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DELTA vs. LTTC DIP. TESOL for teaching English

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I recently asked my assistant DOS about alternatives to the University of Cambridge DELTA and he recommended that I look at the LTTC DIP. TESOL. Can any TTers offer any insights on how the two compare? Is there a significant qualitative difference between the two? There certainly is a cost difference, with Cambridge awards occasionally reminding me of PADI certifications: Put Another Dollar In ;-)

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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The TESL is the best-known internationally and most expected. I've written this before: you're going to have trouble paying the bills if all you can do is teach English in Germany, even with certificates. You're in competition with young people who are able and willing to live in little 8m² rooms in WGs. And if you're considering teaching English as a way of seeing other parts of the world I strongly urge you to do some intartubes research and read what English-speakers in the Middle East, Korea, China and other countries have suffered through. It ain't pretty.

 

woof.

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Dunno, BD, land a decent gig here (cash, close to home, great clients) and it's a cushy number. I do some, it's pretty good, easy life (to the extent that it's quite easy to just go on doing it if you have good clients close to hand). That's pretty few and far between though, it's the low-paid, commodity stuff that's rubbish. It may just be where I live but it's not so much the "ekeing out a living" brigade that's the competition but more the "don't really need to earn a living and so can dabble in it when I want without pressure so I'll wait for the 25 Eur per UStd and you can have the crumbs" brigade (that'd be me and my mates, and we often come with training / business experience which wide-eyed newbies armed with TEFL "qual" but zero experience can't compete against, but I suppose that means it's *not* all we can do).

 

As to the OP's question, I think it depends on your aims. Do CELTA if it's seriously your career. As to the cash question, you get what you pay for. You'd not want your clients moaning about paying you for being good, so it's not a good idea to moan about your suppliers either. Do another accredited one if you just want to be able to say "oh yes I've got a qual". I've never neen asked if I'm qualified but I did the latter after I'd been teaching for a while (and it was quite useful. not the grammar which I knew, but managing classes and, in particular, how I saw myself as a TEFL teacher).

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Thanks for the advice. That said, I should probably point out that I wasn't asking about an initial TEFL certification (e.g. CELTA), but rather how three specific qualifications for experienced TEFL teachers (Cambridge DELTA, Trinity DipTESOL, LTTC DIP. TESOL) compare. I asked my centre manager today and he said that the only two he would recommend are the DELTA and the Trinity DipTESOL. He'd never heard of the LTTC DIP. TESOL.

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Jeeves_, I might suggest you ask your question on an ESL forum rather than here. I doubt there's many who have the higher qualifications and you won't get as many comparisons as might prove useful.

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Thanks for the suggestion, Showem. I reckon there must be a large number of English trainers in the TT community though, and at least a few with one of the above certifications. Also, I thought this thread might prove useful for other TTers thinking about doing one of these courses. :)

 

This is the response (regarding the LTTC DIP. TESOL.) that I got on an ESL forum about a week and a half ago:

1) I'm not convinced about a London college that can only get its certification through an American University.

2) It's not only cheaper than the DELTA, it's also cheaper than any equivalent post-grad distance study at a UK university (eg the Open Uni). Why?

3) I'd never heard of it before you mentioned it.

4) The "London Teacher Training College" appears to be, despite its name, merely an English school. They have an overwhelmingly long list of courses, but they don't even teach the CELTA or Trinity TESOL.

What I'm saying is that I don't have a lot of confidence in it.

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OK, I can only largely repeat what I said earlier (which is the same as what you seem to have found out).

 

(1) CELTA - the best recognised, top notch one.

 

(2) One of the many "stock" or "commodity" ones - such as the example you cite, which will give you some basics for doing the job and a piece of paper. Cheaper and less effort than (1), not to mention the OU, but not is the same league as CELTA, although perhaps enough if TEFL is a sideline and you want that piece of paper. If you go this route, take an accredited one, ideally an established, well-known one with lots of satisfied customers.

 

Be clear. The example you cite may have a grand title and a crest, but it's just one of many commodity providers of basic TEFL training that get most business of the web. It's nothing special. It's not even a "school". It has "partner schools" (which in UK is actually a "business centre" which'll mean they rent rooms there when they happen to have enough students, so no different from using a hotel, as other many providers do). That is why nobody else has heard of it. It's just the one your colleague happened to pick, probably at random off the internet or because someone else said it was OK. No way would it be licenced to offer CELTA. You can google many, many more similar companies - some good, some awful.

