Marriage and getting married in Germany

350 posts in this topic

Yes, true about Denmark. I'm from Canada and my documents for getting married in Germany were stolen in Canada when my car was broken into. We had only 3 months until our wedding date and I didn't want to pay for all the documents again in Canada; not to mention having to get each document translated into German at additional expensive costs. So we just travelled to Ribe, Denmark, the oldest town in Denmark and were so delighted to have our wedding in the midst of a traditional marriage town with lots of viking garb! It was a perfect place to get married and also travel around. Our accommodations were with a very nice woman who lived right in town, whom we found her house on the internet. 2 weeks later, my family and friends from Canada, the US, places in Europe came to our big celebration wedding in Germany. The wedding was a blast as it went on until 5 in the morning (normal to celebrate weddings all night here). Even though with all the trouble of getting married away from Germany and Canada, it was so worth it to "elope" in such a beautiful country and then celebrate a little later.

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Dont even have to leave Toytown.Go to "Other features"> "Friendly links". Click on marriage in Denmark.

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To Asafaboy -

 

I am south african and had to return to south africa, to obtain my spousal reunion visa, it does not end just there, u also need your A1 certificate of the german language course( you have to do this in South Africa by the goethe institute ) , together with all her details/ papers, ur marriage papers has to also be appostille with ur birth certificate, then only are u granted a visa to come back to Germany,

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I thought that it would be impossible to marry my German fiance in Germany, but guess what? It is possible!!! Saved a lot of money and hassle compared to Denmark: Travel costs, more expensive, the only advantage is marrying faster and easier. But you get what you pay for. I can handle the wait.

 

As an American, all I had to provide in Germany was:

 

 



  • Passport
  • Original Birth Certificate+translation (cost only 15 EUR)
  • Affidavit+translation(document saying I'm single and unnmarried)- cost only 21 EUR from the Frankfurt consulate including translation
  • Income statements (I used my bank statement with exchange rate attached and that sufficed)

 

Plus the fees from the Standesamt under 90 EUR.

 

So totaling up under 130 EUR! It doesn't hurt to try in Germany. The worst thing they can say is "no."

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Plus the fees from the Standesamt under 90 EUR.

 

So totaling up under 130 EUR! It doesn't hurt to try in Germany. The worst thing they can say is "no."

 

I don't know how you got so lucky with the fee to the Standesamt....I just want to clarify to anyone that is new and reading this, that 90 Euros is not a set fee! I just don't want someone to read this last post and go to the Standesamt and think that you will only pay less than 130 Euros and be shocked. Please make sure you read the postings prior to this. I know personally that our marriage through the Standesamt was more than 400 Euros, even paying 20 some Euros on the day of the wedding for the International Wedding Certificate.

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Mine was over 400 as well . The fees are based on income, and proof of income must be supplied.

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Sorry for not clarifying. I guess I did get lucky. I don't know how, but they were just very friendly to us.

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Seems things havent changed since 1994. it took us over half a year to get all the papers done. plus i still remember all the fees, not counting the costs for the hotel in hamburg to be in time at the british consulate.

 

for all the trouble it caused, by the time we got married we werent in the mood anymore :-(

 

we even needed a translator at the wedding because my husbands best man couldnt speak german.

 

i also remember being invited by the standesbeamte for an interview some time prior to the wedding. she told me that by law she has to inform me about the problems that could occur marrying a foreigner, for example in some countries men are allowed to have more than one wife (*hello he is european... since when do they have polygamie in uk???*).

 

its an endless story.

 

when our daughter was born i waited ages for her birth certificate. when i phoned the standesamt they told us we had to come and make a declaration as to whose surname she should carry (*hello our surnames are the same since we got married???*). seems we both carry our surnames by a different law *argh*

 

bureaucracy

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Ummm...

 

My future wife returned from the townhall yesterday with a list of things that we (well, I) require. One of these, one of those and something or other else.

 

I didn't sleep too well last night and now after reading through the past 8 pages of this topic I am petrified about the whole process.

 

..Not the process of Marriage but the process of getting all said paperwork (I am from the UK and the other half is German).

 

I really don't know which way to turn!!

 

Is there somebody or an official office (English speaking) here in the South west of Germany (Freiburg to be exact)?

 

Any advice would be a massive help.

 

...And if I wasn't aready having a bad start to the day, I have just realised that my cup of tea has gone bloody cold!!!

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It is not that bad if you have patience. If you have worked in germany already then you will be ready to go through this. If you have not them this will prepare you for working in Germany. I got married in Hawaii so things went smoother when I got back. Our only delay was the office was moving and had to wait until the office move was complete(so sind die deutsche). Anyway relax dude you will do fine. Just have patience.

 

Good luck

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Get Married in Denmark..easy peasy can be romantic..I even got married there on 25th December!

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Seems things havent changed since 1994. it took us over half a year to get all the papers done. plus i still remember all the fees, not counting the costs for the hotel in hamburg to be in time at the british consulate.

 

Back in 1988 we got everything set up within a few months. We lived in Wedel (Schleswig-Holstein) at the time & Standesbeamtin was very helpful. Set up having us married according to both German & UK systems. Luckily a S-Bahn ride to the british consulate sorted that in one morning.

 

 

we even needed a translator at the wedding because my husbands best man couldnt speak german.

 

Avoided that by having two German friends as witnesses. When they later got married I was one of their witnesses. Seems to have worked so far in both cases....

