Berlin ranks among top global cities

189 posts in this topic

The last headline is particularly inane. Who would think it's a good idea to travel to Berlin (or anywhere else) to party because you are broke and in debt?

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13 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

With all of the treads that get closed, it is bizarre that his remain.

 

True, but at least let's acknowledge sheer persistence in the face of supreme indifference - this thread started back in October 2009!!!!!!

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3 hours ago, john_b said:

 

True, but at least let's acknowledge sheer persistence in the face of supreme indifference - this thread started back in October 2009!!!!!!

 

BH-gif.gif

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Here is the full list of the 20 best startup ecosystems in the world according to Startup Genome:

 

rocket-icons-start-up-launch-symbol-new-

 

 

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Silicon Valley (unchanged)

New York City (unchanged)

London (up from #6)

Beijing (new entry)

Boston (down from #4)

Tel Aviv (down from #5)

Berlin (up from #9)

Shanghai (new entry)

Los Angeles (down from #3)

Seattle (down from #8)

Paris (unchanged)

Singapore (down from #10)

Austin (up from #14)

Stockholm (new entry)

Vancouver (up from #18)

Toronto – greater Waterloo area (up from #17)

Sydney (down from #16)

Chicago (down from #7)

Amsterdam (unchanged)

Bangalore (down from #15)

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Erdmann said:

 

Drugs and Frankfurt, Women Safety and Köln, Salafists and Berlin...Pretty accurate list.

Beer and Munich...not in Top 20 ?.

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9 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Beer and Munich...not in Top 20 ?.

 

Indeed. :lol:

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Millennial Cities Ranking
Nestpick

Millennials are often defined by their affinity with technology, their entrepreneurial mindset, and their revitalising effects on cities. For all their positive attributes, this demographic is also well-documented for their highly expectant standards, and will not stay long in a location that doesn’t match their criteria.

Each year, students and young professionals flock from their home towns, suburbs and villages to find work and apartments in vibrant cities. But which cities actually offer the most for millennials? At Nestpick, we help people of all ages relocate to some of the most exciting cities in the world, and our role has given us key insights into not only the migration patterns of millennials, but also the potential suitability of cities for the demographic. We studied thousands of cities to hand-pick 100 places considered to be millennial dream destinations. We then ranked them by relevant factors to compile the ultimate Millennial City Ranking

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1    Amsterdam    
2    Berlin    
3    München    
4    Lissabon    
5    Antwerpen    
6    Barcelona    
7    Lyon    
8    Köln
9    Paris    
10    Vancouver

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This week Deutsche Bank released its annual "Mapping the world's prices" report, 
cataloguing the cost of goods and services in a cross section of the world's biggest and most powerful cities around the world.

 

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In 2017, for the first time, Deutsche Bank has included a ranking of the quality of life in 47 cities around the world. The ranking is based on eight sub-indexes compiled by crowd-sourced information database Numbeo, which create a broad picture of what it is like to live in different cities.

 

 

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1. Wellington, New Zealand

2. Edinburgh, Scotland

3. Vienna, Austria

4. Melbourne, Australia

5. Zurich, Switzerland

6. Copenhagen, Denmark

7. Ottawa, Canada

8. Boston, United States

9. Amsterdam, Netherlands

10. Sydney, Australia

11. Germany, Berlin

 

 

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Is the city of Berlin paying you to make these posts?

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IESE Cities in Motion Index 2017 - PDF
(From a Spanish University)

 

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New York City-USA

London-United Kingdom 

Paris-France 

Boston-USA

San Francisco-USA 

Washington, D.C.-USA 

Seoul-South Korea 

Tokyo-Japan 

Berlin-Germany (+2)

Amsterdam-Netherlands 

Toronto-Canada 

Chicago-USA 

Zurich-Switzerland 

Melbourne-Australia 

Vienna-Austria 

Sydney-Australia 

Geneva-Switzerland 

Los Angeles-USA 

Munich-Germany 

Baltimore-USA

 

 

 

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Berlin No 3. : Monocle Quality of Life Ranking
(London Magazine)

 

1.Tokyo
2.Vienna
3.Berlin & Munich
5.Melbourne
6.Copenhagen
7.Sydney
8.Zurich
9.Hamburg
10.Madrid

 

 

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03. Berlin: Truly public spaces

 

Until just a few years ago, Berlin’s quality of life was measured mostly by its cost of living. Thanks to an overabundance of residential buildings, rents were laughably cheap, attracting creative types from all over the world seeking freedom from financial pressures. The boon has since ended and the hype has passed but the city has maintained its position in our rankings. Why?

 

Maybe the most important factor is that there isn’t one Berlin. Each district has such a distinct flavour that travelling from leafy Zehlendorf to glossy Mitte and on to rugged Neukölln feels like visiting completely different cities. (Thanks to good public transport and bike and car-sharing options, this is easy.) The variety has led to intense loyalties around neighbourhoods and, for a city of 3.5 million people, it can feel surprisingly village-like.

 

Berlin is also one of Europe’s most multicultural cities: more than half of its residents aren’t native to the city. Not only is English spoken nearly everywhere but in many cafés in Mitte, Kreuzberg and Neukölln it is the official language, as the requirement for staff to know German is increasingly redundant. The reason may be that their bosses don’t speak it either: despite Germany’s reputation for bureaucracy, opening a business in Berlin usually requires just one visit to a public office and paperwork is available in many languages.

Berlin’s defining feature used to be the presence of world history on every corner; today the ubiquity of great restaurants seems like a more important characteristic. From a city that used to dance, Berlin has become a city that eats. Food now attracts more creative energy than the many technology start-ups that dominated Berlin a few years ago.

 

Lacking the legacy industries of other German urban centres, Berlin has done much to support entrepreneurialism and subsidise culture. The result is that it’s the world’s only city with three opera houses, many of Germany’s most cutting-edge theatres and a museum that houses everything from ancient artifacts to quirky industrial objects.


Still, Berlin is at its best when the government keeps its distance. A legacy of the post-reunification anarchy is the strong sense of ownership residents have over their city. Most parks don’t close at night, the curfew for bars still seems to depend on what they negotiate with their neighbours and residents regularly turn the spaces around trees in the street into miniature gardens. This understanding that public space truly belongs to everybody has given Berlin a strong sense of freedom. And it survives in an age when many other cities are experiencing security clampdowns. The British embassy continues to be more heavily guarded than Angela Merkel’s private residence, which is recognisable only by two police officers strolling the vicinity.

 

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