Best children's schools in Niedersachsen

17 posts in this topic

Hi

 

I have been following this site for a while and could do with some advice. We are thinking of moving to the fallingbostel area but are concerned about how the children will adapt. Private school at approx 13000. euros each is not an option, bilingual state school would be ideal but I cannot see anything that would be near enough. I think my 8 year old son will adapt, its my 12 year old daughter I worry about, she was bullied for 4 years at primary, has been at high school 1 year and is fine. I have looked at Interhigh school but know that its not an option in Germany. Does the german school system help children by giving extra tuition and help in german? We are coming to visit next month, so would once we have found a propertywe would be able to visit schools. Any advice or experience would be helpful. Thanks

 

Jai mai

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How did you get on? I see there was no answer to your question above.

We are in the same predicament. We have 2 girls aged 11 and 8. Both have been to state school in Italy, speak fluent Italian and English, and I'm well happy about how they've been educated so far.

My husband lost his job here, has found a new job in Braunschweig, and is moving out there on the 3rd of January. We will be waiting here in Italy, until an apartment and schools are sorted.

Does anyone have older kids, and have experience of the state school system in Germany? Like the post above, my 8 year old is young enough to adapt, but it will be different for my 11 year old. Can anyone recommend a gymnasium for her in Braunschweig? Are there entrance exams? Is there help for a child when German will be her third language?

Can anyone help?

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You'll have a very hard time getting her into a Gymnasium if she doesn't speak German and no, the public schools don't generally offer assistance, you'd be expected to arrange tutoring yourself.

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Thank you.

Will ask if my husband's new employers can rewrite an extra 40,000euro a year into his contract for the international schools then, that should go down well!!

Didn't think Germany would be so backward as in not to accept English speaking kids, thought schools were what they prided themselves on?

I'm obviously wrong. Hope there are other replies to this, people with any experience, raising families the same age as my girls. This is not good.

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Well, in Lower Saxony parents are free to choose whichever secondary school form they want for their children regardless of the recommendation the child receives in 4th grade in elementary school, but the question is whether a Gymnasium would accept your child. Some might, you would have to contact all the schools in the area you'd be moving to to see what your chances would be and if they offered some kind of assistance program - many would just not be prepared to deal with a child with no German at all. The Gymnasium is the university-track school form and the children are expected to perform at a high level.

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Thanks again for your replies, we will have our work cut out for us!

Thank you

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Forget Gymnasiums, they're so last century.

 

Try an IGS, Integrierte Gesamtschule, comprehensive school with Abitur track.

Google "IGS Braunschweig".

 

This one seems to be not too bad, rank 31 in a nationwide test:

http://www.igs-ff.de...artikel_id=1243

 

IGSs usually have to turn down a lot of applications so if you are interested be sure to take up residence in the same town or city in order to receive precedence over applications from surrounding areas.

 

Just talked to their secretary: having children with little or no German seems to be an everyday occurrence to them, they would ask the school authority to arrange (crash) courses if needed.

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Just talked to their secretary: having children with little or no German seems to be an everyday occurrence to them, they would ask the school authority to arrange (crash) courses if needed.

 

IGS (or KGS) is indeed a good idea. But again, a child with no German would be put into the Haupt- or Realschulzweig and not the Gymnasialzweig.

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I think it's hard here when you come over with rather older children. NO-one is waiting there to receive them with open arms.They don't get any extra lessons. English friends of mine had a lot of trouble- kids put into the Realschule (OK), or Hauptschule (not OK). A mixed Israeli-German couple also had problems when they came over, as their nerdy, difficult boy was given a recommendation for the Realschule.They put him in the Gymnasium, and he's doing fine.

 

Having said that, it doesn't mean you're that once you're in the Realschule, you'e stuck there for life. You can alway carry on with your education and do the next step up. There are enough examples of the "Hauptschule to professor variety" But it would be worth it to look at all the possibilities before you arrive. Good luck!

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IGS (or KGS) is indeed a good idea. But again, a child with no German would be put into the Haupt- or Realschulzweig and not the Gymnasialzweig.

 

There is no separation prior to grade 10.

http://www.gesamtschule-stade.de/

Navigate to -> Schulprogramm -> Bildungsgänge

 

There aren't any Zweige in an IGS. Zweige are in KGSs. A KGS is more like all schools under one roof which still allows for more cooperation than usual (Hauptschüler attending Realschul courses, Realschüler in Gymnasialzweig. etc)

 

Here is an example of a KGS that has a good reputation in our region:

http://de.wikipedia...ule_Drochtersen

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Ahh, OK. We have a KGS in the next town and they do have the different branches as you say. I thought it was the same at the IGS.