 

 

when our daughter was born i waited ages for her birth certificate. when i phoned the standesamt they told us we had to come and make a declaration as to whose surname she should carry (*hello our surnames are the same since we got married???*). seems we both carry our surnames by a different law *argh*

 

Our first son was born in Rissen which is Hamburg & i can just recall one visit to Hamburg & came away with the birth certificate in n copies.

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I didn't sleep too well last night and now after reading through the past 8 pages of this topic I am petrified about the whole process.

 

I am from the UK and the other half is German

Look, it really is not that much hassle atall. I'm English, married a krout bird, and in the end, all I had to do was provide a copy of my birth certificate, passport, and answer a couple of questions at some local amt.

 

Anyway, if your other half is German - then get them to sort it all out. It's their bloody lingo and country after all.

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Anyway, if your other half is German - then get them to sort it all out. It's their bloody lingo and country after all.

 

Yep my only discomfort is that mine made me get up 9am , skip coffee, and go sign some papers. I think the most annoying thing was that she asked me to help pick out some album book from the city to place the certificate. I just looked at her and she knew there was no way I was going to interrupt drinking that Cola from the machine.

 

Oh afterwards we went to McDonalds for breakfast across the street. How romantic!

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for a Brit, all that stuff about declaration of no impediment documents, or whatever name people are using, is no longer needed. Atall. You just pop along to an amt person, say yes or no to a few questions*, sign a bit of paper, which they send off to some other amt or something, and you pay 50 quid or so.

 

*If you speak little or no German, just learn the words for yes and no, and have your future wife/husband give you 1 kick under the table for yes, and 2 for no. Simple.

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I do not know what has changed since May 1992, but I had to get birth certificate from the U.S. with embossed seal, get blood work done, hire a translator (I didn't speak German that well then) and other costs. I was in the U.S. Army at the time, so money was not a problem. Still, it wasn't expensive though.

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My wife is German, I am American. When we were planning to be married 4 years ago, my (future) wife was presented with a 4-page list of documents that I would have to provide to the German government before this glorious union could be solemnized in Germany. Some of these documents I could not obtain if I lived to be 1000 years old (such as a birth certificate and copy of the passport of a former wife, etc.). One of the most ludicrous demands was a document proving that I was single; i.e., eligible to marry. No such document exists in the U.S. I had my duly authenticated certificate of divorce, but that was insufficient. In short, marriage in Germany was made impossible by the absurd requirements of the bureaucracy. We therefore decided to be married in Scotland. I applied for and was granted a visa to the U.K. for the specific purpose of getting married. Just prior to arriving in Scotland we discovered that Scotland is required to observe Germany's documentation requirements when a German national is involved. So much for that brilliant idea.

 

Ultimately we did what we should have done in the first place -- we were married in the U.S. It took all of 20 minutes to get the marriage license, no hassle, and cost about 100 bucks. A judge friend of mine then performed the ceremony at his house. Armed with a certified, notarized copy of the marriage certificate, we then presented ourselves to the German authorities who were legally required to recognize our marriage. I recommend that foreign nationals who wish to marry a German do it somewhere else and spare yourselves all that unnecessary bureaucratic grief. Marriage is challenging enough without adding Kafka to the mix.

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Not sure what the "4" pages were about. But all a yank has to do to get his/her "I'm a single person" certificate, is go to the local consulate and pay 10$ for it. It's in German and English, so no translation needed. Have no idea abt the divorce thing, but other people do it.

 

The hard part was the "proof of prior address", but we got around that by registering me first and then going for the marriage application. The longest wait I had was waiting for the birth certificate to arrive from the US. But everything else here was no big deal. The ceremony was actually amazing.

 

Just my experience.

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Okay.. I made sure that I drank my tea before I started browsing today..

 

I would like to thank 'you lot' for your messages since my last post a few weeks ago.

 

...Well, I went alone (Ohne freundin) to the townhall. I explained that the research that I had done on the interweb basically stated that for me to get a 'Statement of no impediment' I would have to go along to my local office, close to where I am living IN THE UK. I told the woman down the road here in Germany, I believe that I can't get my hands on the paperwork as officially I have been living here for the past two years!! ..And my 'local office' is here!

 

...The other half said she also had told her this.

 

Anyway the woman behind the desk (who was obviously too busy to stand up to welcome me in.. Or is it that I am too old fashioned?) informed me that all I require now that I don't need the impediment thingy is a copy of my Birth Certificate. Which in itself pisses me off as I have the Original in the cupboard that I have been looking after for special occasions such as this.. I require a copy of my Birth Certificate that has an Appostille stamp. I have since ordered this online and am waiting for its delivery.

 

Price for said copy if anyone is interested.. €100!!

 

...Or you can 'upgrade' to one that can be delivered in the next few days for double the price. This is for me, a needless expence because, as I have already said, I already have one.

 

I will post again in a few days to let you all know how such a Certificate can cost so much money.. It probably looks lovely ;)

 

Have a good day all.. And take care out there!!

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The whole process seems ridiculous and a little scary! The BF and I weren't planning on getting married in the next months but once I move to Germany in June I know I will only have 3 months to find a job (if I don't have one before I go). We agree that if I can't find a job we would go ahead and move up our plans of marriage but I see that it won't be that easy there. I'd rather come home to visit and get married here in Texas which would take no time at all and no hassle.

 

Why so complicated?

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