Buying a snowboard

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I got everything this time last year from SportScheck. It was all year-old stock one sale.

 

I picked up a good Nitro Atlas board for about €279 down from €449. I got very comfy Salomon soft boots for about €90 down from €210. The Ride bindings I got were not on sale and cost €179 I think.

 

It seems like a lot, but with this stuff spending too little works out false economy. I thought I would save some money and buy bottom range gloves, goggles and trousers. The goggles misted up after a few days, the trousers keep falling down, and the gloves aren't water proof. The items above though are good for many years to come I would have thought.

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Your boatd should be about 20 cm shorter than you i.e.roughly up to your shoulders. You get race boards, freeride/alpine and freestyle. You also get hard boots - are similar to ski boots - and soft boots. Hard boots go with race and freeride boards and they're meant for people who want to stay onpiste and race down. Soft boots go with freeride and freestyle boards and are meant more for jumping and tricks. Soft boots have the additional advantage in that they're not as slippery as soft boots i.e. you can walk around easier with soft boots on. I would get a freeride board with soft boots if I were you to start out with. I would also get soft bindings. They're the cheapest and actually they're better for snowboarding than the others. They do take a bit longer to put on and take off, but you get additional control from them than from step-in and flow. Flow is too expensive in any case.

 

I have a brandnew Nidecker freeride (advised boots are hardboots) 164cm which I'll give away for 100 EUR. It's still in its wrapping. Try out Karstadt Oberpollinger - I believe they have a special on.

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Go to the shop 'Boarders' near Harras. They know their stuff cos they're all boarders themselves and will kit you out with everything you need according to your budget and skill level. They'll even let you try the board and boots for a day or 2, and if you buy them you don't pay the rental cost. Pretty cool if you ask me. Don't be shy about asking them to knock a few Euros off either.

 

Boarders

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but you get additional control from them than from step-in and flow. Flow is too expensive in any case.

Expensive, yes. But even though I have only used my flows a couple of times so far, they are my fave part of my snowboarding kit. Worth every penny. They are certainly as secure as any traditional strap-in binding I have used. But yeah, the click bindings are generally a tad wobbly I find. But flows.. flows are great - the best of both worlds.

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I love my Clicker bindings, however I am a small guy. Maybe they are wobbly for the bigger folks. But I will go down anything without cliffs on my board.

 

I'd go for a freeride type of board as your 1st one. Free=style (you can ride it either direction for example), ride=decent speed and performance down the mountain. My Santa Cruz freeride will cut through crud on the slope with almost no chatter.

 

Probably you could find a used board/bindings, maybe boots would be a bit tougher. Strap in bindings would be cheaper as a 1st board compared to step in... and are plentiful in the used market.

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Flow Schmow. Real men ride in ratchets...Old school Baby... ;)

 

For buying a new board at the right price it has to be Karstadt Sport. Avoid the package deals. the board, bindings and boots together for €299 is possible by delivering substandard bindings and boots.

The good news is as a newbie you will want a pretty soft forgiving board and they are cheaper anyway. You could do worse than a Rossi. I ride a Nitro darkhorse myself (a beast of a board that tells you when it is time to stop and not the other way round), but had a few runs thru on my mates Rossignol last season and it was a fun soft board.

You want a freeride board really or a freestyle if not. Twin Tip with a centred stance.

Tip if you buy from Karstadt Sport first go to Cust Services in Karstadt Oberpollinger and ask them if they have a Einkaufgutschein. They come out 6 times a year usually and they give you another 10%% off aqnything purchased. Karstadt Sport is also a place where you can sometimes get the price knocked down from the ticket price by talking nicely to them.

 

Last Tip. whatever your budget, take €70 off that and GO AND BUY A HELMET. The group i ride with all got a schock last year when our friend stacked it, came down on his head and spent the next 6 months in hospital. He is still not self sufficient. Falling is part of boarding so a helmet is one of the best investments you can make..

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GO AND BUY A HELMET.

Indeed this is true. The number of times my head has smacked the ground hard enough for me to see stars after catching an edge is frightening

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Getting excited just reading this thread. My boarding buddie and I decided we are 100% getting helmets this year. Last year I was off-piste with some twat guide in France that took us through an off-piste slope that was like a bloody minefield of rocks...did not end in tears but could have done...I stacked a couple of times but my head missed anything nasty.

