Jakobsweg/Camino de Santiago

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Hey! I'm looking to do the Camino de Santiago this year (most likely in August or September) and I am searching for a route from Augsburg to Santiago de Compostela. I would like to walk a beautiful scenic route preferably down through Switzerland, Italy, France and across to Spain. How much time would this take vs. walking just across to France and on to Spain? Anyone have experience doing the pilgrimage or could point me to websites with routes? I've researched a bit but no maps found with routes from Augsburg. Thanks in advance!

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I thought I'd revive the topic. Has anyone ever done the camino? Still thinking about it, if I don't decide to head East and hitchhike to Istanbul instead. Was even of thinking of going all the way overland to India but it's pretty shitty for an America (i.e. Iran/Pakistan). Any ideas for either plans? Much appreciated :)

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not sure where you get your info, but camino de santiago starts and ends in Spain ;)

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You can find lots of info here:http://camino.xacobeo.es/en

I have done some bits (but max. 100 km) and it is a really great experience, you meet lots os different people, etc.

However this year is "santo" (holy) which menas it´ll be extremely busy (esp. August!) so getting a dorm will be hard if not impossible at times..

Enjoy it if you finally do it!

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hi, i've also been wanting to do the camino santiago and thinking of round about the same time, although i hear septemnber is a better time to go because it might be slightly cooler. is there a group going together? i know its a reflective journey but just thought I'd find out if there is a group anyway B)

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Here are some more links:

Wege der Jakobspilger

Deutsche Jakobswege

 

Roughly (there are always variants), a possible route would be: Augsburg – Memmingen – Bregenz ("Schwabenweg") – Einsiedeln – Schwyz – Interlaken – Schwarzenburg – Fribourg – Lausanne – Genève – Lyon – Le Puy – Moissac – Ostabat – Saint Jean Pied de Port (Via Gebennensis/Podiensis); alternatively via Valence – Arles – Toulouse, then continue in Spain.

 

Among the many travel descriptions, there's the bestseller in Germany by Hape Kerkeling "Ich bin dann mal weg". He planned to walk from St. Jean Pied de Port to Santiago in 35 days, doing legs of 20 to 30 km each day, in the end it took him about 40 days, with many ups and downs because of the physical challenge (the heat, the Pyrenees, always with the backpack, the lack of sleep in the spartanic, overcrowded pilgrim's albergues). Already back in 2001, the sudden rise in popularity could hardly be managed by the accommodation infrastructure, so that it sometimes became a race for the limited sleeping places. Finding a hotel instead can be difficult, too, in small towns. Perhaps starting in September, when the main holiday season is over, would be better? Anyway, it sounds like an interesting, if very ambitious plan. But hey, there's always the train/bus, if the legs won't carry anymore. Only the last 100 km to Santiago have to be walked, if one wants to get the compostela. What fascinates me about the Camino is the European dimension of this ancient network of different routes that all converge in the end.

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Thank you so much everyone, especially Rainydays. I did in fact read Hape Kerkeling's book (the English translation) and that is exactly what motivated me to do this trail. I'm torn however, between going on the Jakobsweg in August or saving it for another time and just working my way East to India this time around. My heart and instinct are leaning towards the East. I'll keep you guys posted.

 

Peace.

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I've only vaguely toyed with the idea, and learning that this year even more pilgrims are expected would make me defer it. But, as the saying in German goes, "Aufgeschoben ist nicht aufgehoben". NewyorkerinDE, you have an adventurous spirit. Compared to India, the Camino is a breeze. Take care! Clarajane, going by Kerkeling's book, one has to find out on the way whether walking alone or in a group works better, he preferred to be on his own with a few exceptions. In any case, it shouldn't be a problem to find spontaneaous companions for periods of time on the way.

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I would like to walk a beautiful scenic route preferably down through Switzerland, Italy, France and across to Spain.

Did you ever consider using a bike for such a trip? The distance is something like 2000 miles and often the countryside is a bit uniform. On a bicycle you have a comfortable seat, it's moving with barely any efforts from your side, and your sense of moving, of getting ahead, is more satisfying.

 

The caminos were created at a time when asphalt was barely known, so walking was a treat without ubiquitous motorized traffic and rock-hard pavements ruining the day. Nowadays it's difficult to walk anywhere without covering huge distances on plain roads.

