Most/least friendly areas of Germany

107 posts in this topic

Our family has lived in Germany now for 5 years of which 3 was spent in Bavaria. It was an awesome place to live. Wurzburg was extremely friendly and we go back monthly to our favorite places and it's like meeting up with old friends again. We have traveled all over and have yet to meet anyone who wasn't kind to us. I have done a lot of traveling with the children on my own and have never felt unsafe or distrustful of anyone here. We are always respectful and kind to the people we meet and I guess we are very lucky to get that in return.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with all the posts that said Frankfurt is a great place to live for a foreigner. The nice thing is, the foreign population is very diverse, and you get to meet people from all over the world.

 

When I think of Germany, "friendly" is not the word I would use. But it is safe here. I lived in the U.S. and Turkey before, in large cities, and have never felt safe walking alone at night until coming here.

 

Has there been hate crimes? Yes, but probably the number is not higher than other countries. What bothers one is rather the government perspective on hate crimes and their sometimes support of hate in the community (e.g. Roland Koch election campaign, lest we forget).

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The former east is generally horrible and east Germans are mostly rude, intolerant people with chips on their shoulders about everything and everyone. Alot of the East Germans I have met have been lazy, unappreciative, undynamic, rude and narrow minded. This is partly a legacy of communism, where everyone was given a job and a flat and told what to do and relied on the state for everything. The GDR was also a country that was closed off to the world, so maybe it isn't surprising that East Germans find foreigners so difficult. Compared with west Germans, the new generation of Ossis mostly has no self initiative. I suppose if your parents grew up and lived in a totalitarian shithole and were thrown on the scrapheap as soon as the wall came down, that's bound to have a negative effect though.

 

Wow. This is one of the most generalized and negative comments. Reading this, I cannot believe that this person has spent much time in Eastern Germany or with East Germans, because it is entirely innacurate. I lived in Cottbus as a foreigner for 2 years, met many people both from the town and from outlying villages, and never in my life before have I met people so friendly, helpful, caring, and who wanted to get to know me better just for that fact that I was a foreignor. I am hoping to move back to Germany in another year, and living in a moderately-sized community in the East is where I most want to be.

 

However, if living in the East, one should probably at least try to fit in. While I never had any troubles with Ausländerfeindlichkeit, Neo-Nazis or the like, I never did anything to stand out. I spoke German whenever possible (Germans love it when you as a foreignor make efforts to learn their language :) and dressed and acted like the locals. I could however forsee that someone who is obviously foreign having a higher likelihood of encountering trouble in some areas, or late at night (although I did have several obviously international friends there who were studying at the BTU who never had any troubles either). However, most East Germans are very happy to meet with or to help a foreign national.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Friendly folk in Heidelberg too. Bonus if you have a sweet curly-haired daughter! Who doesn't love free pretzels?

 

Agreed! I studied in Heidelberg and loved it. I never met a rude person the whole time I was there. There are a huge amount of tourists though :huh:

 

 

I would say the friendliest place is in Frankfurt. (but that's only because I'd betray my own mother for a nice slab of ribs.)

 

:lol:

 

---

 

I honestly didn't meet very many unfriendly people in Germany. A few German friends warned me about East Germany before I took a trip there. I was told that they would be less open to foreigners and whatever else. It was quite the opposite. The people there were VERY nice. The only place where I encountered anti-American things was in Dresden...but it was only a few people and hardly spoiled our trip.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I live right here in Dresden, the East (ost) of germany. Ya right it is all Nazi and racist. I work in a company here with Chinese, black, italian, etc, coworkers. My friend from Canada and the US have been here, taken the transit late at night, and alone with no issues. ME TOO, but I am white.Go to some of the villages and they are pretty friends also. Like anywhere you have cunt faces that speak bullshit and no clue what they are talking about. East if anything has problems with black people more so that they are not as common. There is a lot here though and we are talking about the small minded people with no exposure and who have not been outside a 100KM radius of their village. I kid you not that these people are around. There is many blacks also left over from communist times out of places like Cuba. Learn your history before you spout off!Anyways bigger cities like Berlin I have seen more shady shit that here. Yes I also lived there. However over Canada and Toronto things are a lot more safe. I have yet to see a fight here, Guns shot, or drug deals. Yes it happens but far more rarely and overall people are a lot closer to being humans than resource sucking pigs that have not clue on what it is to be human.

