English Speaking Jobs In Frankfurt

88 posts in this topic

On 21/06/2017, 12:37:49, sparkymark said:

  will be moving to Frankfurt at the end of the summer to live with my girlfriend, the only problem is that I don't speak German and learning is going pretty slowly.

My question is though, what opportunities are there for non German speaking people? 

 

Keep in mind that there is no NHS in Germany. If you want to stay longer than 3 months you need German (or BaFin-approved foreign) health insurance. German public health insurance will only accept you if you apply within 3 months of arrival (don't wait till the last minute!).

 

Considering you don't have any skills that are currently in demand here, make sure to bring sufficient funds with you to fund your move and get settled. 

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17 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

Keep in mind that there is no NHS in Germany. If you want to stay longer than 3 months you need German (or BaFin-approved foreign) health insurance. German public health insurance will only accept you if you apply within 3 months of arrival (don't wait till the last minute!).

 

If you have 300 or so euros a month to spare, and want full health cover, then it is sound advice to get public health cover. There is very cheap private cover that you can get for the first 5 years in Germany for about 60 euros a month. It doesn't cover everything for but its a far better option in my opinion. Mawista is a good example that is BaFin accredited. If the worst happens and you need long term care, I guess you would go back to the UK anyway.

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On 21/06/2017, 12:37:49, sparkymark said:

Hello all, 

I'm sure that this topic has been covered many times but I need my own info. I will be moving to Frankfurt at the end of the summer to live with my girlfriend, the only problem is that I don't speak German and learning is going pretty slowly.

My question is though, what opportunities are there for non German speaking people? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Mark

 

I and many many others have done it, so get stuck in and try to enjoy it along the way. The way I see it you have 3/4 options. I would say be a bit careful as to which road you go down at the beginning. It's tempting to jump at the first thing that comes your way but it's not always easy to change paths once your heading down one.

 

1. Teach English - Like zwiebelfisch says...it's a bit of a default. If you wanna do this, start looking now into how to do this. But I'd be careful. From what I hear it's not that easy to realise, can be hit and miss with the number of hours, and do you really wanna be a teacher?

2. Zeitarbeit - Temp work basically. LeonG may come along soon and explain about it better. I did it in England for a bit. Quite enjoyed it to be fair. Sign up to the agencies and see what happens. Might provide you with some good contacts and get you used to the German work environment.

3. Irish pub - Another default but plenty do it and enjoy it. I would prefer that to teaching personally.

4. Get a full time job - This requires hard graft. Put together a decent package. German style CV and cover letter in English and German. Copies of all certificates etc. Then start hitting the job search hard. I mean 8-10 hours a day. In your situation I would search unfiltered. Look at every job. Apply to anything and everything that you thing you could live with (imagine doing it for at least a year).

 

Other than that. Make sure you get yourself registered (Anmeldung) when you get here. Make sure to get health insurance somehow (contact JohnG for help on that). And get yourself on a German course (VHS are cheap). German is not the nicest language to learn and it may seem difficult but actually a few years down the line and it can be not too bad. Coming from English it's probably one of the easiest languages to learn.

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I would agree with all of this except the "unfiltered" part. Germany is a country with comparatively good job opportunities compared to the UK, even if initially you may experience a certain... reluctance to take you. I'd suggest being open minded but not indiscriminate. Take every interview you get but focus strongly on jobs where you can honestly look the boss in the eyes and say "I know what I'm  doing"...

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When I say unfiltered I just meant don't put "english" in the search term. Or "service industry" or whatever. No search terms. Look at every job. Don't let any job fall through the cracks due to search terms. That's what I did. It's time consuming but the job I ended up getting would have been easily missed if I had been putting in search terms. I don't mean apply for every job there is.

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2 hours ago, Atrag said:

 

If you have 300 or so euros a month to spare, and want full health cover, then it is sound advice to get public health cover. There is very cheap private cover that you can get for the first 5 years in Germany for about 60 euros a month. It doesn't cover everything for but its a far better option in my opinion. Mawista is a good example that is BaFin accredited. 

 

Mawista does not fulfill the requirements of § 193 Abs 3 VVG and, therefore, is not sufficient for EU citizens. 

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

Mawista does not fulfill the requirements of § 193 Abs 3 VVG and, therefore, is not sufficient for EU citizens. 

 

Well I asked if they were BaFin accredited and told them I was from the EU and they still offered to insure me. I don't see the issue.  

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Be careful of going down the route of private health insurance, as far as I'm aware, for the locals, they cannot transfer out of the private into the state system, so while premiums seem low to start with, they will go up astromically with age. On top of that you may be expected to pay for treatment first and then claim back the costs later. I'm sure they will be someone here who can advise you properly.

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1 hour ago, Atrag said:

 

Well I asked if they were BaFin accredited and told them I was from the EU and they still offered to insure me. I don't see the issue.  

 

If you had actually have read the fine print, you would have noticed that they acknowledge that their insurance does not meet the requirements for German residents.

 

58 minutes ago, French bean said:

Be careful of going down the route of private health insurance, as far as I'm aware, for the locals, they cannot transfer out of the private into the state system, so while premiums seem low to start with, they will go up astromically with age. On top of that you may be expected to pay for treatment first and then claim back the costs later. I'm sure they will be someone here who can advise you properly.

 

I would recommend contacting @Starshollow or @john g. for advice.

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35 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

If you had actually have read the fine print, you would have noticed that they acknowledge that their insurance does not meet the requirements for German residents.

 

I wonder what real consequences this has. To me its just seems great that I am saving like 10k over 5 years.

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8 minutes ago, Atrag said:

 

I wonder what real consequences this has.

 

Facing bankruptcy after medical treatments that are not covered for example. And not being eligible for welfare at all: When an EU citizen does not meet the conditions for the Right of Free Movement he can not enjoy the advantages of that right. 

