fortune!

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Most Relo companies either charge according to time consumed in working for you or offer a series of packages such as "House Finding", "Familiarisation", "Paperwork" or whatever... RAA advertise here, or alternatively try Swift Relocation who are in the south of Munich and therefore more familiar with Starnberg.

 

Important: If talking to a Relo company ask if they or any of their staff are ex-pats or have had experience of relocation themselves. In my opinion, if you've not experienced it you should not be advising on it.

 

YL6

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Immocenter.Sueddeutsche is a great place to look - but the ads are in German (the big explanation thread should help though). I did a first look and there are 92 places listed which have 2+ bedrooms, balcony and parking, the range is about 750-2000€/month warm. So a big range.

Is you company willing to pay any relocation costs at all?

Because it's a big thing to move a family without support.

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Hi there,

 

I am looking for a rental apartment in Munich, and have been using the Süddeutsche Zeiting (online) so far. Most apartments listed there have Provision included which I would like to avoid. I will get the Kurz und Fündig this week, but would like to use the internet as it generally has more information provided up front.

 

Can anyone recommend any other trustworthy internet sites that I could try out? I found one which required you to pay 70 Euro upfront and they would send weekly emails listing flats matching my search criteria, but was unsure if it was safe to use. Any help would be appreciated!!!

 

Thanks in advance!

 

DE

 

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Somebody posted a warning earlier to the effect that the "€70" site you mention - or a similar one - is a scam because the listings they send you consist of ads already published elsewhere...

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I would have to back up the recomendation to look in the second floor pin board at the Goethe Institut in Sonnenstrasse. THose adverts are made for lost foreigners who need a place to stay between one month or forever.

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For new comers to Germany the rent regulations (deposit fee's final cleaning painting etc) can be pretty daunting. One mistake that most people seem to make and surprisingly has not been mentioned in this forum before is when taking short term furnished accommodations, is that people pay a deposit and sign a contract agreeing to paint when they leave. THIS IS TOTAL AND COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY, its only purpose is to enrich the landlord by ensure when you leave in a few months time he gets to renovate at your expense. I have been on the road for almost 5 years through out Europe and for the most part stay in short term furnished accommodations (including almost 2 years in Munich) and I have never paid a deposit or signed a contract. I have on occasion had to pay a small cleaning fee (nothing near what Mr. Lodge charges) of perhaps 50 or 75 euros but never more.

 

The reason is simple, the landlord is receiving at least 100% above what he could rent the apartment for, throw in some old bed, some moth eaten couch, a TV that hardly works and Viola your in the business of short term lets.

 

I did look at one place where the landlord wanted a contract but I stated no deposit (letter from company in lue of) no painting at the end and no notice to move. he was being offered 1200 a month for an apartment that would normally rent for 700 so I wasn't willing to do any extra. We ended finding another place that required none of the above.

 

Let me repeat this. When renting short term accommodations DO NOT LEAVE A DEPOSIT OR SIGN A CONTRACT AGREEING TO PAINT AT THE END! Its not neccescary. if the landlord insists on you doing go somewhere else.

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One doesn’t have to be in Germany very long to realize that when it comes to renting Germans do it very differently than the rest of the world. This isn’t meant to be a definite guide to renting in Germany but rather some tips and tricks to avoid major hassle and expense when moving out.

 

A few important tips

 

First off you will be required to sign a rental agreement and put up to 3 months deposit. Sometimes you may have to pay a fee to an agency (Makler) up to 2 months plus VAT.

 

Kaution (deposit) the rent deposit goes into a special bank account which requires both signatures. This has to be done at the bank. Other wise the money goes into his pocket and you have limited legal recourse at the end if you disagree repair and cleaning costs. This is the kind of thing a dodgy landlord will try to get away with.

 

Secondly you will be usually given a choice of painting now or when you leave. Always always ask to leave the place unpainted. If you agree to paint it when you leave it has to be the landlords satisfaction, which means if you paint it and he doesn’t like it he brings in the professionals and bills it to you. You will also have a harder time fighting damages.

 

Make note of any problems (scratches on floor etc) this must be noted in the contract.

 

For those who are being relocated by youir company make sure that the contract is in the company name and not yours, this means they are responsible for the deposit and closing down the place when you move. Means less hassle when you leave.