I agree, neo-nazi's and old east, ex-commie die-hard Germans aside, Dresden is hands down the best place in all of Deutschland. While I lived there I made an effort to approach 'unapproachable' people and showed them a different perspective. Some of my best drinking buddies were the older imbiss hangouts who used to observe me with a mix of curiosity and disdain. I took pleasure in 'educating' them on American & Hispanic views. I hope the few I touched will pass on our conversations to their friends and family. Someday I'll re-visit my comrades, including the hard-working vietnamese emmigrants who serve the locals. I have since been visited in America by a handful of Germans I made friends with while in Germany. Once you make a German friend they will be your friends for life.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's great insight Techsmex...I'm getting ready to make a move to a little village called Reinsdorf Niederer Fläming and almost changed my mind until I read your post. I'm also Mexican/American and was a little worried about how people would receive me there. I think you and I have the same attitude in showing people a different perspective of our "kind". Hopefully, they will make their judgments after they've gotten to know me.

 

We recently bought a schloss there and I'm in the process of setting up my soap business. Eventually, I'd like to have a little Mexican restaurant/beirgarten, B&B/hotel, an antique shop and art studio/gallery there too. Lots of work ahead of me!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's see, after 22 years of being here, I've lived in very small villages and large cities. I've also spent short stints in other countries. By comparison, I can't say that Germans are unfriendly. I wonder though, if perhaps this perception comes from their formal style (Sie versus Du) of initial meeting. I find Germans to be quite friendly when you engage them in conversation.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bavaria... Munich to Regensburg is 100% awesome. BTW , there is an American Diner in Regensburg that seems to be doing quite well. Bring BBQ and they will come!!! I have had absolutely no problem with being a foreigner here and the people are wonderful. Engaging and funny, when you get by the direct and blunt presentation they have. At least you know where you stand. The evidence was clear to me when I was in a small town " Kirchberg am Wald" in the Bayerischerwald and the whole town was in the beer tent. No fights, laughing and signing American Rock & Roll. I even had a beer with the local priest from India.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some fairly stupid generalizations being thrown around here. I live in Dresden and I've never had a problem here. I'm a Hispanic dude from Texas and aside from a curious look here and there, I've met some really nice people here. Truth is, being an asshole is an equal opportunity occupation that knows no ethnicity. You have neo nazis in America too you know. Whenever people ask me where I'm from, I always say I'm from Texas. Most Germans love it and always say "cool" and always leave with a smile. On the other hand I've met some west Germans that acted like their shit don't stink. I've been to Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt, and a few other areas of Germany. Out of all of them I like Dresden best.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The former east is generally horrible and east Germans are mostly rude, intolerant people with chips on their shoulders about everything and everyone. Alot of the East Germans I have met have been lazy, unappreciative, undynamic, rude and narrow minded. This is partly a legacy of communism, where everyone was given a job and a flat and told what to do and relied on the state for everything. The GDR was also a country that was closed off to the world, so maybe it isn't surprising that East Germans find foreigners so difficult. Compared with west Germans, the new generation of Ossis mostly has no self initiative. I suppose if your parents grew up and lived in a totalitarian shithole and were thrown on the scrapheap as soon as the wall came down, that's bound to have a negative effect though.

 

Funny, lately these old horrible, rude, unappreciative and lazy Germans have been pretty nice. While they don't smile so much at me, they do a lot at my daughter. The give her all kinds of little treats here and there, mostly chocolate. And they think it is absolutely 100% wonderful that my daughter is growing up learning two languages.

 

I might of heard a comment the other day that it is better having Americans here than a city full of Turks like Frankfurt Am Main, but he was an escapee from the East and has spent 40 years in the West. So I guess he doesn't really count as a racist Ossi, I guess he is a racist Wessi then.

 

The people don't open up to you right away, that is for sure. Once they see you around, or find out how long you have been living here it is totally different. I have heard all kinds of stories, and I don't find the DDR to be so evil. Everyone had a job, they had something to do, other than sitting in front of the TV all day collecting HarzIV money. They didn't have to worry about food, or about being homeless. Some people lost their whole lives when the wall fell. The peope have adopted western ideas about materialism (I am american come on...this is damn true) and selfishness, and no longer think about others or help them. People all new each other and everyone had just about the same thing. No jealousy...Anyways...maybe my evil horrible rude and cold east German family has brain washed me. Oh that and all the locals. Life was different...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Some fairly stupid generalizations being thrown around here. I live in Dresden and I've never had a problem here. I'm a Hispanic dude from Texas and aside from a curious look here and there, I've met some really nice people here. Truth is, being an asshole is an equal opportunity occupation that knows no ethnicity. You have neo nazis in America too you know. Whenever people ask me where I'm from, I always say I'm from Texas. Most Germans love it and always say "cool" and always leave with a smile. On the other hand I've met some west Germans that acted like their shit don't stink. I've been to Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt, and a few other areas of Germany. Out of all of them I like Dresden best.

