Marriage and getting married in Germany

350 posts in this topic

Just now, chooyo said:

 

At least in my state (Connecticut), any official replacement birth certificate was embossed and the date that they did it was recorded and provided to me.  Maybe it's different where you lived?

I am not American.

My birth certificate is dated on the date I was born, or around it.

 

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Ok and understood.  In the US, it has the date of birth as well as a date of issue that is within a few days of when you're born but it's pretty easy to lose that piece of paper over the years so replacements are somewhat common.

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You can request a stamped/certified copy of your US birth certificate at any time.  My understanding is that for German purposes, you HAVE to get a new copy, and get an apostile stamp on it for it to be considered valid.  That is the "issued less than 6 moths ago" part.  

 

I know at least 5 people from other countries who have had to do the same, and succeeded (some through great effort - eg personally travelling to Serbia to do the paperwork) to get married.  That's the deal.

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10 minutes ago, chooyo said:

Ok and understood.  In the US, it has the date of birth as well as a date of issue that is within a few days of when you're born but it's pretty easy to lose that piece of paper over the years so replacements are somewhat common.

Ok, got it. But as far as I understood, the 6 months old birth certificate is the German requirement for marriage... :)

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Hi DickWayne.

Congrats to you both...

I am not from the US, Im a Pommy Scumm as some americans may put it LoL...

However, jokes aside...

I am in the process of getting married here to my beatiful fiancee and find it to be quite a task.

I am a divorcee so I needed to get my wedding certificate, my divorce certificate and my birth certificate translated.

My divorce certificate (decree absolut) I needed to send to the UK and get stamped by the court where I got divorced. I also had to fill out an article 39 which translates the the divorce absolute and is a standard document which is to be filed with the decree absolut. Now we have an apointment with the local Standesamt on Friday to present all our documentation pay our fee and then all the docs go off to the landesgericht for them to make sure I am no bigamist and allow the wedding to go ahead...off course after we pay the largest of all fees which is related to our combined salary...

Now I dont have to get an apostille for any of my documents as Im from the UK (according to the Standesamt woman)... 

will see how it goes...

 

Anywho... 

good luck to you guys... 

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On 3/2/2017, 8:32:58, DickWayne said:

Topics merged by admin

 

Hello all! I am from USA and have been living here in Munich for 2 years now. I came here with my lovely Girlfriend who lives here after we met during travels abroad. I recently proposed (she said yes:P) and we are now in the beginning stages of planning the wedding. So, the question is, what kind of documentation will I need to provide to get the process started? I have done some research and gotten a fair amount of mixed results. It seems definite that I will need a birth certificate that was issued no more than 6 months ago, which has been apotilled. Also, a document that states I am not married back in the US. That's about as far as I have gotten. I'm wondering if there's anyone who has been through the process that may be able to shed some light before I go to the KVR and get 1000 conflicting answers. Thanks everyone for the help in advance. All the best.

 

Dick Wayne:  we're all very disappointed with you.

 

OP.JPG

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An American friend of mine is getting married at the Berlin Standesamt to a non-EU citizen - he has a single status affidavit from the American consulate but no longer possesses a copy of his divorce certificate (issued in Berlin 10 years ago). 

 

Does the Standesamt also require the divorce certificate - even though the divorce was completed in Berlin?

 

 

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Thanks for the confirmation. Guess he has to see how amenable his stateside ex will be about lending him the documents seeing as the current wait-time for such documents (Familiengericht Pankow) could be upward of 6 months.

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Quote

 

Ein oder beide Verlobten waren schon mal verheiratet oder verpartnert?
 
• Eheurkunde mit einem Vermerk über die Auflösung der Ehe  10,00 €*

• Lebenspartnerschaftsurkunde mit Auflösungsvermerk  10,00 €*

• Scheidungs-, Aufhebungs-, Nichtigkeitsurteil mit Rechtskraftvermerk der letzten Ehe/Lebenspartnerschaft

• Sterbeurkunde des früheren Ehegatten/Lebenspartners bzw.  beglaubigte Abschrift aus dem Buch für Todeserklärungen    10,00 €*

• Von allen weiteren Vorehen sind folgende Angaben von Nöten: • vollständige Namen des Ex-Gatten  • Eheschließungstag und -ort 

• Datum und Ort der Auflösung der Ehe; dem Gericht bzw. dem Standesamt) (es empfiehlt sich daher die entsprechenden Unterlagen wie Familienbuch / Heiratsurkunde / Scheidungsurteil / Sterbeurkunde etc. mitzubringen)
 

 

 

- https://www.berlin.de/ba-friedrichshain-kreuzberg/politik-und-verwaltung/aemter/amt-fuer-buergerdienste/standesamt/flyerdtschdtsch.pdf

 

Is the Eheurkunde with the divorce annotation (bolded) a separate document from the German divorce certificate that also needs to be requested from the Familiengericht?

 

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