What made you laugh today?

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Years ago, we too lived in Yorkshire, and on the way to school, there were pheasants littering the roads, both alive and dead. We picked a couple up for the tail feathers for fishing flies, and I never quite got to the point of eating them, but the man has a point. 

 

The rules are different here.

 

We hit a baby deer 2 years ago, which was very sad. In the UK we would have definitely loaded it into the back of the car and taken it home for delicious eats, here, we had to phone the police, who called the Förster, wait for him to come, swop details, he provided us with a letter and we paid him for it. Not completely sure why, but thems the rules. The deer went in the back of his car and can't get eaten, apparently. No idea why, and a total waste.

 

Hey ho.

 

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3 minutes ago, kiplette said:

we paid him for it.

This.

Germany does seem to be proficient at having you requiring scheins for all and sundry which surprise surprise always costs.

 

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3 hours ago, kiplette said:

Years ago, we too lived in Yorkshire, and on the way to school, there were pheasants littering the roads, both alive and dead. We picked a couple up for the tail feathers for fishing flies, and I never quite got to the point of eating them, but the man has a point. 

 

The rules are different here.

 

We hit a baby deer 2 years ago, which was very sad. In the UK we would have definitely loaded it into the back of the car and taken it home for delicious eats, here, we had to phone the police, who called the Förster, wait for him to come, swop details, he provided us with a letter and we paid him for it. Not completely sure why, but thems the rules. The deer went in the back of his car and can't get eaten, apparently. No idea why, and a total waste.

 

Hey ho.

 

 

Game belongs to the Jagdpächter (hunting tenant). This is why Jäger catching dogs hunting game are allowed to shoot them. Not reporting a collision with a car and loading the carcass into your car could result in accusation of poaching. The letter is a Wildunfall-Bescheinigung (which can cost a fee) for the car insurance should your car be damaged. 

 

This article provides infomation why the deer cannot be eaten: https://www.mainpost.de/regional/hassberge/ein-ueberfahrenes-reh-wird-nicht-zu-gulasch-art-9017608#:~:text=Was%20passiert%20dann%20mit%20den,Bamberg).

Quote

 

Is it still allowed to eat a wild animal that has been killed on the road?
Even if the wildest stories and rumours circulate about this: Hardly any roadkilled animal ends up on a plate. Several laws largely rule this out. For example, the passing on of game meat resulting from such an accident is forbidden, reports hunter Brückner. At most, the hunting tenant can use the meat for himself.

 

But here, too, regulations apply, such as the Animal Food Hygiene Ordinance (Tier-LMHV), according to which, according to Werner Hornung, head of the veterinary office in Haßfurt, animals killed by blunt force - this includes collision with a car - may not be utilised. According to the law, an animal suitable for slaughter must be killed with a weapon approved for this purpose. It must also be ensured that the organs are removed no later than one hour after death in order to prevent the spread of dangerous germs in the animal's body. According to Hornung, this regulation for the slaughter of domestic animals can be applied analogously to wild animals. This means that a deer or wild boar killed in a wildlife accident would only be suitable for consumption in rare cases. In addition, there are often a variety of injuries that occur in an accident and make the prescribed meat inspection - the search for obvious diseases or questionable changes in meat and organs - by the hunter very difficult.

 

What happens to the carcasses then?
Small animals, such as hares or small-sized deer, can be buried by the hunter, explains Brückner. Larger carcasses usually end up in a rendering plant, for example in Walsdorf (Bamberg district). According to the provisions of hunting law, it is also possible to bring parts of the game, but also whole carcasses, to so-called "Luderplätze". These are places in the forest where, for example, foxes, martens or birds of prey are fed in order to observe or hunt them.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

 

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7 hours ago, LeonG said:

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Oh dear! The Girls - my daughter and her wife - were here today, and that's how I felt when they went in my garage; but I wasn't wearing my walker and I have more hair than that geezer.

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On 30.5.2021, 09:21:45, katheliz said:

Oh dear! The Girls - my daughter and her wife - were here today, and that's how I felt when they went in my garage; but I wasn't wearing my walker and I have more hair than that geezer.

 

My brothers father in law is somewhat of a hoarder.  He has more than one storage units / garages full of stuff.  One time he was seriously ill in hospital, not expected to live, his kids emptied out one of them, much to the enjoyment of his wife.  He pulled through and it's been years but I don't think anybody told him yet.

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