Can American beer make it in Germany?

183 posts in this topic

 

The beer mentioned in the article, for one.

 

But then, I'm guessing you didn't bother to read the article, did you?

 

You mean that beer being made here in Europe?

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Will American beer take off in Germany? Well it stands a better chance than British beer, even though British beer is fucking ace, one of the things the Yanks are great at is marketing, so regardless of how good the product actually is it still ends up being saleable ;)

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What Stone is proposing is to build a brewery in Europe. As such it would be American beer, but made in country X with country X workers. Maybe in Germany, maybe not. I assume they would like some govt handouts in exchange for building a brewery and providing new jobs etc. I think though that there are already too many breweries in Germany/Europe clamoring for an ever smaller pie, and it'd be better to simply contract out the brew. Of course they are visionaries and they could make it work.

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But Porter is a British style beer so surely brewing it in another country just leaves it at being a Porter and nationality doesn't really matter?

 

Getting nationalistic about beer is fucking stupid. Just enjoy it.

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OP talked about Danish beer. Danish breweries are selling quite well in Germany. Acutally about 30% of the Danish beer is sold in Germany.

 

But 99% of it is bought by Danes just south of the border and re-imported into Denmark. By truck to Germany, by trunk and trailer back home ...

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Which American beer isn't a pilsner?

 

 

When i worked in the Seattle area for most of the 1990s, drinking a "macro brew" e.g. Bud, Coors, Miller, etc. was pretty much "uncool". I had the impression that most yuppies drank microbrews almost exclusively.

 

Sierra Nevada, one of my favorites, was already mentioned. One of many local breweries in the Seattle area was called Red Hook and they offered an Ale, an Indian Pale Ale, a Blond, a Bock, and a Stout which was mixed with Starbucks coffee. There were more microbreweries in Portland and Eugene than I can count.

 

I lived in the midwestern US during 2004-05 for about 15 months. Every medium sized town in Michigan and Wisconsin seems to have a handful of microbreweries. The local, standard grocery store where my parents live in a mid sized city in Michigan sold Pilsner Urquelle in 2008.

 

The idea that the American beer market is limited to a handful of large breweries which make watered down pilsner has been outdated for roughly 20 years.

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Show me the German who doesn't like Czech beer (okay they probably exist, but I haven't met one yet). They have the quality, the distribution netwrok and they sell well. The US beers might be good, but the companies need to spend effort to develop a market. I guess there are easier markets to penetrate than Germany, so they don't do it.

 

The point is, you need to have the price, the freshness and the taste. The market is way to tough to make it if you're lacking in one of them.

 

I mean, a typical German pub has two, three brands on tab. (Makes a lot of sense. The "500 brands of beer" pubs are just for posers.) If they have the choice of making one of the brands a rather good beer from round the corner or an interesting brand from Seattle which spent a few months until it got to the pub, needing special treatment to be able to travel and simply losing taste while getting older, the choice is rather simple, isn't it?

 

Beer is food, and as most foods it's better when fresh. I prefer a mediocre brand fresh from the tab to any 6-month old bottle of a premium brand. So as long as the best US beer isn't able to get its beer to a pub round the corner as fast as a Germany brewery, they have probably lost, no matter how good it tastes somewhere in Wisconsin, 600 metres away from the brewery.

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And besides...two World Cups in a row saw American beers being blocked from advertising and exclusive distribution rights here in Germany. The American beer blocked was replaced by a German Pils.

 

Due to protests after the first test runs at the Fedweration cup. I drank that sorry excuse for a beer at one of the games and I can only say that it was ridiculously bad. Tatstes might differ, but for my taste buds it was just a awful. Even worse than Heineken.

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When i worked in the Seattle area for most of the 1990s, drinking a "macro brew" e.g. Bud, Coors, Miller, etc. was pretty much "uncool". I had the impression that most yuppies drank microbrews almost exclusively.

 

Sierra Nevada, one of my favorites, was already mentioned. One of many local breweries in the Seattle area was called Red Hook and they offered an Ale, an Indian Pale Ale, a Blond, a Bock, and a Stout which was mixed with Starbucks coffee. There were more microbreweries in Portland and Eugene than I can count.

 

I lived in the midwestern US during 2004-05 for about 15 months. Every medium sized town in Michigan and Wisconsin seems to have a handful of microbreweries. The local, standard grocery store where my parents live in a mid sized city in Michigan sold Pilsner Urquelle in 2008.

 

The idea that the American beer market is limited to a handful of large breweries which make watered down pilsner has been outdated for roughly 20 years.

 

 

Sierra Nevada is hardly a "micro" brew.

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I can imagine american brews only being popular with those that wish to emulate american culture.

