Abitur after Realschule

55 posts in this topic

We'll be moving to Hannover. It sounds like Gymnasium is the best bet to start with and it looks as if we will have to get Nachhilfe of some sort along the way as my German is good but won't be able to help them at native speaker level.

So those of you with children who made it through Gymnasium, are they half German and did you have to get them tutors for outside school? Thanks everyone.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Gymnasium would be a good choice. It's MUCH easier to move down to a Realschule if things really aren't working out than to move from a Realschule up to a Gymnasium. My kids, 13 and 16, were both born here and are at Gymnasium now. They are finding it difficult especially the 16 yr old whose grade is the first one that will have to complete their schooling in 12 years instead of 13, but we feel that having the Abitur will leave the most doors open to them so we are soldiering on.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a Gesamtschule, either a KGS or a IGS is also an option. Right now they are doing the Abitur in 13 years but there's talk of changing them all over to the 12 yr system in a year or two.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gymnasium (or Gesamtschule, too) is a good choice to start with, especially if your children already have decent German. Why anyone would choose to limit their kids' potential before they've even started is beyond me. Like westvan says, it is very easy to go down a level later if things aren't working out. But going up a level can be really tough and often involves repeating a year to make up for stuff not taught at the lower levels. We've had quite a few discussions on here already about the whole German concept of schooling. Just make sure you get the extra help that your children will likely need, at least for the first year.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

don't think it is about limiting ability - after all not every kid is going to grow up to be a brain surgeon and some may have superlative vocational skills that would be better developed away from Gymnasium. I guess I just take issue with forcing what amouns to a career choice at such a young age. A Gesamtschule should allow any kid to find their right level and most appropriate courses for the careers they eventually choose to pursue.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't be arsed to find the post, but I already wrote about my experience with a family who CHOSE to place their daughter in Hauptschule even though they were told she was borderline and would be allowed to progress into Realschule. I argued vehemently to give the girl a chance in Realschule, but the parents thought it would be too hard. After a few months, they realised it had been a huge mistake and worked very hard to get her into Realschule. She ended up pretty much just wasting a year for nothing. That's what I mean by parents limiting potential - choosing a level that is below your kid's capabilities.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to Gymnasium, the kids who tranfered to our school in the 11th grade had a hard time.

Our Gymnasium was rather conservative /altsprachlich with 6 years of mandatory latin etc.

 

Also don't forget that they transfer at an age, where the others already spent 6 years together.

 

I would consider Gesamtschule, "tier Abitur".

 

Hauptschule is for the mentally challenged, i'm not kidding. It's a thing of the past that it's

for future craftsmen. It replaced Sonderschule. It'S a horrible mistake to put your child there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@BtC

 

Which is exactly what they said about Comprehensive schools in the UK when they decided to try and do away with Grammar schools.

 

Huge sucess that was.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

That's what I mean by parents limiting potential - choosing a level that is below your kid's capabilities.

Its strange that this happens, but it does - know of someone on our neighbourhood who uttered the statement "our daughter isn't going to Realschule - we all went to Hautpschule & thats good enuf for her". Poor kid. My father came from a working class family on the Northernside of Manchester (Oldham), worked through school, graduated at an early age (there was a war on..) and became a University accademic at the forefront (at that time) of Crystalography.

 

Its also true that the other direction happens as well...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

"our daughter isn't going to Realschule - we all went to Hautpschule & thats good enuf for her". Poor kid.

Problem is Hauptschule 25 years ago meant you could learn a trade.

Nowadays the kids aren't even picked to learn a trade, start an Ausbildung, Hauptschule = unemployment.

Plain and simple.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife is Elternsprecher for my daughter's class (11th) at a local Gymnasium - having done same job for previous 3 years for our son's class. She's just set off to attend the Zeugnisskonferenz. I expect she will be back later boiling over with how those pupils who clearly arn't going to make* it still being dragged along rather than being moved to schools more suitable BUT now blocking places for those who would use the chance...

 

*according to our daughter there are plenty in the class who don't pay attention, disrupt etc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

@BtC

 

Which is exactly what they said about Comprehensive schools in the UK when they decided to try and do away with Grammar schools.

 

Huge sucess that was.

they are for the most part successful in Scotland but there, they were just an adaptation of the high school system that had been going for centuries. In England the comprehensives were applied inconsistently, poorly administered, inadequately funded and for some inexplicable reason in many cases without any form of streaming by ability. As I understand it the Gesamtschule are closer to the scots high schools than the english comprehensives.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets hope so as from what I have seen of the German school system they need all the help they can get.

My daughter has more time off due to "teachers conferences/training days/moveable holidays/illness etc etc plus only doing half a day at school anyway that I wonder if she is learning anything at all. :(

 

Not really true that as I have no chance of helping her with her homework anymore - don't even understand the questions never mind how to figure out the answers.

 

Just as an aside how is "streaming by ability" so much different and more acceptable than the German Gymi/real/haupt/ system?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in my school there was streaming by ability for every subject you took as you went up the schol. It was adjusted on a termly basis by the marks you got and as the years had around 400 pupils in each this was relatively simple to administer across most subjects.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Streaming between the different programs maybe. It's a lot easier for the kids to stay in one school and be able to stream between gymnasium and real schule.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My daughter has more time off due to "teachers conferences/training days/moveable holidays/illness etc etc

Same story here.

When I went to school post-10876-1247491797.gif in the North West UK (a Direct Grant school until the sozis forced it subsequently to become private) you could count the number of classes that were missing each year on the thumbs on your left hand...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

in my school there was streaming by ability for every subject you took as you went up the schol. It was adjusted on a termly basis by the marks you got and as the years had around 400 pupils in each this was relatively simple to administer across most subjects.

So you got judged and tested then moved around each term depending on your results?

 

Ok if you are an achiever I suppose but I can see how a lot of kids would want to stay in the class their friends are in.

 

BTW I was edumacated in SCE schools around the world so never had the pleasure of UK schools until my very last year.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

in my school there was streaming by ability for every subject you took as you went up the schol. It was adjusted on a termly basis by the marks you got and as the years had around 400 pupils in each this was relatively simple to administer across most subjects.

Same here but in an English comprehensive. As of Chirstmas in our first year we were streamed for English and Maths (across two Houses - 120 kids split into four sets according to ability). As of the end of the first year we were streamed across the entire year for English and Maths (across all four Houses making 240 kids divided into eight or nine classes), and across half of the year for everything else (Maths and English were the only subjects with enough teachers to timetable eight classes simultaneously). The exceptions were art subjects and PE - where facilities are limited and a wide range of abilities is less likely to disrupt a class anyway.

 

You'd see your form for registration, assembly and for art subjects - but every other class would have a slightly different group of people - although you did tend to see the same faces most of the time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Problem is Hauptschule 25 years ago meant you could learn a trade.

Nowadays the kids aren't even picked to learn a trade, start an Ausbildung, Hauptschule = unemployment.

Plain and simple.

Perhaps it's dependent on the area you live in but I'd certainly say that's not true in our area.

 

I work for a charity that helps Hauptschule kids find Ausbildung places (or transfer to Realschule for the Realschulabschluss).

 

As a rule of thumb I'd say 20-25% sort themselves out and don't need our help, another 20-25% are unintegrated immigrants who need a lot of help and the remainder need varying levels of support to get themselves sorted.

 

Lots of the kids lack positive role models in their lives, some of the stuff that we deal with is quite sad. That said it's an enjoyable project to be involved with. If any of you have some time to spare you might like to get involved.

 

http://www.starthilfe-abv.de/massn_berufsausbildung.htm

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now