Marriage and getting married in Germany

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How 'bout a trip to Vegas? 5 minutes, free cocktails and you hold your spot at the blackjact table during the "ceremony". :lol:

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Apostel is sort of a holy one that takes care of you both I guess, or a phrase of the bible to do the same.

 

I also married my wife here (in palatinate to be correct) a few month ago, and we had no problems whatsoever. We also didnt need any Apostel (seems to be a bavarian thing) Might be simply because I am german and know what is necessary. Foreign weddings here are infact a little tricky. The country of choice around europe will be denmark.

 

Easy going there...

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@frank -- if you get married IN GERMANY you certainly don't need an Apostille for Germany. You'll need it when you move to another country.

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Frank might not, but Frank's wife might have done if she isn't German. Essentially a non-German getting married in Germany will need some documents from their home country and that means that they will (in most if not all cases) need to be apostilled first - this MIGHT mean they also need to be notarised in advance.

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German: Apostel = http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostel

English: Apostle = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle

 

Simply go and ask the priest that marries you. I translated the only document (Her birth certificate) myself and he has "beglaubigt" it. Never heard the word Apostel in any other context then the one I mentioned and I could believe that here in bavaria you actually need to choose an "Apostel" of the bible to get married at certain "Standesamt" around here, because even in the governmental things, they are very christian.

 

@Gen: For me an Apostel is soley what I linked in here. I therefor dont know if we talk about the same thing.

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For getting married out of the country and then getting the certificates approved here, unless they've done it themselves. I think you'll be okay Keydeck.

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I went to the Standesamt this morning to find out what I need for our wedding and was pleasantly surprised by how easy it is apparently going to be. I don't need any Apostilles or similar, all I need to do is get my birth certificate translated by a state approved blah blah blah translator living in Germany. Anyone know of one here in Munich? Maybe we even have one here on the board?

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We didn't need an apostile either - just the translation from a certified translator. We used Lisa's Office. It took a week and cost 25 euros / birth certificate. We were able to drop them off with her on a Saturday, so no having to take time off work to sort it out.

 

When we went in with all the paperwork, was how much we earned net/month. They use this to work out how much to charge. They don't ask for any proof of earnings though, so if you want to save a few euros, there's no reason (other than your conscience, I guess) not to lie and round it down a bit.

 

Don't know if this will be applicable to you or not, but the other thing they asked us was how many certificates we wanted, and we said 4 (one + a spare for us, and one for each set of parents), but what we didn't realise that only one will be an international certificate in multiple languages, the others will be in german only. If you want more international copies, you'll probably have to specify this, and maybe pay a bit more.

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Isn't the Apostille the thing that only exists in Germany that says you are not married and have never been married?

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No, an Apostille is a bit like an international Notary (if Jimbo will allow me to be so general). Why and if you need one to get married all depends on where you and your future spouse are from. We (Aussie & Canuck [not Canuck, but Canadian])need paper after paper for us to get hitched here. Here's the list of what we need.

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We gave up trying to get married in Germany, the main sticking point was that we were told all our Docs had to go to a German court with no forcast on when they would be returned !

 

We got married in UK came back to Germany used a court approved translator to Germanise my forms.. wedding Certif, Birth cert etc..and Bobs your uncle all done and dusted. :rolleyes: Now I get to repent at lesiure

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Nice story here of how a divorced German guy and a divorced American woman gave up on trying to get married in Germany... they get married in the US instead and bring an apostille back to Germany with them, muuuuch easier. This story takes place in Hamburg too. In German. Yes, the J they talk about on her family's Abstammungsurkunde documents will have been for "Juden" -- not something she really wanted to bring up.

 

Really, any time anyone writes of their experiences they should say what their citizenship is as it makes a HUGE difference.

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Denmark is quite easy. A few years back, it cost 50 Euro, and one can get marriage certificates in pretty much any language needed.

 

My spouse and I had a two week wait for an appointment and found it very easy.

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I was pretty pissed off when we were presented with a fee (based on our incomes). That and the other misc. fees would have covered a flight for one to vegas for an elvis wedding. But hubby wanted the traditional church thing in Munich... That was nice, but if I could turn back the clock, it would have been elvis in vegas and party/reception in munich.

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Right now, I'm getting pissed off at the German consulate in Vancouver. It seems there is only one person in the entire office who deals with "Legalisation" of birth certificates, and last week he was on holiday and today I'm only getting his voice mail. Why the fuck do you have colleagues for if they can't even take over for you to answer to simple questions? Everyone in Germany has been up until now been helpful and friendly, but these overseas Beamters are doing my nut in.

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