 

Two or three years back I biked to Cabo Fisterra in Galicia, so occasionally I ran into some Camineros. None of them appeared too happy about the trip, as their suffering appearance quickly confirmed, and each of them envied me for the ease of my way of traveling. Takes about three or four weeks down there, and if you are in good mood, you can bike back on a similar path.

 

If you stick with your walking plans, there's a guy named Steffen Sandow in Kaufbeuren who walked in 2008 to the Nordkap, about same distance. Could be interesting for you to get in touch with him, guess he was covered by the newspapers.

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Postmann, I have indeed considered riding a bike for this trip. A friend of mine rode a bike down the coast of Italy and if that wasn't enough inspiration, I recently read a story about two guys who in '91 traveled and worked their way around the world with only their bikes and a little bit of DDR money in their pockets. I think it would be amazing, except I'm worried that I don't know anything about how to repair a bike in case something goes wrong. But I guess you can always learn along the way, right? Also what kind of bike would be good for this? I'll assume a mountain bike but one with a light frame wouldn't be bad. But what about my backpack? Guess I'd have to travel super light. Sleeping bag/tent would probably also be necessary? Not that I know how to put up a tent.. but still this sounds amazing. I would LOVE to hear your advice for doing such a long trek on a bicycle.

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I'm worried that I don't know anything about how to repair a bike

You can take classes at the local ADFC group. They offer different ones and even if you just visit their Werkstatt, usually open one evening a week, you can learn a lot.

 

 

I guess you can always learn along the way, right?

Not really, better be prepared, and you'll bike much more confidently.

 

 

Also what kind of bike would be good for this? I'll assume a mountain bike but one with a light frame wouldn't be bad.

If you plan to take a direct route, off-track and so, get a mountain bike. Otherwise think about how much fun biking will be in the rain, and get something coming with good mud guards... There are, what we call in perfect German, Trekkingbikes, and anything available of Deore quality and their likes will do.

 

 

But what about my backpack?

The backpack will vacation at home. Few bikers enjoy a sweaty back for days, weeks, if they can enjoy a trip without one. Put all gear into some good Ortlieb panniers (or similar) and feel free out there.

 

 

Guess I'd have to travel super light. Sleeping bag/tent would probably also be necessary?

Keep the weight at 30 to 40 lbs, that should be possible and won't impair your biking noticeably. A light-weight tent is okay, while not necessary. More important is a good sleeping bag and a comfortable sleeping pad, roughly 2 + 1 lbs of weight, but all that you'd need when walking either.

 

Come to think of it, usually people don't start out with 2000 miles trips, but rather bike a few hundred and see how things are going, then raise their range. Once you are able to bike 600 to 800 miles, you can go on and on, not much more will change regarding the strain on your body.

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LOL- @the most people don't start out with 2000 mile trips. Hm, I do tend to set the bar pretty high sometimes :)

 

That said, I'm researching this whole idea right now and have to admit I think I'd actually fare better walking and hitching. Firstly because I don't have my own bike, repair tools, or gear- like even basic cycling clothes. More importantly I'm not quite sure if I have the endurance. Despite this, I think it'd be an interesting challenge. I don't think the DDR boys had top bikes and tons of gear or experience. I guess I'll just have to read a little more about it regarding routes, distances, and expenses to decide...

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I'd also really like to do this walk this September/October for 2 weeks.

 

I've never hiked for more than 2-3 days at a time, so knowing what to pack for 14 days will be tricky for me. Any suggestions?

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On 13/1/2010 21:45:00, newyorkerinDE said:

Hey! I'm looking to do the Camino de Santiago this year (most likely in August or September) and I am searching for a route from Augsburg to Santiago de Compostela. I would like to walk a beautiful scenic route preferably down through Switzerland, Italy, France and across to Spain. How much time would this take vs. walking just across to France and on to Spain? Anyone have experience doing the pilgrimage or could point me to websites with routes? I've researched a bit but no maps found with routes from Augsburg. Thanks in advance!

 

I did the French and the Portuguese Camino and they were both amazing experiences! I guess it will take around 2+ to walk From Augsburg, depending on how much you walk every day and how long you spend in the stages point. For the first time, I'd recommend to do the French way, as it's the best conditioned for pilgrims, with lots of accommodation and restaurants. Once you do the french way, you'll learn a lot from other pilgrims and from your own experience on what your walking expectations would be, you can plan a longer walk (from Augsburg for example)

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