Living in Offenbach

50 posts in this topic

@NomadicCanuck No, not at all. There are lots of middle class people moving in but the hipness hasn't arrived. The basic demographic of Offenbach hasn't changed much in the last few years. It's very mixed but although there are many middle class people and "trendy" people who live here, the "visible" life is very much dominated by low income immigrants of Middle Eastern and south eastern European backgrounds. Public socialization in Offenbach is dominated by the low income migrant demographic and this is reflected in the choice of bars, cafés, restaurants and shops. Shisha bars, depressing bars, döner holes-in-the-wall, euro-shops, low market clothing stores, and discounters are very predominant. The middle and high income demographic just go somewhere else (Frankfurt) to shop, have coffee and eat out.

 

A lot of middle class professionals have moved to Offenbach recently, particularly to the new neighborhood "Hafen-Insel", and some restaurants, cafés and ice cream parlors have opened there to cater for the new residents but these establishments are neither hip nor trendy. I'd rather describe them as "sanitized", "burgeois" or "chainy". These new residents don't seem to go to the city center, which still has a very markedly down-market feel to it. 

 

Generally, I recommend living in Offenbach for most people, but this is also simply a matter of taste. You have to like it "gritty", although the West End is very, very posh (comparable to the West End in Frankfurt), so that'd be suitable for people who like that kind of environment. The Hafen Insel is also posh, but it's characterless, being a 100% new neighborhood. The rest is kind of rought-around-the-edges and some bits far away from public transport (particularly the south) are just plain awful.

 

Regarding the future, I am not sure Offenbach will gentrify. Many people in the Frankfut area think it will, but I am not so convinced. The main barriers in my view are:

 

1. There's a certain stigma associated with living in Offenbach. Many people will make jokes about one living there, because it's "uncool", or just the place where people who can't afford the rent in Frankfurt go to. That prevents many "hip" and "trendy" people from moving here.

 

2. It's so close to Frankfurt that residents who want to go out to a nice place for coffee or a meal can just go to Frankfurt, so there's little incentive for nice bakeries, cafés and restaurants opening in Offenbach. 

 

 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/10/2016, 11:49:38, Smaug said:

@NomadicCanuck No, not at all. There are lots of middle class people moving in but the hipness hasn't arrived. The basic demographic of Offenbach hasn't changed much in the last few years. It's very mixed but although there are many middle class people and "trendy" people who live here, the "visible" life is very much dominated by low income immigrants of Middle Eastern and south eastern European backgrounds. Public socialization in Offenbach is dominated by the low income migrant demographic and this is reflected in the choice of bars, cafés, restaurants and shops. Shisha bars, depressing bars, döner holes-in-the-wall, euro-shops, low market clothing stores, and discounters are very predominant. The middle and high income demographic just go somewhere else (Frankfurt) to shop, have coffee and eat out.

 

A lot of middle class professionals have moved to Offenbach recently, particularly to the new neighborhood "Hafen-Insel", and some restaurants, cafés and ice cream parlors have opened there to cater for the new residents but these establishments are neither hip nor trendy. I'd rather describe them as "sanitized", "burgeois" or "chainy". These new residents don't seem to go to the city center, which still has a very markedly down-market feel to it. 

 

Generally, I recommend living in Offenbach for most people, but this is also simply a matter of taste. You have to like it "gritty", although the West End is very, very posh (comparable to the West End in Frankfurt), so that'd be suitable for people who like that kind of environment. The Hafen Insel is also posh, but it's characterless, being a 100% new neighborhood. The rest is kind of rought-around-the-edges and some bits far away from public transport (particularly the south) are just plain awful.

 

Regarding the future, I am not sure Offenbach will gentrify. Many people in the Frankfut area think it will, but I am not so convinced. The main barriers in my view are:

 

1. There's a certain stigma associated with living in Offenbach. Many people will make jokes about one living there, because it's "uncool", or just the place where people who can't afford the rent in Frankfurt go to. That prevents many "hip" and "trendy" people from moving here.

 

2. It's so close to Frankfurt that residents who want to go out to a nice place for coffee or a meal can just go to Frankfurt, so there's little incentive for nice bakeries, cafés and restaurants opening in Offenbach. 

