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The Falcon Tower/Falkenturm & the Pappenheimers

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I have been doing a bit of research on Medieval Munich and found reference to a thing called "The Falcon Tower". I think that this was somewhere near Karls Tor but I can't be sure.

I know that very little of the old town defences remain but does anyone know where exactly this tower was?

 

All ideas much appreciated,

 

Taff

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I guess you're looking for the Falkenturm (here are some paintings of it).

 

Falkenturmstr, near Maximilianstr, is named after it, but according to this website it was actually located near the Residenz, roughly where the steps of the Nationaltheater now are.

 

 

Unweit der "Neuveste", der Residenz, befand sich am nordöstlichen Stadtrand - etwa an der Stelle der Treppe zum Nationaltheater - der sogenannte Falkenturm.

Erbaut um 1450, stellte er als Bestandteil der Stadtmauer eines der zahlreichen Befestigungswerke des Münchner Ringwalles dar und war zu diesem Zweck mit Schießscharten und kleinen, wehrgangbesetzten Vortürmen versehen. Eine Besonderheit des Gebäudes bestand darin, dass es einen ausgebauten Dachstuhl mit einem schräg auf allen vier Seiten aufsteigenden Giebel besaß, welcher an den Stirnseiten mit Erkern besetzt war. Der Name der Turms verweist auf seine ursprüngliche Funktion als Aufbewahrungsort von Utensilien, die zur herzoglichen Falkenjagd benötigt wurden. Doch seit ungefähr 1520 brachte man in dem Turm, der als ausbruchssicher galt, Schwerverbrecher unter, Gefangene des Landesherrn.

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Thanks for that deco. I have not read through all that website link, but it is precisely for the mentioned Pappenheimer trial that I am researching this. It was my understanding that the Pappenheimers were tortured here (Falkenturm)and then on the day of execution, led through Neuhauser Tor (where they were allowed to pray and even drink some wine) before being taken to Marienplatz/Schrannenplatz for the final act. If the tower was where the link you gave was then (and no reason to doubt it) logically it makes no sense to drive a couple of horse and carts out of the way up to what is now Karls Tor and then down to Marienplatz. It only makes sense if we maybe consider that going around the long was intended to prolong the spectacle - the family were severely messed up by now - Anna Pampenheimer had actually had her breasts cut off by this point - and also if we consider that tradition stated that the condemned had to pass through Karls Tor and receive a gift of wine from town officials.

 

Not a nice tale :(

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Just read the whole of the website's page, and it does make gruesome reading. It reports a slightly different order of events & final destination though.

 

The vagrant family (mother, father, 2 grown sons and one 10 year-old son) had been transferred to Munich and interrogated in the tower's torture chamber, where they consequently admitted to a whole string of crimes including witchcraft.

 

After a show trial at the Altes Rathaus in Marienplatz (where the toy museum's now located), the condemned were tortured and then transported via Neuhauser Tor (i.e. Karlsplatz) to gallows' hill, somewhere between the Theresienwiese and Hackerbrücke, where they were tortured further before being burned alive. The youngest son had to watch it all and was put to death some months later.

 

 

Noch auf dem Marienplatz wurden die Angeklagten sechsmal mit glühenden Zangen gerissen, Anna Gämperl wurden die beiden Brüste abgeschnitten und diese ihren Söhnen "um's Maul gerieben", bevor die Verurteilten auf zwei Wägen in einem Zug zur Richtsstatt gefahren wurden. Der Weg führte zum Neuhauser Tor hinaus zum Galgenberg, der außerhalb des Burgfriedens in etwa zwischen der heutigen Theresienwiese und der Hackerbrücke lag. Dort wurden die Verurteilten gerädert, Paulus Gämperl gepfählt und alle schließlich lebendig verbrannt. Zahlreiche Berichte und Flugblätter belegen, dass der Prozeß das gewünschte Aufsehen erregte, da die Hinrichtungsformen sogar für damalige Verhältnisse als besonders brutal empfunden wurden.