 

I sort of think there are more Neo Nazis in the US. Then add them in with other well known open racist and it is by far more than here in Germany.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Whenever people ask me where I'm from, I always say I'm from Texas. Most Germans love it and always say "cool" and always leave with a smile.

 

Before or after you get the litany of insipidly stupid stereotypical questions about your experiences as a cowboy?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Before or after you get the litany of insipidly stupid stereotypical questions about your experiences as a cowboy?

 

Or about old Georgie?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny I got both generalizations in one conversation on Sunday at the AC-DC concert. Then the conversation turned to soccer and both those German dudes said, "We love the U.S. but we hate England. Go U.S.A"

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I spoke of Goerlitz. Most of the German side is an absolute dump. They made the border area look beautiful and impressive, but in a radius around the train station, it's literally a ghost town, with blocks and streets of empty, abandoned stores. One doesn't need to look to far to see there is clashing there between the nazis that live there and openly preach, as well as spray their propaganda on walls, and anti-nazi protesters who try to advertise protests against them. I have some pictures from my visits there. Overall, Gorlitz is a dump, with some minor ok blocks, but it's not a great place to live, nor have a stable business, and it's miles away from anything in Germany.

 

I respectfully disagree with your assessment of Görlitz. The buildings are an excellent example of Prussian architecure. The astrological clock, viaduct, market square and a couple of large parks are worth the trip. The other side of the Neisse provides an interesting perspective having developed under a different government. Wikipedia refers to it as the "Heidelberg of the east" which might be an exaggeration, but i would not call it a dump. I have visited 7 times in the past 10 years, the last time just two weekends ago while riding the Oder-Neisse Radweg.

 

Your remarks on Dresden and anti-American sentiment are interesting. Back in 2000, I lived in Dresden for 4 months and thought it was absolutely great with really friendly people.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Or about old Georgie?

 

I always remind the Europeans (and yankees back home in the states) that he and his degenerate family are from connecticut.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole question is a bit dumb really, people react to you and what you bring with you...

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I don't think it's a dumb question. Having lived in two places, I find the area where I live now (a small town in the southern part of Niedersachsen) to be friendlier than the previous place (a larger town but not big city in NRW). This applies to the superficial courtesy of people on the street and in shops. After they get to know you, either personally or as a regular customer, then I'd agree about reaction to "what you bring with you." As to the superficial courtesy of people in shops, it has improved during the dozen years I've been here. Maybe someone did a study showing that the stores make more money when the clerks are nice to customers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The people in Berlin were more friendlier than the people in Munich. When I got ready to approach some people for directions some shook their head no before I could say anything on several occasions. I got some really strange hard stares from people that creeped me out. And some of the people downtown in their fancy cars are so impatient that they will run you over even if you are old. I witnessed this when I was on a walking tour. Some people were nice but I felt some cold and uptightness from some people. This was my 4th time vacationing in Europe and Munich was different then what I read and expected. I will say that Munich is pretty and green and I loved the architecture. Next year I wanted to try Hamburg or Frankfurt and I would like to go to Vienna, Austria. I`ve heard Austrians can be rude but would I love to see the city for it architecture.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my friends here in Frankfurt likes to tell the story of what life was like for her in Munich. As a new mom, she would go to playgrounds and all the other moms would be there, quite smartly dressed, but they would never want to talk. She said it was awful, the woman were so cold and unfriendly. Her German husband was a professor and the wives just shut her out completely. Needless to say, she didn't enjoy living in Munich very much. Then, she moved to Frankfurt and what a difference it was here. People were friendly, moms on the playground struck up conversations and she said she finally started enjoying living in Germany. She said it was mainly cause everyone was from someplace else, a whole batch of different foreigners. Maybe that is why it gets friendlier?

 

I almost found it hard to believe that people were unfriendly to her as she is a very open, intelligent, humourous woman. Haven't spent any time in Munich, so don't know if her experiences are common or not.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now