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Germany has it's fair share if "Piss-ner" beers as well...and that's all "American" beers are is a normal, run-of-the-mill Pils.

 

You have not the remotest idea of what you are talking about.

 

 

Personally, I've yet to drink a beer (American, German, English, etc) that actually tasted good.

 

Maybe you just don't like beer. Although my normal response to people who say they don't like beer is "What, none of them?".

 

 

well, if American beer this way comes, I hope they plan to add some alcohol to it. Last time I had one, it tasted really weak.

 

Alcohol content is largely irrelevant. A top-fermenting 3.8% ale has more flavour than most 5% bottom-fermenting lagers. If you're going to generalise the entire American brewing industry based on the sampling of one single beer, then at least name which one it was.

 

 

Show me the German who doesn't like Czech beer

 

That's because most German beer is Pilsner, which comes from...

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Hondo:

 

It's no mystery. US military bases overseas are but an extension of the US domestic market.

 

Of course they're going to sell more US beer than German - it keeps them greenbacks within the US economy.

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I would like to say that as a non-German that wants live in Germany I admire that Germans have an affinity for things that are higher quality and strive to achieve it in an efficient manner. It is apparent in their simple products beer, food, meat and definitely in their finer goods cars, equipment etc.

 

American beer is another cheap imitation of lager and pilsner but they do have jack daniel's whiskey which is not bad...

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A walk down the beer isle of any UK supermarket or a good liqcour store in the US would quickly demostrate that, at least as far as beer is concerned , that's complete and utter unmitigated bollox.

 

You mixed two points of my posts together that had absolutely nothing to do with one another. Go back and look. When I said "The same could be said for the English and Americans", it was in response (obviously...I even quoted in my previous post) to the following quote:

 

Germans also have what is almost a genetic characteristic and that is a belief that anything German is far superior to anything non-German. In some cases they may be right but they believe it about EVERYTHING.

 

The only other things I said were that not all US beers are pilsner, and that I have yet to find a beer (from the places I mentioned) that I liked. Not sure how walking through a good liquor store in the US or a UK supermarket would demonstrate that any of that is "complete and utter unmitigated bollox". It's simply opinion.

 

By mixing my quotes together, you made it seem as if I said most US and UK beers are pilsner. I did not say that. I said that most US beers a pilsner, but not all are.

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American beer will never gain a foothold in any European county. First of all the only breweries that could make a stab at a foreign market are the mega breweries. There is a reason why one drinks American beer ice cold,It kills the taste. Also micro breweries are doing quite well in local markets. I went to a football game in Buffalo New York and a few guys from Canada were selling Canadian beer out of their truck, in the parking lot. By the time I got there they sold out.

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Maybe you just don't like beer. Although my normal response to people who say they don't like beer is "What, none of them?".

 

That's probably it honestly. I'm not a big alcohol/liquor person. There are a few beers that I can tolerate (they tend to be pilsner), but for the most part I just do not drink beer. If I'm going to drink, I'd rather drink liquor.

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You mixed two points of my posts together that had absolutely nothing to do with one another. Go back and look. When I said "The same could be said for the English and Americans", it was in response (obviously...I even quoted in my previous post) to the following quote:

 

The only other things I said were that not all US beers are pilsner, and that I have yet to find a beer (from the places I mentioned) that I liked. Not sure how walking through a good liquor store in the US or a UK supermarket would demonstrate that any of that is "complete and utter unmitigated bollox". It's simply opinion.

 

By mixing my quotes together, you made it seem as if I said most US and UK beers are pilsner. I did not say that. I said that most US beers a pilsner, but not all are.

 

 

Er , wrong. Go into a German establishment and you get German beer. Indeed usually almost always the beer of the region. In the US and UK you get beer from all over the world because both cultures have a far more open attitude to beer and people seem to like trying different types of beer.

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Not wrong at all. Sorry but you cannot deny what I said in reference to the US. You're arguing about "openness to different beers", something I NEVER talked about in any of my posts. The majority of American beers are indeed pilsner. There are some non-pilsner US beers, but the American pilsner ones outsell the others (and the few foreign beers) by a milestone. There are indeed some foreign beers in the US (almost always produced here), but it depends on the type of bar/store and the area you are in. I couldn't find one bar, supermarket, or liquor store in the city I live in that has a real "selection" of foreign beers. Becks, Heineken, and Corona are generally as foreign as you are going to get in a bar or store here. If I asked everyone I know which kind of beer they drink, I guarantee an overwhelming majority of them would mention an American beer and admit to not really trying any foreign beers. Most of the ones who have tried a foreign beer will probably tell you that American ones are much better. In a bigger city I would definitely have a chance to find a good selection of foreign beers, but in an average-size/smaller city? Not really.

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