Finding ANY jobs in Berlin: Tips for non-German speakers

1,061 posts in this topic

 

So ecleary can't read either.

 

Ah good point. I meant that Paul (Paulbb) found work. Like he said, he found 4 jobs in the last two years.

 

Matthew, and anyone else thinking of coming here. I also live in Berlin and have done for the last year, and it's not as bad as some people would have you believe. I reaffirm that if you are willing to do more menial jobs initially, you can easily find work. And it is worth coming here and giving it a shot for 6 months(again do come with savings). If it doesn't work out, so what. You can always go back home. We live in a world where travelling no longer costs the earth. Berlin is a great city to live in, so it's worth a try. I'm sure some people disagree with that, but it's simply a matter of opinion.

 

Evan

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es ist nicht das ich kein deutsch kann, im gegenteil, meine punkt ist eher, dass eine muss PERFEKT deutsch lesen, schrieben, und sprechen können., und wie perfekt deutsch definiert wird ist oft willkürich und wird aus anderen motivationgrunde hervorgerufen. . sogar gab es eine neue studium über dem anna will was gesagt hat...

Oy oy oy. After reading this I checked your profile and was very surprised to find out that you've lived here for 10 years.

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I suppose this poor in Berlin thread is as good as any ...

 

Bauhaus Tempelhof (Albionstr. 18) are looking for assistance for their stock inventory on the 25.11 (or were at 19:00 this evening). So any trustafarians, hippies, asshats and associated Berliner expat paupers hoping to stock up on beer tokens should rock on down with their passport, health insurance card, social insurance number, work permit (including the EU one beginning with F that I cannot be bothered to type) to the main information desk and ask if they still need anyone. They are paying on a 400 yoyo basis so a tax card is apparently not necessary - although I doubt you will get 400 euros for counting some toilet seats. There are no advertised job requirements.

 

You're welcome. :D

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Hello,

 

I'm moving to Berlin in April but am worried about how I will support myself. Is it easy to find a job in Berlin? I'll do anything, work in a bar, restaurant, shop, cleaner. Anything to support myself. I have been learning German for the past 10 months but I am still not confident with speaking it. I am sure I will pick it up a lot faster once i'm over there but initially I will need to support myself with a job!

 

Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated? Also, any information on average wages would be great.

 

Many thanks

Kevin

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

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it said that the application will be closed at 31.01.10, i just checked the website once more and they already delete the job advertisement. What the hell is happen? I already sent my application and received no answer. I was content as i'm under assumption that i won't hearing news until 31.01.10 but not anymore...is this means that the job is already gone? they already have someone for this position??

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Can I just add to this thread that Berlin is also made up of a lot of Germans who have moved here elsewhere in Germany. In fact all of my German friends, bar one, moved to Berlin at some point from somewhere else.

 

All of them had: fluent German, qualifications, Ausbildungen, work experience. All of them said their first few years here were a nightmare in terms of finding work and integrating into the city to the point where they felt settled. One friend has had to move to Munich because things have gotten so bad here work-wise, another is commuting to Hamburg, another is talking of moving to Hamburg and another must now work in Stuttgart but still hoping she'll get work in Berlin.

 

My point is that these people are natives, have the language and even they have found Berlin a difficult place to find work in. When you are a foreigner, without the language hoping to arrive and pick up some kind of job, things will of course be much more difficult for you.

 

My advice would be to stay where you are, enroll in an intensive German course (it is not the easiest languages to learn what with all the complicated grammar rules and articles and pronunciation of certain words), and while doing all that apply for jobs from where you are. Come here only when you have a job secured.

 

Honestly the knowing German is the key - or rather not the key, but even if it is only conversational German with bad grammar, it makes your life much easier, you can at least understand the jobs advertised, you can converse with people over the phone. Unfortunately for me, I've spent 9 months in an intensive German course and although I am the best in the class :rolleyes: all this course has served to make me realise is that it is going to take me a hell of a long time until I am actually fluent enough to apply for jobs that require fluent English and German. So, just beware that learning German is a on-going process that is not done over a few months (unless I'm totally thick and slow on the uptake).