 

My mate later in the season wiped out big style on a standard rock-hard icy piste - again walked away but could have been much grimmer.

 

He has ordered one of these for this year:

 

http://www.k5.com/getproduct.asp?p=7419&s=93&b=56

 

post-544-1132930010.jpg

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wow. all this talk about head injuries is really getting me excited about trying snowboarding this year :unsure:

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The odds are still tiny that you will smack your head - if anything I am concerned that getting a helmet and back protector etc will make us ride quicker! But broken bones usually heal.

 

Worried that the more padding you get, the more invulnerable you can start feeling.

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Thanks, heaps of good advice on here. There's so much to think about!

To sum up the price thing - do you think for a decent 2nd hand board and bindings (without boots) that 130 to 150 would be a pretty fair/good deal? I have seen a few for around this price. I'm thinking better to get a decent used board than a budget new one?

 

And yeah, I think I will have to set some aside for bone & head protection. I have enough trouble crossing an icy street let alone strapping a board to my feet and trying to make it down a mountain. I can almost feel my bones shrinking in fear already.

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wow. all this talk about head injuries is really getting me excited about trying snowboarding this year

No risk, no fun :P

 

But seriously, I don't use a helmet, but I have knovked my head once and it hurt. Skiing is worse for your knees. Generally, I'm fairly careful around ice because that's what hurts. The golden rule in snowboarding is never to go so fast that you feel you have no more control. Unfotunately, easier said than done. And always ride for other people too. It's like being a driver. You have to assume that every other driver on the road is an idiot because more often that not they are. Anticipate other people doing stupid things on the piste.

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The problem with a used board is as a newbie you won't be able to tell how many scrapes (services) it has had and how many times the edges have been taken back. You don't need a flash board as a newbie so rather a budget new board than a knackered second hand one. Bindings can also be fickle. I wouldn't really want to get them secondhand either, but if u see a good set for under €50 maybe that is worth it.

 

Board: 1ßß-150 Karstadt have currently got Burton Clash boards (as do Sport Expert) for €165. A Burton board should be good for a couple of seasons at the very least, but to be honest I don't know the Clash.

 

Bindings Karstadt Oberpollinger had Burton Mission (last years) for €130. A pretty good buy, but you will be ok with a set of Head bindings. Last time I looked Kaufhof am Stachus was knocking some out for about €70.

 

If you need to save somewhere I would try and beg, steal, borrow the jacket and trousers before cutting corners on the kit itself...

 

I didn't mention before. A good thing to know about Karstadt Sport is that you can test the boards! They basically lend you a board for a day or a weekend and charge you a "rental" fee. You can do this a couple or 3 times, figure out what you need, and when you buy theya take the fees you have paid off the Kaufpreis. A very good deal. You get to thrash their boards not your own for a good month and get the board you want without paying anythign for the testing...

 

I think you should also get A SHORTER BOARD. There is a tendancy amongst novice middling riders to ride boards that are unneccessarily long.I guess they think they are getting more for the money when they buy! The classic advice is between chin and nose for board length, but pick up any snowboard mags and the pros are all on shorter boads. Ok length helps a bit off Piste in the deep snow, but it is rubbish to say a small board will sink from under you. You just need to get your weight back a bit more. I would say chin height or just beneath is a good length to go for. all out of advice now. Have fun buying..

 

Nath

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Anticipate other people doing stupid things on the piste.

Better still - stay off the piste!!!

 

Joking apart I am off at the sides at every possible opportunity.

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I can vouch that helmets are nice. Mine is so f'n warm you wouldn't believe it... better than a windstopper fleece hat. And in the unlikely event I hit a tree, my most fragile and important Kopf is protected.

 

This is important when one goes at the top speed possible for the board and snow conditions ;-)

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So it turns out the snowboard boots I bought new are too big for me. They felt fairly tight at the shop but now I have heaps of heel lift which is baaad.

Is this something I can fix by getting some sort of liner or filler? I've heard wearing extra socks isn't a good idea (but I don't know why) - and extra socks isn't really going to fix the problem anyway as I have quite a bit of lift.

Do you think I'll need to buy a new pair or is there a fix I can try out?

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Can you take them back? If they are in pretty good condition still I'd give that a go

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Hmmm, maybe, I'll look into it. I've used them a couple of times though so don't like my chances.

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