A little advice on garbage sought

30 posts in this topic

Okay, so my fiance is a bit...bad at explaining this to me. I see the different bins-brown, blue, and green- and I have yellow, clear, and blue garbage bags. I THINK the brown is for bio, and blue is for paper. But you can't use a bag for the paper and bio stuff? you just put the left over food etc in the can itself? Seems kind of messy to me. The yellow bag is for what? I am totally confused, lol. Is there an english thread somewhere that helps explain this?

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Yeah, it's confusing! I live in Freiburg, so the color coding is a bit different, but here's the breakdown:

 

Brown is for bio. You can buy paper bio bags at Edeka and biodegradable "plastic" bio bags at AlNatura and Pennymarkt. Or you can just dump the bio stuff directly in if you prefer.

 

Our green bins are for paper and cardboard.

 

The yellow bag is for packaging materials. If it's made of plastic or metal (tin, aluminum, etc.), or if it's paper/cardboard with plastic, I put it in there. Technically, though, you're only supposed to put in items that have a certain symbol on them. But the whole thing's a joke, so don't mind that too much.

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OOh you have to be careful or the Muhlgestapo will get you. I have fallen foul of the nonsense many times.

 

It varies from place to place, but with us, it is kind of like this. The guy at the rubbish disposal place searches every car as they come in, last week they made someone pay 4.50 to throw away a 10cm long bit of polystyrene as it is "kostenpflichtig", so we're quite careful. Having said that, Mrs B never has a problem, just me, but that might have something to do with her female charms.

 

Blue bin: paper (magazines, newspapers etc.) but not wallpaper, or paper from packaging.

 

Green bin: anything from the household which has the recycling symbol on it "grune punkt"

 

Brown: bio bin, food left overs etc, but not teabags unless separated from their paper (honestly, you couldnt make this stuff up.)

 

Metal: Tin cans etc (have to be washed and labels removed, or hidden in the Green bin )

 

Cardboard: kept separately, but not card which has to go in the paper

 

Folie: plastic sheeting of all kinds and bubble wrap unless it is dirty in which case it has to go in the building rubbish.

 

Glass: you can put glass bottles in the bottle bank, but not glass from windows, vases etc.

 

Black bin: Restmuhl, basically everything, whatever you like, but it will cost you 4.50 per 20 kilos or thereabouts.

 

Spermuhl: big household things can be disposed of free at the dump, but only up to a certain weight (with us it's 120k a year)

 

Restmuhl: you can take anything you like to the dump and get rid of it, but have to pay.

 

Garden rubbish: wow, free of charge as they compost it and resell it.

 

or something like that

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The degree of separation, and the color scheme, differs from location to location, Blackcivicsi - so what Danila and Derekbeggs have posted doesn't necessarily apply to you. See if you can learn anything from the "Müll" page at essen.de. If not, you'll just have to ask your finance to explain it more clearly.

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or something like that

 

pretty much that, it depends on the city.

 

oh and btw you don't have to separate the teabags from the paper-thing .. paper is bio-degradable.

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Brown is for bio. You can buy paper bio bags at Edeka

 

I get mine for free from the town hall (Rathaus) or the local rubbish dump (Wertstoffhof). Doesn't stop EDEKA selling them though, I guess some people will buy anything even when they can get them for free.

As for charging for throwing stuff away, our local paper has an increasing amount of articles about fly tipping and how terrible it is. It doesn't seem to occur to them that charging is going to make some people choose to dump it in a ditch for free.

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Fly-tipping ("sneaky dumping"[1], "fly dumping"[2], or "dumping on the fly"[3]), often abbreviated simply to tipping, is a British term for illegally dumping waste somewhere else than in an authorised landfill. It is the illegal deposit of any waste onto land, i.e., waste dumped or tipped on a site with no licence to accept waste.[4][5]

 

I <3

 

Wikipedia

 

And indeed, sometimes the regulations are not just by town but by neighborhood. We have no Biomüll but there are people in Munich somewhere who do.

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It doesn't seem to occur to them that charging is going to make some people choose to dump it in a ditch for free.

 

Same up this end. Admittidly it was many years ago - when I lived in the UK (Cheshire) there was a tip a few miles away where you could bring just about anything for free. Better than the ditch.

 

Not far from where we now live is a small crossroads with no houses nearby. For years there have been bottle containers & paper containers. The paper containers get mostly filled by what looks like commercial packaging (usually cardboard) I guess to save money. But around the containers all sort of rubbish get deposited. T'other side of the road there is always a heap of garden refuse.

 

We call it "Müllkippe Kreuzung".

 

It all gets cleared away every couple of weeks. At least the sign "Müll abladen verboten" has also gone...

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oh and btw you don't have to separate the teabags from the paper-thing .. paper is bio-degradable.

 

you're absolutely right, however Herr Übermuhlägestapofuhrerwegwerfenautoreinschauenzuständigelautestimmekeinschwanz even started to mention the metal staple on the herbal teabag labels before being told that I would be separating the contents of my sons nappies from the rest over him if he didn't go and bother someone else with his rules. He did mention that he had to follow the rules, but piped down when I mentioned the Nuremburg defence doesnt work at the rubbish dump.

 

Mrs B does most of the rubbish now, wonder why.

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Where I live, it's blue bins for paper and they also have paper containers on every corner for paper as well as cardboard I think because many people put cardboard in them and I have never seen any signs saying not to. They also have containers on every corner or so for glass, separated by colour but ceramics not allowed. Then you have your green bin for biological waste and you are not supposed to put plastic in there. You can use paper bags or dump it straight in the bin. Then you have yellow bags for cans, plastics and alu-foil. You are not supposed to put paper or other garbage in the yellow bags. Some people do because their pick up is free but if the pick up guys see too much of that in the bag, they will leave it behind. Then you have the black bins for the garbage that doesn't fit anywhere else. Apartment buildings may have containers for black as well as yellow and some of the inhabitants don't seem to care much which container they dump it in but if there is a picky hausmeister, he may actually go through your garbage to make sure you dump it in the right bins.

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Omg, seriously? That's some complicated stuff right there. Oh, I long for the days in the Usa with one trash can, and one recycle bin that takes everything that has a recycle symbol on it...

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What she said.

 

I think it is so unfair when people live in poky little apartments, and have to cover half their bathroom or kitchen floor with recycling bins to separate the different wastes. I also seethe when I read how pensioners in the U.K. repeatedly get fined for not putting out heavy bins so the poor refuse collectors won't hurt their backs.

 

It seems like a shell game of misery and just a way to fine the hell out of folks, this "recycling" business. GRRR.

 

I will miss curbside collection (from wheeled bins travelling down a straight, even driveway) of a single recycling trash bin, which I can actually leave out the night before, if I want to.

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In which bin do tobacco canisters go? They seem to be made of paper, but have that foil coating on them. Do they go with the paper, or must they go into the regular garbage?

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In which bin do tobacco canisters go? They seem to be made of paper, but have that foil coating on them. Do they go with the paper, or must they go into the regular garbage?

 

Yellow bin.

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Martina Schwarzmann: Der König vom Wertstoffhof,

almost british humor, a little bavarian would be helpful..enjoy

 

 

 

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