Chat about Ireland and things Irish

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Well done Tipp!

 

Mícheál Ó Muircheartaigh made it 'look' beautiful on the radio. What a way with words...

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Well played indeed by Tipp!

 

Shefflin lasted only 13 minutes - would have liked the Tipp win even more if he had been at full strength.

 

But - whatever Kilkenny said beforehand - I didn't think he would last long.

 

There is no way you sustain an ACL injury and come back a month later.

 

What do you all say? Does it take any of the shine of Tipp's win because Shefflin wasn't a presence?

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If DJ carey and eddie keher and Shefflin were out there today for KK, Tipp would still have won the match.

 

I was fortunate to have been at the game - my wife is a Tipp woman.

 

Great win for Tipperary, they were superb.

 

Spoke to some KK supporters before the game and they regarded it as a foregone conclusion that KK would win :(

 

I've got to say KK players and their management team were very gracious in defeat today.

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I am going to comment about this over here.

 

 

because in Ireland we say: "amn't I?"

 

 

 

Orla, it might be said by certain people in certain parts of the country, but it sure as hell isn't written. Certainly not by anyone with any decent level of education.

 

My comment was not actually meant to be taken too seriously.

 

However, I do say "amn't I?". I say it when I am teaching. I also tell my students that it is an Irish-ism. My daughter says it (not sure if she still does since she has been living in the UK for a few years). It said a lot for her teacher at school that he never corrected her.

 

I certainly write "amn't I". Of course, if I was writing a formal paper or letter, I would write "aren't I?" (as in the test!!!).

 

Earlier today I read a post. I had not looked at who had written it, but, when I got to this point of the post:

 

 

I gave out to him and said "we agreed no presents" - although secretly I was delighted to get one!

 

I thought: "IRISH"!!!

 

Thank god for "certain" people.

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Well, don't let your tongue cut your throat, I always say...

 

And pick up a copy of the Barrytown Trilogy, for goodness sake... "Amn't I" is on nearly every single page!

 

But then, you know, the Rabbitte Family clearly doesn't come from the "right" part of Dublin...

;)

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Hi Orla, yep, I use it too, all the time. But here on TT, I use things I would never write in something formal. I feel a forum like this is where we "chat" to each other rather than "write" to each other.

 

Another thing I notice about Irish people is the use of conditionals, I hear it on the radio all the time.

 

"Where do you work?" "That would be ...."

 

"Where did you go to school?" "That would have been...."

 

"What did the burglar look like?" "He would have worn a ....?

 

I wonder why we use such complicated structures?

 

And the other one I like is..."I'm after reading a great book", "I'm after losing my bag", but I know that comes directly from Irish.

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Yeah I do be always saying amn't : )

What's the correct alternative? I aren't? I always thought that sounded stupid.

Or do you just mean that in formal writing you use am not. In that case I always try to use the full form of words instead of abbreviations.

 

What about these? "If I was you" or "if I were you" ?

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Another funny thing that happened in class a while back:

One of my students told us that she was going to visit her sister, who was expecting, in Norway. I asked her if this was the first time she was going to be an aunt.

 

Another student who is bilingual (English father) almost fell off his chair laughing .. because I had pronounced it "aant".

 

I told him that it would take too long for me to pronounce "awwwwwwwnt"

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One of my pet peeves: Germans who think they can pronounce "Dublin" with an Irish accent. And they slag you?

 

post-33471-12842045820891.gif

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I say "I amn't" all the time. If I was writing it I think I'd write "I'm not" though. What was the discussion the original "amnt' I/aren't I" question came up in? This whole thing is reminding me of Mr. Topper, anyone else know that film?

 

George: Aren't I?

Marian: Come and sit down. And don't say aren't I.

George: Okay. Ain't I?

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@ecleary & Orla Inka: "If I were you..."; were IS conditional, which is why it is correctly "were" instead of "was". "Was" would be wrong. For technically good grammar, "Amn't I" would be wrong too, unless rhetorically used, for the same reason; you're asking a question.