 

I work part time now and must do some of my work in German and hell, I freak out every time I have to write the simplest thing in case I'm making my company look bad with my grammatical errors, it is so much more stressful than if my German was at a more fluent level - so bear that in mind as well, struggling in a new town, working in a job, but also trying to do that job partly in a foreign language adds a lot of stress that you wouldn't normally have.

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Perhaps it depends on what kind of job one is looking for, Edee. As stated in the title of this thread, the question was how can one find "any" job in Berlin. If your friends are moving to where the money is, then they're not looking for "any" jobs--they're looking for proper jobs in the fields in which they are trained and/or educated.

 

I am also not be too terribly surprised to hear that Germans are complaining about the lack of jobs, as it seems that most people here finish university not having even the faintest clue how to write a resume--much less how to find openings and convince people to hire them--as they've been supported either by their families or the government for their entire lives and never really needed to know how to present themselves to employers.

 

Regardless of what type of job one is looking for or the economic state of the city in which one is looking, one will need to:

 

know how and where to look for a job

know how to write an attention-grabbing cover letter

know how to conduct oneself during interview

have the drive to keep looking and sending off resumes and keep looking and sending off resumes and keep looking and sending until one has a job, without ever once throwing up one's hands and puffing one's lips out and protesting that the system is simply against them

 

The economic downturn is an excuse. During the 90s in Seattle--probably the city's most prosperous times since logging--you'd hear the same. damn. complaints. You'd hear that either no one was hiring, or no one was advertising, or that you had to have a foot in the door to get any decent sort of job. But it wasn't the case.

 

People who knew they would get jobs, got jobs. People who "knew" it was impossible, didn't get jobs.

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Hmm, I know of a job here for an english speaker, maybe two people ; french/spanish useful but not essential, german not essential, possible accommodation included, flexible hours for work/study etc. Is it rare?

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Actually I think zxmzz14 has a point. Germans have a problem with integrating foreigner workers in general in my experience and especially treating them as equals. They are yet to get over viewing most foreigners as being 'Gastarbeiter' and have a problem with accepting multiculturalism in general. I have often heard Germans who are well educated using the word 'multikulti' to describe cities like Berlin, Hamburg and Frankfurt as if 'multikulti' was something extremely undesirable. I also work with middle class educated Germans who would never, ever make friends with a Turkish person or even talk to one. A few years ago at a work party, the Turkish cleaning staff came a long and literally none of the Germans talked to them, so I chatted to them. It was frankly mortifying. Unfortunately, I have noticed that a lot of Germans are also very rude to American people. I think the Eastern half of the country is particularly bad for this as until 1990 they were brought up to view Americans as the enemy, and these attitudes are passed down and take a long time to go away.

 

I concur. I can see the effort German government puts into this glorified Multikulti and all the help immigrants can get from the state to promote it, but the Germans don't seem to be willing to welcome non-Germans in general. It's easy to blame the people, but isn't it really a fault of their government not listening to the people and deceiving foreigners that Germany, especially a large city like Berlin is a multicultural society? I mean I'm pretty sure they enjoying having tourists from around the world coming to Berlin dropping major $$$ there without scaring Germans of losing jobs to foreigners. but beyond that, it's unfair to expect more from the Germans, no? if you ask Germans if they actually NEED foreigners in Germany, regardless of what Angela Merkel tells you, I bet most of them will say NO! it's not that they hate foreigners, but Germany isn't a a country based or founded on immigration. After all, it's not America or Canada. Sure they might need more IT people for example, but with all the free universities available to Germans and immigrants, they really can't find locals to fill the IT positions?

 

when I went to Berlin last Summer, a cab driver happened to be a Turk, or I thought he was. I asked him how he liked it there, his answer was, he was born there! he's a Turkish German. but he said he just couldn't integrate into German society because of cold-hearted, close minded, racist German mentality, never felt at home in his own country. now that sounds like an excuse by a typical Turkish loser, but is that his fault for not trying harder or Germans not letting others live there?

