German retirement and pensions

66 posts in this topic

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

 

Dear All,

If someone leaves Germany permanently after living there with work permit and paying all the required taxes for 5 years, what paper works does he need to carry out to get the refund of his contribution towards Social Security/Pension?

 

I know that it can only be refunded after 2 yrs of leaving Germany. However I am not sure about the steps to be taken to get that money back.

 

I am sure some of the us have already taken that decision in the past. May be they can provide some tips.

 

Your feedback will be quite helpful for me.

 

Thank you and best regards

Shamsul

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm very confused by all this, even after reading the entire thread.

 

My question is:

 

Am I able to get my pension refund if I have dual citizenship (EU & Australian) but have only ever resided in Australia (I do not have EU residency)? I worked in Germany for 2 yrs but have been home in Australia for 2 years now and would like to make a claim.

 

Can someone please link the necessary form for this please (not talking about form R0851 or V0901). TIA

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Holy cow! A German posting on a forum for English-speakers living in Germany and getting a kick-a*s answer from a lovely Panda bear.

 

nobody can beat our lovely Panda munich!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Am I able to get my pension refund if I have dual citizenship (EU & Australian) but have only ever resided in Australia (I do not have EU residency)? I worked in Germany for 2 yrs

 

I don't understand what you mean by not having "EU residency".

 

From the info you posted, I gather that you lived and worked in Germany for 2 years and hold an EU passport. If this is correct, you can't apply for a pension refund.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't understand what you mean by not having "EU residency".

 

From the info you posted, I gather that you lived and worked in Germany for 2 years and hold an EU passport. If this is correct, you can't apply for a pension refund.

 

I only hold an EU passport because I was born in Europe, not because I reside there (if that makes sense?).

 

Therefore, in order to be eligible for my German pension, I would need to give up my EU Citizenship (Passport)? Is this correct?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Therefore, in order to be eligible for my German pension, I would need to give up my EU Citizenship (Passport)? Is this correct?

 

No. Under the current law you can apply for a German pension when you reach retirement age (assuming that you make a total of 60 months of contributions in Germany and Oz).

 

I'm not sure whether they'd let you claim your contributions back if you gave up your EU citizenship. More importantly, why would you give up your EU citizenship to have a chance to get back your pension contributions?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm now back in the UK having left working in Germany for11 months. I paid pension contributions through the employer for whom I was employed working there. I paid a percentage and they paid a percentage.

 

I have read and re-read this thread and am still not clear……

 

Can I reclaim any/all of my pension contributions as I only paid for 11 months AND I am still in Europe?

 

If I can, am I correct in thinking that I can only start this claim process two years after my leaving Germany?

 

Thank you

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a first question, and then an IF YES, THEN clause, with a second question.

 

So with the first question having "No" as the answer, you don't even reach the second question.

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I haven't seen asked or answered yet is what happens if you live/work in Germany for more than 5 years and want to reclaim your pension? Let's say you work/live in Germany for 6 years. Do you only get 5 years worth back (after the 2 year waiting period)? Can you get anything back at all?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appart from the fact that only people who return to countries outside the EU and/or with which nations Germany does not have any bilateral agreements to this regards (loooooong list!) have a chance to get their share of pension contributions back: once you are over the 60 months threshold, you can't get anything back at all. You'll have a secure claim for a German pension, though, after these 60 months of contribution.

 

Cheerio

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, okay - thank you.

 

So have I effectively 'lost' these monies and never be able to achieve any reimbursement?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will "achieve" your reimbursement at retirement age (currently 67) in the form of a pension.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All,

 

I would like to clarify some questions I have about this 60 months retirement payments to qualify for retirement benefits (after 65 or so)

 

  1. Does this 60 month have to be
  • Consecutive?
  • With only one company?

I have a friend who is under the impression that, you need to have 60 months paid with one employer and consecutively to qualify for retirement.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Aihal said:

Consecutive?

No.

 

26 minutes ago, Aihal said:

With only one company?

No.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follow up question:

I paid a total of 57 months of benefits through my previous (and only) employment in Germany, and then founded my own company.

 

Can I pay voluntarily to retirement and 

  • Complete it to 60 months
  • Keep paying beyond and keep increasing my retirement salaries.

How can one calculate the optimum point or amount of payments to get the most out of my hard earned cash?

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah...

I think it makes sense for me to complete the remainder of my 60 months, since its just 3 more months of payment, so that I can qualify for whatever comes at the end of this long dark tunnel.

 

Has anyone here done "Voluntary" payments and have any idea how the process works, and what amount they paid ? 

  • Whats the minimum you can pay to top up your payment to that mythical 60 month (note that I am at 57th month)
  • What's the application process like?

Thanks,

AI HAL 9000

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Aihal said:

Whats the minimum you can pay to top up your payment to that mythical 60 month (note that I am at 57th month)

 

84.15€ a month, details in here:

However, unless you also have a secondary goal like getting German citizenship or permanent residency (= Niederlassungserlaubnis), I would not pay in anything more and, as soon as I reached pension age, let them reimburse me what I paid in (they never give back what the employer contributed) during these 57 months.

 

Since you still seem unconvinced that it's a bad investment, please peruse the table that @Starshollow posted in here:

5a4d21a1d9952_Screenshot2018-01-03at19.2

 

If you had paid on 60 months the minimum contribution, i.e. 60 * 84.15€ = 5 * 1,009.80€ = 5,049€ in public pension contributions, you will receive a pension of 5 * 4.43€ = 22.15€ a month.

--> it would take 5,049/22.15 = 227.95 months = ca. 19 years just to get back what you already paid in

 

You get your pension starting with age 67 --> until the ripe old age of 86 years you would just be eating up the money you paid in, no return on investment at all during all that time.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now