Frosted and then defrosted beer

60 posts in this topic

Hmm, well I'm still referring to the dreck they drink over here while talking about weak American beer, which is 4.1% here or 4.2 or 4.3 in Ireland and England so my point stands.

 

I also question wiki in that because we had guinness at the bar I bartended at in US and I remember the labels saying it was weaker than Budwesier when we had this debate when I was behind the bar, but I could be mistaken.

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I find the comment that Guinness is flavorless very interesting. Although by no means would I say Guinness is the best beer in the world I have always found it to be quite nice, having a nice complex flavor. It does after all have enough complexity to mask the fact that it has 2,5 times the bittering units of your standard helles. The complexity I find comes from the mixture of roasted notes (coming from both roasted barley and malt.) The more defined mouthfeel given by oats and nice acidic flavours. All this combined in balance with a good malt backbone and bitterness to match the beer. I'm actually surprised they have managed market such a beer to the mass markets.

 

With american lagers/light lagers, it isn't really chemicals that bring the lack of flavor it's lack of malt. They use corn and rice as adjuncts to cheaply raise the alcohol content of a beer. Because neither corn nor rice have to be malted for the starch to become available to be broken down, they lack the complexity (among other reasons) that malts do to give the flavor we associate with beer. This combined with a distinct aversion to hops adds to overall lack of flavor. It doesn't mean that the beers are loaded with chemicals (although they probably are), it's just a usage of non malt adjuncts to cheaply raise the alcohol in a beer.

 

As to the original posters question, I would simply try the beer unless the glass has been broken. The colder the beer the more CO2 stays in solution so you shouldn't have lost too much Carbonation, however the expanding of the beer as it got closer to or even at the freezing point would cause an expansion of the contents of the bottle which increases the pressure, which is why the seal on your cap was compromised. I would probably drink it fairly quickly if you decide to drink it.

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I find the comment that Guinness is flavorless very interesting. Although by no means would I say Guinness is the best beer in the world I have always found it to be quite nice, having a nice complex flavor. It does after all have enough complexity to mask the fact that it has 2,5 times the bittering units of your standard helles. The complexity I find comes from the mixture of roasted notes (coming from both roasted barley and malt.) The more defined mouthfeel given by oats and nice acidic flavours. All this combined in balance with a good malt backbone and bitterness to match the beer. I'm actually surprised they have managed market such a beer to the mass markets.

 

Thats a lot of words to describe the adjective "tasteless" :)

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not sure if I would describe Guiness as tasteless...no beer...that's tasteless...

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Natty was the normal keg beer in the broke ass college parties (unless you "upgrade" to bud light, but honestly after 6 or 7 who cares, right?).

 

I remember keystone light tallboys too since they were like 2.50 for a 6 pack.

 

 

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SUPER post! So why didn't the German brewers in Milwaukee continue the tradition? Bud in America is nothing like the Budweiser from the Czech Republic. What happened`? Alcohol strength is really not the issue here. Rotgut should beer not be. Only a pleasant drinking experience.

Whem I was back in the UK last year, I found a few beers in pubs which were from local breweries which were proud to advertise their alcohol content over 9%

Not beer in my opinion.

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Bud in America is nothing like the Budweiser from the Czech Republic. What happened`?

 

What do you mean "What happened?", Anhueser Busch and Budvar are separate breweries and were never the same. They just happen to share the name.

 

Not sure what Czech beer has to do with German brewers in Milwaukee though.

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Similar discussion at the perennial thread Freezing point of beer. We have a refrigerator for takeaway beer bottles, cools the air inside down to -5C. I check every morning and there are occasional frozen beers (maybe 2 for every 150) - frozen geyser from the top. I remove those bottles, let them warm, wash the outside, and then bring them home after work. Beers always taste aok!! Actually perfect except for a little less carbonation. Really! I would recommend drinking them within a day or two as they have been open to the atmosphere. It would be a pity to throw them away. :o

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@jmj well they do have less carbonation, and they certainly don't go pshht when you open them, but they still have a nice head upon pouring them. I make sure they're served cold.

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What do you mean "What happened?", Anhueser Busch and Budvar are separate breweries and were never the same. They just happen to share the name.

 

Not sure what Czech beer has to do with German brewers in Milwaukee though.

 

"happen to share the name"? that's an awfully kind interpretation of what AB did...

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The founders of American Budweiser didn't really "do" anything other than name their beer after the part of the world whose style they were basing their beer on. The Budvar brewery in the Czech Republic didn't exist when Budweiser was launched onto the American market, although there were other breweries in Budweis that used the -er ending to show where the beer came from. Only one still exists, and it ain't Budvar.

 

The mass-produced beers in America, and indeed those in almost every country in the world including Germany, don't generally taste awful – they've got too much brewing knowledge for that. What's happened is that they've simply removed any strongly identifiable flavours from their beers in order to appeal to as broad a section of the population as possible. That mediocrity rules is hardly unique to the brewing industry – virtually the entire food and drink industry operates on the same basis.

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"happen to share the name"? that's an awfully kind interpretation of what AB did...

 

What was that, name their product after a town in Bohemia?

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"they've simply removed any strongly identifiable flavours from their beers in order to appeal to as broad a section of the population as possible"

 

How awful! I don't think the American public can be aware of this. Maybe it also explains why all the cheese is similarly tastless.

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How awful! I don't think the American public can be aware of this. Maybe it also explains why all the cheese is similarly tastless.

 

The American Public is indeed aware of it. It is one of the factors for the rising sales of Craft Beer. While AB/Miller/Coors all posted losses in beer volume sales, craft beer has continued to post gains (7% last year). Craft beer offers a flavorful, often locally produced alternative. The days of mass produced beer being the only choice are long over. It is true that in other countries - even Germany - mergers and therefore less variety are on the increase (although I also maintain that that fact creates opportunities for breweries brave enough to try being different), in the US at least, the trend has been towards more variety and has been so for a long time. It pains me to say this as a German trained brewer but US Beer culture is more vibrant than that in Germany. What does this have to do with defrosted beer? Sorry, I just can't resist letting people know that there's more to US beer than AB/Coors/Miller etc.

 

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In fact imitation is the best form of flattery, and the major brewers now all produce a range of interesting beers, marketed under a different brand name so that you think you are indeed buying a locally produced craft beer.

 

In other news, Guinness was the greatest advertising triumph of the 20th century, succeeding in making lager drinkers who wouldn't dream of touching real ale spend extra money on almost the darkest, bitterest ale there is; and at 65 cents a bottle, who cares whether you can drink defrosted beer or not?

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