Germans don't know how to queue

186 posts in this topic

@mbamps, but even that gets ignored in my experience.

 

Leipzig airport passport control is a classic, not flown into it for a few months but I still think it's the same.

 

When arriving and walking through to passport control there are 4 little boxes where the officers sit, approximately 2 metres in front is a line that goes straight along the hall with the words "Bitte hier warten" or something similar in front of each box.

As people come down the escalator into the hall there is a cordon to control the crowds and everyone waits at the end of this until a passport officer is free, meaning the area in front between the cordon and line in front of the passport officers is completely empty.

 

Rather than wait in this disorganised line I just walk past everybody and round to the end of the queue and wait at the line in front of one of the officers. The faces and murmurs from behind are quite amusing and even the passport officers find it funny.

 

The passport officers even encourage people to wait at the line in front but it just falls on deaf ears.

 

Now if thats not a clear instruction then I don't know what is.

 

Just to add, don't know if this has been mentioned but a similar thing happens with lifts, our german friends just do not understand that waiting for the lift right in front of it is a no brainer, the people have to get out before they can get in.

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I wouldn't say queueing is an entirely alien concept to Germans, but I have had way more experiences of people 'absent mindedly' handing over their stuff to the Kasse before me when I was clearly ahead of them. I soon learned that the trick is stand so close behind the person in front of you that they can easily identify what you had for breakfast by the smell of your breath.

Any more zhan a cigarette paper's breadth between you and you're toast.

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I spent some days in London last December and I must say you guys are guilty of promoting high expectations on this poor soul. After reading thousands of times here in TT how Germans can't queue and how English can I finally went to the land of the Queen and I must say I am pretty disappointed, it is basically almost exactly the same thing, I saw almost the same problems I've seen here in Germany for years. People trying to break the queue, people feeling entitled for whatever reason for breaking the queue, people running for their lives when a new queue is open and not respecting who was there first, etc. The only thing that was different was waiting for the bus, that part is partially true, some people do queue up, but then when the bus is there not everyone respects the queue. German do not queue on the bus because they are not used to, it is just a cultural thing.

 

P.S., Other unrelated thing I've learnt about London is that shopping there is bloody marvelous, after so many years in Germany I forgot how nice shopping can be.

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London is not the UK. Textbook error there old boy, but as you're a foreigner you're forgiven. ;)

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I wouldn't disagree with you Krieg, I'm in London all the time but I do notice if you look around when queuing a majority of the people aren't English.

 

After all, London's second language is Polish so perhaps not being able to queue is more a mainland Europe thing and perhaps it's more obvious in germany cause we live here.

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People trying to break the queue, people feeling entitled for whatever reason for breaking the queue, people running for their lives when a new queue is open and not respecting who was there first, etc.

None of that ever bothers me. When a new queue opens up, I stay just where I am. If I have several items, I'll let just about anyone get in front of me.

 

One time two friends chose different queues, with a friendly bet on who would be first. I turned around, looked at the guy behind me and said, "you win", letting him take my place as the next in line to be checked out. Everyone laughed and it made his (and my) day just a bit brighter.

 

I have much better things to get irritated about than a couple of minutes more on line.

 

PS: That wasn't directed at you, Krieg, you just happened to have a handy list available.

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None of that ever bothers me. When a new queue opens up, I stay just where I am. If I have several items, I'll let just about anyone get in front of me.

 

This.

 

I will start queueing like English immediately after they fix their taps :D

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It's not so much that Germans don't know how to queue - just that some of them have, maybe, forgotten.

 

A long time ago, but in a place not so far away, there were the "International" restaurants run by the HO - Handelsorganisation der DDR. The Haus Budapest, Haus Prag, etc.

 

1) Arrive at restaurant.

2) Queue to get in through the door.

3) Queue up to hand in your coat or jacket at the Garderobe - and no, you couldn't just hang your coat on the back of the chair in the restaurant.

4) Join the next queue to the restaurant. The Head Waiter would then seat you when seats became available.

5) Phew! Made it! Order food and drink.

6) Eat and drink.

7) Join queue at the Garderobe, hand back your ticket, get your coat, get out and do something else.

 

And you should have seen the queues at food shops when something rare like bananas wre in stock.

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One or two remarks appear above about London.

 

Whilst people generally do queue in an orderly fashion for buses and in supermarkets, try getting OFF an Underground train at busy times. It's like fighting your way through a rugby scrum as those wanting to get on simply don't leave space for those getting off.