 

It was deemed brutal even for its time and it looks as though it didn't really have much to do with witchcraft. The family had been used to set an example in an attempt to put off would-be thieves, murderers and other criminals in the countryside.

 

 

Der weitere Verlauf dieses Falles wird zeigen, dass eine bestimmte Intention seiner Verhandlung zugrunde lag: Herzog Maximilian tat sich zwar hervor durch eine strikte Reglementierung des Alltagslebens seiner Untertanen, indem er Polizeimandate wie beispielsweise die Kleiderordnung oder Erlasse gegen das "heillose Gesindel" auf der Straße herausgab. Jedoch war eine Kontrolle über die Ausführung dieser Mandate v.a. außerhalb der Stadt nahezu unmöglich. Dementsprechend unsicher war die Situation auf dem Lande. Morde, Raubüberfälle und Brandschatzungen waren an der Tagesordnung. Das einzige mögliche Mittel gegen diese Kriminalität schien die Abschreckung der landschädlichen Räuber und Brenner durch einen Schauprozeß gegen eben solches "Gesindel" zu sein.
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In a recent book - "Highroad to the stake" (Kunze) it mentions the youngest son Hansel (in some accounts his name is Hoel) being on the Sheriff's horse. The Sheriff rode with the boy as he was under orders to make notes of what the kid said - looking for more evidence. When they got to the Schoenes Turm, they were greeted by a half-mile long throng of people leading to the market place. On seeing all these people, the dazed and truamatised kid said (or at least was reported to have said) "look at all these men at arms that have turned out for my mother and fathers wedding...even the Duke himself does not have so many" (the fact that the kid didn't really grasp what was going on - or was in shock as he had been tortured and beaten with a cane as well was not taken into account when it came to burning him alive. He was 10 years old). My understanding was that they left the Falcon Turm where they had been tortured and Anna mutilated. The stop at Neuhauser Tor to pray and drink whilst the kid is furter down the street ny the Schoenes Turm/St Mikes. The procession with the prisoners make their way down to marienplatz. Once here the men are further tortured by having their arms broken with the wheel. The father, Paulus was then impaled 9but not to the extent that he would die from this. Then they were put on to the pyres and burned alive (along with two other unrelated unfortunates, a farmer and a tailor) with the youngster watching. Anna, despite massive blood loss was still alive when they set fire to her as her son was recorded as screaming "look...my mother is squirming"

 

The English language texts point at Marienplatz being the place of execution but perhaps the German language texts are more reliable? Perhaps I should pay a visit to the Stadtarchiv.

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The website article's author, Kathrin Brunner, mentions two of Kunze's books as sources. Maybe you could try contacting her first? Her email address is provided on the website, although it may not be valid any more since the article was written in 2000.

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The "Pappenheimers" was the nickname given to a family of travellers (real name Pämb or Gämperl) who were arrested ostensibly for witchcraft in 1600 after being denounced by a thief. They made their living by travelling around the countryside cleaning out privies, glazing, and begging. Their trial and death was an attempt by Duke Maximilian I to control crime in the countryside, and the brutality involved made sure that it was talked about.

 

Edit: Just found an online comment that states that "Pappenheimer" was the name given to people in the Middle Ages who were responsible for dealing with rubbish and privies.

 

 

Pappenheimer sind die Müllmänner des Mittelalters. So wurden die Knechte, die in Nürnberg Dreck und Fäkalien von den Straßen entfernt haben kurzerhand, unabhängig von ihrer Herkunft Pappenheimer genannt und wegen Ihres Geruches entsprechend verachtet und auf Abstand gehalten.
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Stattreisen München do guided tours about several historical events around Munich. I have been on this one

Vermaledeite böse Weiber

which deals with prosecution of witches in Munich, they talked a lot about the Pappenheimers and the Falkenturm. I recommend this tour - depending on how good your German is.

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