 

(3) Other options - OU, degree of postgrad in language or linguistics or teaching etc.

 

It's simply your choice. No "something for nothing" here. Want the "best", be prepared to pay more in both cash and effort and possibly lost income while studying or in class practice.

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I think the DELTA has a great reputation, but costs a fortune. I've heard that some schools would offer to pay for the DELTA for their DoS, as part of their career progression, but perhaps you need to have been in the school a long time for that, so that they trust you not to take the cert and use it to get a better job elsewhere.

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I've also heard of schools paying for the DELTA, but you usually have to commit to another couple of years with the school or pay the course costs back. (Or else they dole out the cash over a couple of years - same end result.)

 

DELTA is excellent, and so is the Trinity DipTesol. I think the latter may have slightly less name recognition though.

 

Another option may be an MA TESOL if you can find a local university or a good correspondence course. My impression is that the MA has slightly less kudos in a language school environment, and slightly more outside it, but I don't know for sure.

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Been teaching TEFL for nine + years(almost all in Germany..), and can tell you this. What you have for a qualification doesn't mean all that much. FAR more important is what you're like as a person. Your qualification won't mean dick if you're a lame unintersting person who can't engage with your students and help them improve their English - what they or their companies are paying through the nose for..

 

This job is not rocket science. I've seen this phenomenon over the years - people who want to inject more intellectual gravitas or whatever in the job by going off and getting a Masters in TESOL or Linguisitcs or whatever. And trust me, after a few hundred times doing telephoning role-plays with low level unmotivated secretaries, you'll see that a Masters in Linguistics to teach TEFL is kind of like getting a Masters in Electrical Engineering to screw in a lightbulb. "Cambridge" and "Oxford" in the world of TEFL mean about as much as "Wall Street".... :rolleyes:

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FAR more important is what you're like as a person.

 

Absolutely. That trumps qual almost all times here (as does business experience). I doubt it's an "intellectual" thing though, more about confidence. A lot of my German teachers aren't qualified either.

 

The only advantage I see of a qual, here, really is that it heads-off the "are you "qualified"" thing (which, as I said, I've never been asked and could easily say "yes by experience" anyway ie. the confidence thing). That could possibly be advantage if it's a long-term thing (ie. you intend to pitch up in other places looking for work too).

 

I'm not convinced by the "it's expensive" arguments here. This is the real adult world - F2F intensive training with practical experience etc costs money. That's why the on-line commodity ones without most of that are 300 Eur. So your choice.

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Hello, this is my first post here as I'm thinking of moving to Germany in the foreseeable future.

 

I don't really have any vocational skills to offer, although I am educated and have some experience in teaching English. I wonder if you could give me an insider's view of the Engish teaching landscape in Germany (general requirements, how to secure a job, best places to try, etc).

 

Many thanks for your time.

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Been teaching TEFL for nine + years(almost all in Germany..), and can tell you this. What you have for a qualification doesn't mean all that much.

 

This is true, but it's not really what the OP is asking. He's already a teacher: he's investigating the advantages of the DELTA which may be of use for career progression in the school system to DoS or beyond. Or perhaps not.

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I don't really have any vocational skills to offer, although I am educated and have some experience in teaching English. I wonder if you could give me an insider's view of the Engish teaching landscape in Germany (general requirements, how to secure a job, best places to try, etc).

 

 

There are lots of threads on this board here. My advice is always - go where the work is. The need for EL teaching follows that. As mentioned here, the most reliable and better-paid work is generally business training. It's not the "benevolent TEFL teacher doing the locals a favour by pitching up to offer them English" of much of the global TEFL market. As well as HDB's example, its running sales negotiation role-play's with highly-paid executives with decades of experience negotiating massive contracts for some of the world's biggest companies, and the like! Not always easy meat.

 

But don't think "job", think "clients". It's largely a self-employed market here, certainly while bedding in. As also mentioned here, being a personable known quantity and face-to-face tends to beat: "here I am, fresh off the plane, yet another person with no better work option making a remote email application to you".

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