 

when I'm watching the Olympics, I can relate to the Canadian athletes. some are Caucasian, some are black, some are Asian, etc., no matter what their backgrounds may be, they are representing the country, and the people in Canada, or the States for that matter, regardless of the race, everyone is cheering for their athletes. now I really don't know how the Turkish Germans feel about German athletes.

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European countries just have a very different sense of who is their countryman and who isn't. They are not based on immigration like Canada or the US and so they go by heritage. If you are not of their heritage, then you are a foreigner. That can apply even if you are born there and speak the language perfectly as long as you look like you might be a foreigner and/or have a foreign sounding name. That may not be taken to mean that they are not nice to you or don't accept you but you will just never be seen as German.

 

For us, it is a choice to move here. For the Turkish-Germans who were brought here by their parents as children or even born here, it was not a choice and I can well understand that they might not feel like they have a country to call home. After all, they are not really seen as Germans and they are not really Turkish either. However, at least they have a large community here where they all have that in common.

 

As for finding jobs, there are loads of jobs out there. There are jobs that the unemployed Germans can't do because they trained for something else at age 16 and it's unthinkable for them to change their career and there are jobs that they don't want to do because they are unskilled jobs and it's unthinkable for many who have a trade or education to go down to the lowly worker level. My German is getting better but it's still pretty low level and I found a job. It pays enough for myself and I am happy with it. If the unemployed Germans want my job, why are they not applying for it? I am told the unemployment rate is 10% where I live and I work with some people whose German is even worse than mine.

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Don't know why you revived this thread, but it's certainly interesting reading:

 

"Abandon hope, all ye who enter here"

 

Almost sounds like the BNP back home in London. What do you reckon to that Toytown?

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There are plenty of jobs here, question is if you get the papers. I hear you speak french and you are French Canadian? I'm not sure but if you have the right to work

in France as a "French Canadian" then you have the right to work in Germany because they are both part of the European Union. Also, never be discouraged by

unfriendly people. You are young and are entiteld to do stupid things - I have, and ended up at the stranges places; And the cool part ... I survived it all.

Good Luck to ya and always give it your best.

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After reading this two things strike me:

 

1. Here are as many obnoxious twits as on the Munich forum

 

2. Why do you think you can get a job if you don't speak the language? I'm moving to the US in a month and I wouldn't have thought about applying without any decent language skills. The point is in any job you have to interact with people - even if you just sit on your computer. There are colleagues you'd have to talk to for a start. If you can't interact with them why should someone hire you? Stop complaining and either learn German or go to a different country where it is apparently easier. Besides has someone ever tried to get a visa for the US? They're not more welcoming than Germany. The difference is most people speak English. So it's easier to get around. I've friends and colleagues in Munich who have been living here for ages and barely speak German but that's because you can get around with it here. Don't know about Berlin. Since it doesn't have any headquarters of any major company (anymore) I guess it's less international - the political life left aside.

But be it as it may, if you can't find a job just move on, there are plenty of cities in Germany and there are other countries.

 

On a side note: In a older post in this thread one explained that people from eastern Germany may be impolite towards Americans because we grew up behind a wall and they were our enemy. I don't think we would describe all Americans as bible-bashing, gun-waving moral hypocrites because of their history of the past decade - now would we?

 

Cheers,

Holger

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When I first came here, I didn't think I could get a job, thought I was useless and wallowed in self pity.

 

Then I got work, worked a bit, then got better work and so on.

 

Now I'm very happy and working in a decent paid job.

 

Basically if you can't find work here after wallowing in the self pity and despair, then you're useless. Sorry.

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I remember reading your threads when things were sh!t for you simmie, glad to hear things worked out for you, you were prepared to do the hard work and it's paid off. Sitting around not learning German all day is a sure fire way not to impress a potential German employer.

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