Germans rarely admit that they're wrong

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And you are German? Are you apologizing to all from all? It must have something to do with your name. ;)

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Funny thing is that I didn't get the correct change this morning in a German store. I noticed, the owner apologized and gave me the correct change.

 

I'm surprised that these things never happen to anyone else in Germany.

Of course they happen, the question is, how often . Germans often only apologize if they've committed a serious fault, and not for little things like slightly treading on your tow, nudging you or giving you the wrong change.

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That was just my experience a quick apology and moving right along.

MAN, do I wish my German in-laws could do that... they can argue (nay, fight) for HOURS over the stupidest shit... no one ever apologizes/ admits they are wrong, and generally somebody literally takes their shovel and leaves the sandbox. Never met a more overly dramatic/ stubborn family in my life, and I've lived with Italians!! :lol:

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I know exactly what kind of conversation you mean. Unfortunately, this is quite normal. Losing an argument to the Germans is like a serious face loss. You have to fight.

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I'm surprised that so many people know so many Germans to generalize about the behavior of the whole tribe. Me thinks there are a lot of windbags on here.

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don't tell anyone but americans are never foreigners either. funny, that.

Its like the term "GLOBAL". I work in a "global" IT company with headquarters in USA. Its often the case that when some change is going to affect everyone it gets communicated "globally" which unfortunately often means "well we included Canada" leaving us Europeans, Australians etc to fall into a black hole when something doesn't work the next day...

 

The other trick is to send out the communication during a US (Californian!) Friday thus dropping the APAC & EMEA people in it on the Monday...

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I'm surprised that so many people know so many Germans to generalize about the behavior of the whole tribe.

What's so surprising about that?

 

One of the most striking things that you notice when you travel abroad is that people are different from what they are in your own country. And these differences are highly interesting. Or not?

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I'm surprised that so many people know so many Germans to generalize about the behavior of the whole tribe.

Uh, when was the last time you actually lived in Germany?

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I'm surprised that so many people know so many Germans to generalize about the behavior of the whole tribe.

Then this might really surprise you but living in Germany everyday you actually meet and interact with...Germans.

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I have a german boyfriend who loses his shit over every small thing too, especially driving.

 

I also had a friend who was given the wrong change buying glühwein and the lady refused to believe that she stole a euro from him.

 

I would say since we all have stories this isn't just a generalization.

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I also had a friend who was given the wrong change buying glühwein and the lady refused to believe that she stole a euro from him.

There is an important "rule" in place when you're underchanged:

 

You have to keep the palm of your hand open with the money visible to the seller, then count your change and make your complaint. Once the money's been out of sight, your complaint may not be accepted any more. (I was tought this as a kid, as it was a serious matter!)

 

I think this is also one of the reasons why many German shops still have the money plate on the counter: You can openly count your change before putting it away. (The other reason, I suppose, is that the shop assistant can put your change on the plate and turn to the next customer, whilst you're still fiddling with your shopping.)

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aahahahahahahahahaha!! love it. don't tell anyone but americans are never foreigners either. funny, that.

True, but not for all the same reasons. The British conquered wherever they could, thus extending the land of "Britain," so that they literally weren't foreigners anymore. Both British and we Americans, though, think our culture/nation is the center of the world.

 

 

In the beginning of my relationship my boyfriend and I had a particularly nasty misunderstanding, at the end of which I apologised and promised to modify my behavior in the future. You should have seen the look on his face. He absolutely did not believe or trust that statement.

That's hilarious!

 

 

I don't know about other places, but I heard it every day in the US. Get overcharged in the store? The clerk says "my bad" and fixes it. Someone hands you the wrong report at work? A quick "I'm sorry, let me find the right one." And the situation is over and done with. There is no long process of "YOU must have asked for the wrong report or YOU some how caused the price to be over charged, it wasn't me...".

 

That was just my experience a quick apology and moving right along.

You just made me happy to be American (a rare occurrence).

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it's like you live at my house. My boyfriend once spent an entire morning fuming and sulking because the coins didn't go in the laundry machine the way he wanted them to, or some other such nonsense. I am currently training him to stop cursing when he spills or cannot find something or the world in general operates on its own without his permission. I'll ask, "why are you freaking out about this tiny little thing?" and he'll tell me it's because things are not going the way he had envisioned them. Wow. He is 29 years old.

My dad, whose heritage was part German, used to freak out about everything. One time I got some paper stuck in the printer and pulled it out, and the printer (his precious toy) started going nuts. Then he started yelling. "It's not that big a deal," I said. His answer: "Yes it is!" He was a heart patient in recovery at the time (it ultimately killed him).

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Do Germans ever admit that they're wrong?

Yes - one did yesterday at my flying club (hes older than me & been in club even longer than I) - came up to me & said he wanted to apologise for violating airspace a few weeks previously, he'd made a mistake in not informing himself of altitude restrictions before take-off etc. Knowing that I'm the club's airspace representative & have to negociate with ATC he realised that his mistake could potentially cause problems...

 

Matter closed.

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I'm not sure that I agree with the statement that Germans never apologise.

 

I work for a German company and deal with German head office quite a bit and whenever a mistake is made by them (and it's rare that they do make mistakes),

they do tend to apologise.

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Now wait a minute, somebody already said apologizing and admitting to being wrong is kinda different. "I'm sorry" is something I hear sometimes too, but "ok ok I was wrong" is not.

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Two years on, re-reading this thread, relationship with said german girlfriend down the sh***er, poor tiny baby stuck in the middle, i have to say that this thread remains relevant.

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I know that this is an old thread, and I already posted my original comment back in 2009. As of today, my original post still holds true. Neither party will admit that they are wrong nor resolve long-standing family disputes. I don't understand why they cannot admit their faults or apologize for any past negative/unproductive actions, give each other a bear hug, then move on to create a solution that benefits all parties involved.

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