Neosporin/Polysporin in Germany

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Hello folks,

 

How is it called the German equivalent for Neosporin (or alternatively Polysporin)? I can't manage to find those two here where I live (Darmstadt).

 

Also, is it necessary to have a prescription to buy such ointments?

 

Thanks!

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Nebacetin and Neobac are two of the common ones and yes, you need a prescription. Just ask your doc for "Antibiotika-Salbe".

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I had similar question. After reading the posts, I went to a pharmacy expecting to be turned down without a Dr. script. The pharmacist in Deggendorf was very helpful and sold me Tyrosur Gel (Tyrothricin) and said it was an antibiotic. Cost just under 4E.

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On 1/25/2010, 12:39:45, h598g said:

Tyrosur Gel (Tyrothricin) and said it was an antibiotic. Cost just under 4E.

 

 

FYI Tyrothricin (wiki link) is only effective against "gram-positive" bacteria.  Whilst neosporin ((wiki link) is effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative bateria. While I'm no scientist, I, for the first time, realized that they're both antibiotics.  

If you can sterilize the wound (with alcohol, for example), there is not going to be any benefit other than keeping the wound wet while healing.  Still up in the air for that one as to whether it helps you heal faster.  

I'm no hippy, but even on the wiki page (here I'll just quote): 

" In the US, the only large market for Neosporin, the ointment may promote the prevalence of MRSA bacteria,[8] specifically the highly lethal ST8:USA300 strain.[9] Neosporin has been shown to cause contact dermatitis[10] in some cases, and may contribute to antibiotic resistance.[11][12]".   ".  

 

These things might not be harming you, but they might be taking out the weakest in our society, those in hospitals who are more vulnerable.  And while we're at it, yes, MRSA is gram positive.  And as of 2006, 60% of staph infections in hospitals was MRSA (the R is for resistant, folks).  

 

To check off the hypocritical box, I bought some Tyrosur, and tried it out.  In comparison to Neosporin (which I grew up on, btw), it's much more fluid, which I personally don't enjoy.  Neosporin has petroleum jelly, or some such non-evaporating substrate to it.  I like that b/c the wound doesn't dry under the band-aid.  I think in the future though, I'll just ditch them both and get myself some non-antibiotic ointment.  

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On 05/03/2018, 13:28:34, jbabel said:

 

 

FYI Tyrothricin (wiki link) is only effective against "gram-positive" bacteria.  Whilst neosporin ((wiki link) is effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative bateria. While I'm no scientist, I, for the first time, realized that they're both antibiotics.  

If you can sterilize the wound (with alcohol, for example), there is not going to be any benefit other than keeping the wound wet while healing.  Still up in the air for that one as to whether it helps you heal faster.  

I'm no hippy, but even on the wiki page (here I'll just quote): 

" In the US, the only large market for Neosporin, the ointment may promote the prevalence of MRSA bacteria,[8] specifically the highly lethal ST8:USA300 strain.[9] Neosporin has been shown to cause contact dermatitis[10] in some cases, and may contribute to antibiotic resistance.[11][12]".   ".  

 

These things might not be harming you, but they might be taking out the weakest in our society, those in hospitals who are more vulnerable.  And while we're at it, yes, MRSA is gram positive.  And as of 2006, 60% of staph infections in hospitals was MRSA (the R is for resistant, folks).  

 

To check off the hypocritical box, I bought some Tyrosur, and tried it out.  In comparison to Neosporin (which I grew up on, btw), it's much more fluid, which I personally don't enjoy.  Neosporin has petroleum jelly, or some such non-evaporating substrate to it.  I like that b/c the wound doesn't dry under the band-aid.  I think in the future though, I'll just ditch them both and get myself some non-antibiotic ointment.  

Citation needed

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