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

 

Facing bankruptcy after medical treatments that are not covered for example. 

 

To the same extent that a non-EU person with the same insurance, I suppose.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Atrag said:

 

I wonder what real consequences this has. To me its just seems great that I am saving like 10k over 5 years.

 

The issue will be if/when something changes (maybe you change jobs, or become unemployed and the arbeitsamt check) and you are potentially landed with backpayments for what you estimate to be in the region of 10 grand.   Or maybe you will be lucky, someone often pops up around this point in a thread and says dont worry I never had a problem.

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On Tue Jul 4 10:14:01, sos-the-rope said:

hi there @sparkymark - my advice is don't waste any time, register yourself as resident at the Buergeramt, then head immediately for the Arbeitsamt and sign up for an employment consultancy appointment. Take any training / job opportunities they offer and look around proactively yourself. Oh, and start learning German ASAP! Get the Michel Thomas CDs and start with those, and a couple of books / apps or whatever gets the job done.

Great advice sos,

 

My advice is to start specializing in your German career. The arbeitsamt may not be as useful as you think. I my self (uni graduate) was initially told by the arbeitsamt that I can start training and work in a senior care home.  Hence like what sos said, you need to be proactive yourself.

 

If you have any computer skills, I strongly urge you to find an IT  (first level) support job. Tons of English jobs in Germany.

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18 hours ago, Atrag said:

 

I wonder what real consequences this has. To me its just seems great that I am saving like 10k over 5 years.

 

Or you get caught (preferably after Brexit) and the Germans throw you out for freeloading and not complying with the Freedom of Movement requirements. 

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19 hours ago, Atrag said:

 

I wonder what real consequences this has. To me its just seems great that I am saving like 10k over 5 years.

 

if you'll need to switch to a REAL health insurance in Germany - Mawista is legally only a travel health insurance and, as said above, not suitable for EU citizen taking up full residence in Germany - you'll face back-charges for the time you have not been adequately insured. This happens especially with German private health insurances. German public insurances - into which you can not get only thru means of employment with a gross salary above 451 EUr and below the legal yearly threshold - may sometimes not make much of a fuzz about this. But you can't bank on it.

On top of that - since we offer health insurance advice now for more than 12 years to the Expat community in Germany: you would not believe how often we get inquiries with people who signed up for the max-5-year-duration plans from the likes of MAWISTA or CARECONCEPT  etc only to find out pretty much at the end of this period that they are now seriously ill or pregnant or have developed a chronical condition and then it is neigh on impossible to get a full private German health insurance other than into the so-called BASIS-tariff at 750+ EUR per month.

 

These Expat insurances are meant mainly for visiting academics with a time-limited stay from outside the EU. any other use - while accepted by the insurance companies themselves - is not compliant with German laws and can cause pretty dear consequences eventually. Therefore not to be recommended.

 

Cheerio

 

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15 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

 

Or you get caught (preferably after Brexit) and the Germans throw you out for freeloading and not complying with the Freedom of Movement requirements. 

 

Haha you're a bit of a sadist aren't you. Well it's worth the gamble I think. And for those that don't have 1000s to spend on health insurance every year then it's worth the risk. 

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14 hours ago, Starshollow said:

 

if you'll need to switch to a REAL health insurance in Germany - Mawista is legally only a travel health insurance and, as said above, not suitable for EU citizen taking up full residence in Germany - you'll face back-charges for the time you have not been adequately insured. This happens especially with German private health insurances. German public insurances - into which you can not get only thru means of employment with a gross salary above 451 EUr and below the legal yearly threshold - may sometimes not make much of a fuzz about this. But you can't bank on it.

On top of that - since we offer health insurance advice now for more than 12 years to the Expat community in Germany: you would not believe how often we get inquiries with people who signed up for the max-5-year-duration plans from the likes of MAWISTA or CARECONCEPT  etc only to find out pretty much at the end of this period that they are now seriously ill or pregnant or have developed a chronical condition and then it is neigh on impossible to get a full private German health insurance other than into the so-called BASIS-tariff at 750+ EUR per month.

 

These Expat insurances are meant mainly for visiting academics with a time-limited stay from outside the EU. any other use - while accepted by the insurance companies themselves - is not compliant with German laws and can cause pretty dear consequences eventually. Therefore not to be recommended.

 

Cheerio

 

 

Thank you. Thats good to know. So I should be looking for a full time job within 5 years that has public health insurance to stand the best chance of avoiding the back payments. Even if I had to pay the back payments, I think personally it would still be worth it. After 5 years I would be in a much better position to pay (one would hope). Suggesting this type of health insurance seems unspeakable here but actually in some cases it might be the best option. 

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Hello I have a similar question, although not completely the same. My wife is looking for a Job in Frankfurt, being not German.

Regarding languages, after 18 months of hard studying she got the certificate for C1 Level of German from the Goethe Institute. Her native language is Russian, but she is also fluent in Italian (almost mother tongue level) and English and has some knowledge of Spanish. She has a degree in humanistic sphere and previously she was working for the Fair (the Messe) of her city the communication office. In term of insurance she is currently covered by my private one.

 

I would like to ask you which kind of opportunities/companies in your opinion fit better to her profile?.

Which steps should we take in order to search for a Job (example contacting job agencies?) 

Thanks

Kind regards

 

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Hi everyone,

 

My husband will start to work in Frankfurt and I am also  searching for  a job. I have a bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering and masters degree in Engineering Management. I can speak fluent English and B1 level German. ( Wish to improve my German in a short time) I have 3 years experience in construction chemicals and polymers R&D and working as a R&D Specialist. Do you have any suggestions for me ? Thank you :) 

 

Burcu

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