 

Ain't no big deal...English has lost so much grammatical sense in the language that it is mostly pointless and often useless to be correct. One of my most horrible moments in Germany is to have my English grammar corrected, correctly, by my German girlfriend, who could barely speak the language. So let your Irishisms run rampant, as they add a some local color to a language with many local colors.

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Thanks for the lesson, oh great one.

 

I will use "amn't I", not only because I consider it logical, but really because my vernacular.

 

If I want to be posh, or want to get full marks on an internet English test, or want to be formal or if I feel like it: I will use "aren't I" - as if I have a hot potato in my mouth.

 

No discussion and no need to lern the rites and rongs of speekin* and ritin*

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Does that make you a "be amn't 'er"?

 

I'm after getting my coat...

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I was always happy with the scholastic output of apprentices until the sprogs started turning up without the essential basic skills; reedin', ritin', rithmatic. :)

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So, speaking of Irishisms and Irish speech patterns, apparently a lot of people find the Irish accent (used when speaking English or American) quite sexy. But which (foreign) accent do you think is the sexiest when listening to spoken German?

 

I would say Irish is still up there, along with Italian and French... and maybe Ruhrpott... :lol:

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Interesting question, proclusian, but not easily answered by me, as in 26 years I've heard so many non-Germans who, depending on their momentary humour and the stress level of the situation they were dealing with, could vary from sounding (maybe unintentionaly) so seductive that you'd feel you're being undressed with their verbal talents to such unmelodic tones of painful eardrum rending crassness that you'd wish for earplugs.

 

May be some southern USians, Welsh country girls or north and western Scots carry the former through more consistently, probably because their own English dialects or accents are, like most Irish ones, naturally softer than many German ones.

 

I've had a lot of telephone contact over the years with Germans who also, even in business discussions, spoke English in a far more charming and sexy way than they ever would come across in their mother tongue, too.

 

Most impressive and/or amusing was listening to those ones who had, through military marriages and periods of exile to parts of the USA or UK, aquired near identical speech habits of certain states or counties including the use of local idioms.

 

It used to crack me up totally to listen to one particular young lady. She'd been chosen in her Munster school as spokesperson for her clear and perfect Hochdeutsch and was a strong critic of Germans using lazy or street cool speech. Through marriage to an Irish Guardsman in Germany and being stationed in Kent and Northern Ireland she aquired a unique mixture of what only could be described as London Irish. Never have I heard someone with a more charmingly mongrelised vocabulary. She consistently mixed unmistakable Belfast area accented words and idioms with bang up to date Cockney rhyming slang, some of which I had to ask the meaning of as my knowledge of the latter was a couple of decades behind hers. :blink::lol:

 

2B

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My all-American daughter says "amn't" all the time, with no Irish influence whatsoever. (We have Irish friends here, but I really don't think she's ever heard that from them.) I can't bring myself to correct her, because grammatically, it makes perfect sense!

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Interesting stories, 2B. During my most recent time in Trier (2004-2007), I had the most contact with Frenchies, Luxembourgers, and Irish (although some Italians and Argentinians came to our Institute at Trier Uni as guest researchers, and one Japaner). I would also hear (occasionally) Americans, on TV or in radio interviews.

 

Usually, with the Americans, I was most struck by their horrible accents and their inability to master the phonemes of the German language. In some cases, they had lived in Germany 20+ years, and had a great knowledge of the language itself, but just couldn't get the phonemes right (especially ü, ö, and ä, of course, as well as r, s, and z). They reminded me of Helge in this great Persiflage here:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1unhoK3hHA

 

With the Letzeburgers, they were usually pretty spot-on, sounding like normal at will.

 

The Irish and the French had mastered the language, but their accents still crept through in some ways. I dated 3 women while I was there (one after the other, not at the same time), and they were from Düsseldorf, Dresden, and Genova, respectively. I also got to know two Irish girls pretty well, whom I didn't date, and one Argentinian colleague.

 

To me, the Italian accent was the sexiest in spoken German, but I was under the influence. The Irish accented spoken German was a close second, followed by the Argentine/Spanish accented German. French accented German was up there as well.

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