Having a full medical check-up

36 posts in this topic

14 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

Two years ago a little cyst was found in my skull (MRI).

 

Curious, what prompted the MRI?

 

I had an inner ear infection and the ENT doc sent me for an MRI just to make sure nothing else was going on up there. They found an aneurysm - totally unrelated to my infection. So that doc saved my life by being thorough. I would have never been referred for an MRI in the U.S. from an obvious inner ear infection.

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1 minute ago, fraufruit said:

 

Curious, what prompted the MRI?

I would have never been referred for an MRI in the U.S. from an obvious inner ear infection.

I would have to disagree and say that would depend on who you had for a doctor and what was suspected.  Our family has always gone to very good providers.  

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I had a tinnitus and the doctor wanted to exclude tat something was wrong in the ear cannel.

(I still have waek form of tinnitus, but it doesn#t disturb me too much)

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In the US there are actually too many unnecessary invasive tests, such as MRIs, being provided.  The cases you have described warrant things, but our problem is overtesting. And that is because that is where the real money is!  It is also prompted by doctors fearing lawsuits.  Because they will have their asses sued by missing something that is otherwise statistically insignificant.  Hospitals love to test to pay for their fancy machines.  Overtesting is a real drain on Medicare too.  This is one of several reasons that US healthcare costs are such a significant portion of GDP.

 

„Addressing overtreatment can have a major impact on rising health care costs in the US. Using the IOM's estimate of excess costs arising from overtreatment,[1] a 50% reduction in “unnecessary services” would result in $105 billion in savings each year, or about 4% of total national healthcare spending.“

from NCBI  September 2017

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5 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

In the US there are actually too many unnecessary invasive tests, such as MRIs, being provided.

 

But only for those who are insured and can afford the co-pays. Uninsured people don't get the same treatments.

 

A big part of the rising health care costs are the costs themselves. In general, testing and scans are about 80% cheaper over here. In the U.S., the costs are all over the place depending on where one lives. Just read that most pharmaceutical drugs got another price bump for the new year, too. Why do people in other countries pay less that half for the same drug than Americans pay?

 

The whole system over there is FUBAR.

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15 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

But only for those who are insured and can afford the co-pays. Uninsured people don't get the same treatments.

 

A big part of the rising health care costs are the costs themselves. In general, testing and scans are about 80% cheaper over here. In the U.S., the costs are all over the place depending on where one lives. Just read that most pharmaceutical drugs got another price bump for the new year, too. Why do people in other countries pay less that half for the same drug than Americans pay?

 

The whole system over there is FUBAR.

The reasons are myriad and complicated. We fund and invent more drugs, which benefits the world, but the prices are unregulated.  A middle ground needs to be reached so that innovation isn’t stifled but prices for US citizens are reasonable.  MY BIL used to drive from NY to Canada to get drugs for my MIL at cheaper rates.  BAD!  Testing and Scans are cheaper in Germany because prices are regulated.  In the US insurance companies are charging different prices for different groups, because they can, and cross subsidization is occurring.  Hospitals can do what they want and are using testing as a money maker.

 

The exception to regulated prices is Medicare.  Medicare regulates prices on everything.   And hence many doctors refuse to take Medicare patients, just as German doctors can refuse to take publically insured patients (where I live, on the Swiss border, we have scores of dentists and doctors who only take privately insured and out-of-pocket „rich“ Swiss payers). So now we have a doctor shortage for the elderly and disabled going on too.

 

Uninsured people can go to the hospital and get the tests, and often do.  Then they will be bankrupted when they can’t pay. And in turn the insured folks will be paying more to subsidize the uninsured.  Once again, things aren’t regulated.  Here in Germany everything is tightly regulated.  Americans resist regulation to a fault.  I think the trick is to have healthy regulation, but now we have gone so far down this track that it’s become difficult to convince people that something else may be better.

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30 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

" invasive tests, such as MRIs, ".

I did not noticed anything.

MRI is as invasive as photography

 

31 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

" invasive tests, such as MRIs, ".

I did not noticed anything.

MRI is as invasive as photography.

Invasive Diagnostics

An invasive diagnostic test is any type of medical test that requires physicians to use instrumentation to physically enter the body. The instrument can be very small and relatively pain free, as is the case with taking a blood sample, or more involved, as with a biopsy.

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7 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

In contrast to the coloscopy I can assure you that only a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla (not the car) and radio waves of appr. 50MHz entered my body.

Except me nobody else was in the examination room.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/30/science/with-dogs-its-what-you-say-and-how-you-say-it.html

 

Glad that went so well.  My elderly MIL couldn’t tolerate the lying still and they had to leave without her completing it.  And yes I’m sure an MRI is preferable to a colonoscopy 😂, but I would rather keep that colon cancer at bay.  I still have nightmares about what my dad went through. 😥

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It’s not. I realized that I made a mistake calling it invasive.  A blood test is invasive.  However, interestingly, many people can tolerate a blood test but not an MRI. 
 

But it’s overused in the US and expensive:

An MRI scan is one of the more expensive individual procedures a hospital can run. More challenging, the costs of an MRI scan can vary widely. According to data gathered by NerdWallet, an average MRI scan costs $2,600.May 29, 2019
 

As Fraufruit said US healthcare is FUBAR.  I worked in it for 20 years and saw all manner of crazy shit.  🤪

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47 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

In contrast to the coloscopy I can assure you that only a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla (not the car) and radio waves of appr. 50MHz entered my body.

51rLvsNAFcL__AC_.jpg.d908ebab69cd988911e

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Are those prices what the insurance has to pay or the patient? I've never had to pay anything for them and I've had quite a few.

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26 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Are those prices what the insurance has to pay or the patient? I've never had to pay anything for them and I've had quite a few.

It means the average cost charged. But how much you pay varies by insurance. That’s why it’s an average. That’s parting what’s screwed up. 

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