 

Legal insurance may seem like a waste of money but in Germany you need it. Alternatively you can join the Renters association. This is cheaper and just as good but you will need good German skills

 

How to do everything wrong and really really hate living in Germany

 

This is what happen to a couple form Britboard. They were relocated from America to Germany, they rented a large older empty house from a co-worker. Heating was by propane and were told it would cost about 1000 a year. They also paid the kaution out of their pocket rather than having the company pay it or provide a letter.The actual heating costs turned out to be much higher than that, so much so that they were forced to move. After moving they fought with landlord over getting the rent deposit back, after getting lawyer involved (at their expense) they finally received a letter telling them of all the damage down and why they would get no money back. Because the money wasn’t placed into a special account they had a hard time fighting it.

 

What they did wrong, well just about everything

 

1. They should have asked to have the contract in the company name.

2. The kaution (rent deposit) went into the landlords bank account instead of a joint account, this left them with little legal recourse to fight it.

3. The problems with the floor should have been noted in the contract.

4. When it became apparent that the heating costs were way out of line they should have contacted a lawyer (specializing in renters) and brought along a translator. The lawyer then draws up a letter explain that the heating costs are out of line and they will not be paying the rent until this issue is settled. At this point the landlord contacts his lawyer and they send loads of letters back and forth, a court date is set and then the judge rules on who is right. Generally speaking Judges look kindly upon poor tenants, worse case scenario you have to pay the rent. In this instance most people felt that the heating costs were so far out of line that the landlord would have been held responsible for part of the costs.

5. When the landlord refuse to return the rent deposit contact a lawyer and if he still refuse to return it or disputes damages or dosen’t give you an itemized bill for repairs it will mean going to court. This happen to a friend of mine and it cost the land lord 12.000 DM.

 

Important note on Short Term Lets (furnished apartments)

 

Munich seems to be a bit unusual in that many landlords require you to sign a contract and post a deposit. If your coming over from America I highly suggest you let you company handle it. If you run into problems it will be very difficult to follow up on.

 

Secondly if possible try and find a place that requires neither, it can be done, I have never paid a deposit or signed a contract for short term housing.

 

If you do have to sign a contract make sure the condition of the place is clearly marked, you don’t have to note every scratch or stain, but the more detail you can provide the better. It would be sufficient to note that there are stains on the carpet (so you don’t have to steam clean it two months latter) and stains scratches on the wall, and that the couch is old and tired out. Oven is dirty etc. Basically you want to make sure you only have to worry about a final cleaning when you leave and not repainting the whole place. Also be careful about notice so you don’t get stuck paying for empty place. It seems like a real pain to do this when you may only be in the place for 2-3 months but its the only way to protect your self against dodgy landlords.

 

Important note on Telephone and DSL

 

Its not that common to find places in Munich with telephone and Internet. If your place doesn’t have it, I don’t recommend setting up your self. It is very expensive to do. Best bet is to find a place with telephone and Internet and ask them to turn the phone on against a deposit (100 to 200 euros is quite reasonable) or as an alternative have them install it and you pay extra per month, but the line rental is in the landlords name not yours. Either that or get a laptop with wireless and find a local free hot spot.

 

Important Note: if you have updated information or corrections please PM me rather than posting a reply and I will have editor Bob or Bill or Joe or whom ever correct it, this way someone doesn’t have to read through 25 posts to find updated info.

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Legal insurance offered by Renters Association (Mieterverein) does not cover complaints and disputes originated within 3 months period after membership start.

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Websites for finding accommodation in Munich, ...no agencies

 

Does anyone know where I can offer my Thalkirchener (München) flat to rent on the www?

Of course additional to Toytown Germany!

 

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Well there is craigslist which a lot of Americans use outside of Germany. This would be handy especially if it is a short term rental you are looking for.

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Hello!

if you are looking for an accommodation for some days, you can also have a look at: www.bedandbreakfast-zeevat.de. There are rooms with breakfast included and no feeling that you are not in your house.

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I am a student coming to Munich from the US for a 6 month internship.

I need cheap and safe accommodation. Any suggestions please? Unfortunately, I dont know German and thus having difficulty in negotiating most of the sites mentioned.

Thanks!

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thanks to TT,

so i am moving to Munich soon, end of march, this website - tt, has proved invaluable, sincerely.

I managed to locate a flat using http://www.quoka.de/.

No agency fees either. they seem very expensive.

Arranged all over internet and phone (had a colleague go and see the flat for me on my behalf)

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If I can ask a naive question:

 

Many of these apartment services list the provision as being, say 50% plus 19% tax. Is the 19% calculated from the 50% provision, or is it 19% of the entire bill (i.e. you'd have to pay an additional 19% every month)?

 

Thanks so much!

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Hmm I don't know where you got the 50% from, but usually the provision would be the equivalent to 2 months of rent plus the 19% of that amount which is the VAT (mehrwersteuer) that the agent would have to pay to the government for selling you a service.

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