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Ignore the negative advice posted. There is absolutely no reason why a 'non speaking' child cannot attend Gymnasium. We have friends here in the Harz who have 3 boys all over the age of 13 when they sent their kids to school. Difficult at first but they soon cottoned on! Australian, so they hardly spoke proper English anyway ;)

 

Get on with it. It's pointless moving to Germany and not sending the children to a German School.

 

Believe me, you will regret it if you send your sprogs to an 'English' school

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Hee-hee!That's the kind of stuff I love to read! Why do some ex-pats have to be so negative?

You're funny Biker boy!

We've been told to have patience, and obviously when my husband has started work there and mixes with his German colleagues, we will get a better picture of what's going on. I know it will be hard for my eldest, but if she is happy at school, and learns another language out of all of this, I'll be happy!

Thank you so much for the recommendation of the IGS , we will look into that. Thank you also for talking to the secretary, how kind of you!

So uplifting when people actually make it work in a different country. Some people find Italy hard, but we didn't. We will be sad to leave, it's been brilliant, and have made great Italian friends here. We are hoping for something of the same in Germany!

Thank-you for all the above advice and will keep you posted on how we are getting on.

Feel much better now, more hopeful, than I did last night!

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Hello All,

I know this Topic is several years old but I am hoping that current reads can help. We moved from the USA to Germany in Feb. 2015 and my two older children (11 and 12 years) were enrolled in a Gymnasium. After 3 weeks, the headmaster was already expressing her concern which I thought was a bit unfair since we were told that it would take at least 6 months for the Kids to begin speaking and understanding. In any case, the Kids are struggling and after a Meeting with the School yesterday they want us to completely remove the children for the rest of the School year and allow them to Focus completely on German. My Feeling is they do not have experience with non-speaking Geman children and do not want to be bothered with them any longer.  My husband does not agree that we should remove the children. The other Problem we faced is there are not a lot of resources to teach the Kids German. It took us more than a month to find someone who is a retired teacher. There are plenty of language Schools for adults, not children. They have made lots of friends and I hate to move them to another School but it might be the best Option. Any suggestions other than the IGS Brauschweig mentioned above. We cannot afford International schooling for both. We currently live in Wolfenbüttel.

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We moved from the USA to Germany in Feb. 2015 and my two older children (11 and 12 years) were enrolled in a Gymnasium.

Is this a permanent or temporary move? Do you or your husband have a local or international contract? Can you get your or your husband's employer to cover the costs of an international school?

 

After 3 weeks, the headmaster was already expressing her concern which I thought was a bit unfair since we were told that it would take at least 6 months for the Kids to begin speaking and understanding.

​Even 6 months is not sufficient at that age to follow the curriculum in a Gymnasium.

In any case, the Kids are struggling and after a Meeting with the School yesterday they want us to completely remove the children for the rest of the School year and allow them to Focus completely on German. My Feeling is they do not have experience with non-speaking Geman children and do not want to be bothered with them any longer.  

​Many schools don't have the experience, resources, and inclination to accommodate foreign students who don't speak German. Older foreign children who move to Germany without adequate knowledge of German tend to fall through the cracks unless they have parents willing and able to provide them with the resources necessary to succeed. If the current school is not willing to cooperate, you need to find one that will.

The other Problem we faced is there are not a lot of resources to teach the Kids German. It took us more than a month to find someone who is a retired teacher. There are plenty of language Schools for adults, not children.

​The reason you are having difficulty finding German lessons for children, is that all children resident in Germany are required to attend school (and schools are theoretically responsible for also educating the children who can't yet speak German).

I would also highly recommend that you read this thread.

 

 

 

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Thank you for your Feedback. After many more calls today and reading other Posts, I am not only shocked from our Initial thoughts of German Schools but realizing that we as parents will Need to be the key to their success. We believed the education would be much better in Germany than America but had no clue the Kids would not get Support from the School or teachers. This is much different than the US. The lack of communication from the teachers to the parent seems to make sense now. I thought it was strange that no one was reaching out to us.

My Company will not cover the costs of International School. This was the only item in my Long term contract they would not come to Agreement.

We enrolled them in a Gymnasium but now I am thinking it might be better to put them in a Realschule.I also read in another post about Gesamtschule. Any thoughts on that type of School? 

 

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You don't say where in Niedersachsen you are..

In Göttingen there is the IGS ... a Gesamtschule with a quite modern/social approach to teaching. It has a good reputation.

Something like that could well be worth looking into.

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