 

In a previous incarnation, I worked at Cambridge railway station in the days of good old British Rail. Before central locking of doors, doors could be opened individually and despite "Do not open the door until the train has stopped" notices, trains full of London commuters would arrive with doors held open (they opened outwards) by said commuters, so that those "first in the queue" could get off and be the first to get a taxi, first to get their car from the car-park or whatever. Such behaviour was particularly dangerous and potentially lethal at Cambridge, as the platforms are very long and the train would come in quite fast. One part of the train announcer's job was to warn people waiting on the platform to stand well back.

 

We decided to have a blitz on such behaviour, and would ask offenders we caught to go into the station supervisor's office to get a damn good dressing down.

 

"You can't do this! I pay good money for this ticket, I have a right to do xyz...."

 

"Shall I call the police? I saw you behaving dangerously and Keefy here is a witness."

 

"Blather, blather, blather, I'll write to the divisional manager, I'll do this, I'll do that..."

 

Just sayin'...

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"Brits don't know how to form a proper funnel; they queue even when it's unnecessary. Also, in supermarket queues they leave far too much space in front of them."

-- read on www.spielzeugdorfgrossbritanien.com

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When I was in England over Christmas I was queuing in a supermarket and when the person in front of me had been served and it was my turn, the cashier didn't start scanning my stuff straight away. At first I thought, "What is she waiting for, get on with it", then I realised she was waiting for the other customer to finish packing her stuff into her trolley!

 

See what you can get used to if you don't watch out! :D

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A long time ago, but in a place not so far away, there were the "International" restaurants run by the HO - Handelsorganisation der DDR. The Haus Budapest, Haus Prag, etc. ...

 

Let me correct that for you...

1) Arrive at restaurant.

2) Queue to get in through the door.

3) Queue up to hand in your coat or jacket at the Garderobe - and no, you couldn't just hang your coat on the back of the chair in the restaurant.

4) Join the next queue to the restaurant. The Head Waiter would then seat you when seats became available.

5) Phew! Made it! Order food and drink.

5a) Wait what seemed like hours

5b) Be told that the ordered items cannot after all be ordered

5c) Order alternatives

5d) Repeat 5a, 5b, 5c as required by circumstances on that particular day

6) Eat and drink Eat anything edible on the plate and, after making sure there are no foreign bodies in drink, drink drink.

7) Join queue at the Garderobe, hand back your ticket, get your coat, get out and do something else.

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Let me correct that for you...

1) Arrive at restaurant.

2) Queue to get in through the door.

3) Queue up to hand in your coat or jacket at the Garderobe - and no, you couldn't just hang your coat on the back of the chair in the restaurant.

4) Join the next queue to the restaurant. The Head Waiter would then seat you when seats became available.

5) Phew! Made it! Order food and drink.

5a) Wait what seemed like hours

5b) Be told that the ordered items cannot after all be ordered

5c) Order alternatives

5d) Repeat 5a, 5b, 5c as required by circumstances on that particular day

 

This was not my experience. Mine was:

5c) go back to 3) and leave the place to look for another restaurant which actually has some food in stock

6) be told at other restaurants that they don't accept us as customers since we hadn't booked in advance

7) go back to 1) and end up having a cheese sandwich (as everything else on the 5-page menu was not available)

 

This was in Dresden in 1987 IIRC

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Must have been lucky on my Dresden trip in 1984.

 

There was a Hungarian place close to the opera house, no queues, and brilliant food - a pork steak laced with smoked, spicy sausage.

 

I told the waiter that I'd really enjoyed the food.

 

"Ah", he said, "The reason is that we're all Hungarians here. No Germans working here at all."

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On 2/22/2010, 3:16:13, Chocky said:

Both good solutions, or you could just take as long as you need to take and ignore the tutting and huffing/puffing noises emanating from the queue behind you.

Old topic, but still  relevant  :)

I always say :"Einen Moment bitte" when shopping in a city "discounter" whilst packing the purchased items. Once an elderly lady commented "Also das war ja die reinste Provokation"  On the countryside where I grew up people seem to be more relaxed ("passt scho" or "it hudla"/don't hurry are more used than what seems to be standard in this country)   and even in town if it is a Rewe or Edeka etc. 

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Topic split from: The Vent

 

Does anyone else find this queue jumping rampage the Germans do in the supermarkets incredibly aggravating?

Well... I say supermarkets... but what I mean is literally any place where you have wait in line.

 

I've been here 7 years now and I can't seem to get used to it, drives me up the wall every time!

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