 

 

 

 

Very interesting topic. Any additional view about Offenbach? I think from 2009 (date of the first post) it has changed a lot. I am considering to buy there a newly built apartment since prices are much lower than Frankfurt (almost half) and in 10 minutes of S-Bahn you are in the city center. I saw that many new real estate projects have been built in the last 2/3 years with nice apartments. In particular the Hafen area is quite pretty although not very charming.

 

For me it is much better than Reidberg, where you pay 6/7000 € per square meter but you are in the middle of nowhere, very far from the city and badly connected with the airport.

Do you think the area will improve further considering that Frankfurt and its neighborhoods are becoming more and more expensive? (so middle class people will move there)

 

Many Thanks

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/10/2016, 11:49:38, Smaug said:

@NomadicCanuck No, not at all. There are lots of middle class people moving in but the hipness hasn't arrived. The basic demographic of Offenbach hasn't changed much in the last few years. It's very mixed but although there are many middle class people and "trendy" people who live here, the "visible" life is very much dominated by low income immigrants of Middle Eastern and south eastern European backgrounds. Public socialization in Offenbach is dominated by the low income migrant demographic and this is reflected in the choice of bars, cafés, restaurants and shops. Shisha bars, depressing bars, döner holes-in-the-wall, euro-shops, low market clothing stores, and discounters are very predominant. The middle and high income demographic just go somewhere else (Frankfurt) to shop, have coffee and eat out.

 

A lot of middle class professionals have moved to Offenbach recently, particularly to the new neighborhood "Hafen-Insel", and some restaurants, cafés and ice cream parlors have opened there to cater for the new residents but these establishments are neither hip nor trendy. I'd rather describe them as "sanitized", "burgeois" or "chainy". These new residents don't seem to go to the city center, which still has a very markedly down-market feel to it. 

 

Generally, I recommend living in Offenbach for most people, but this is also simply a matter of taste. You have to like it "gritty", although the West End is very, very posh (comparable to the West End in Frankfurt), so that'd be suitable for people who like that kind of environment. The Hafen Insel is also posh, but it's characterless, being a 100% new neighborhood. The rest is kind of rought-around-the-edges and some bits far away from public transport (particularly the south) are just plain awful.

 

Regarding the future, I am not sure Offenbach will gentrify. Many people in the Frankfut area think it will, but I am not so convinced. The main barriers in my view are:

 

1. There's a certain stigma associated with living in Offenbach. Many people will make jokes about one living there, because it's "uncool", or just the place where people who can't afford the rent in Frankfurt go to. That prevents many "hip" and "trendy" people from moving here.

 

2. It's so close to Frankfurt that residents who want to go out to a nice place for coffee or a meal can just go to Frankfurt, so there's little incentive for nice bakeries, cafés and restaurants opening in Offenbach. 

 

 

 

Your first paragraph sounds like Leipziger Straße...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys, what can you say about airplane noise in Offenbach? I have been in the city center (Marktplatz and the new Hafen ara) several times and in some cases the noise was louder, in other cases less. Why so? Is it related to the weather? Moreover do you know if people leaving close to the Hafen area are heavily affected by the airplane noise? I believe is more a problem for the summer, since during the winter with the windows closed shouldn’t be an issues. Do you have any first hand experience? Thanks

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buying a House in Offenbach - Need help/advice

 

We're a family with a 1 year old boy currently live in Frankfurt Oberrad.

 

We found a good house in Offenbach Rosenhöhe in a new project, and thinking about buying it. It's located in the 'Neusalzer Straße'.

 

Tried to research online about the area but really found nothing... anyone knows how it is to live there? Is it a good place to raise a family? Safe? Any problems etc...

 

Appreciate it 🙂

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tramch said:

I went to the area and checked it, but the house is still under construction so...

 

I think Luke meant for you to check out the area. I live in Offenbach but I don't know that particular area. 

 

I don't see why there would be any problems there, other than like a lot of Offenbach it's poorly served by public transport. You only have buses going there. No trains, trams or U-Bahn. That's also unlikely to change as the city of Offenbach is notoriously broke and it doesn't have the money to build an underground line to connect the S-Bahn stations in the north to the under-served south.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now