Wiring up lights in a German apartment

79 posts in this topic

Hi

 

I'm in a similar situation to the previous poster. I have blue (neutral?), brown (live?) and a yellow/green (earth?) wire coming out of the roof. I bought two lights from Ikea, one light has the same wire coding so it's a simple case of connecting the wires like to like. However, the second light just has connections for the blue and brown wires. In this second case, what do I do with the stray yellow/green wire coming down from the roof? Do I just leave it unconnected?

 

Thanks

 

Neil

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Just to add to the help (or confusion!), i've just wired in a light in our bedroom. The connectors hanging out of the dusty ceiling cavity were Red and Black. The light i wanted to attach had Blue, Brown and Green/Yellow wires. After much trial and error (turning off at the fusebox first each time) i struck upon the solution of Brown to Black and Blue to Red, leaving the ground unattached. I hope this helps someone with the same combo someday :)

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Hi there,

I have the same issue with wires hanging out of the ceiling on arrival into my new apartment. I have a question about actual light hanging rather than wiring.By the three wires that are hanging out, there is a small hole going into the ceiling and no other evidence of the previous tenants method of fixing the lights (eg covered holes etc) . I have heard that sometimes in apartments over here you can hook a light fitting to a hook concealed within the ceiling - I dont really know what that means anyway but if anyone can shed any light(!) it would be appreciated.

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The great unspoken: Why are people so cheap that they rip out all the fixtures like bums tearing out copper wiring to sell it for crack?

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I wonder if it avoids liability of the letting agent / owner as if the old fittings were faulty / poorly installed they would be liable. In the UK the owner needs an electrical safety certificate before a new tenant but I am not sure if its the same in Germany. The previous tenants seemed very nice and I bought the main lights in the hall / living room as they were very nice / elaborate - I didnt expect the 1 euro other light fittings in the cupboards to be removed which makes me think the agent did it when repainting the walls!!!

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Maluman - there are standardised hooks with a threaded end that always have a female

counterpart in the ceiling where the wires are. Fittings hang on the hook.

Hooks obtainable in Bauhaus etc. About 3 inches long.

Earlier in this thread there were comments about using neon screwdrivers

to check whether the wires are "live".

Obviously you switch off the contact breakers / remove fuses - but what if something

has gone wrong and one of the wires is still live?

Check using a neon screwdriver.

There are a number of rules when using a neon screwdriver.

Make sure it works! stick one end on a known live contact and your finger on the screwdriver top.

If the neon lights it is of course OK. BUT if you are very, very well insulated (e.g. Thick rubber soles on a very dry

floor covering) it might not light or be very dim. Cure - put your other hand on a wall - it usually brighten up - or become visible.

This phenomenon can occur when you are up a set of steps checking ceiling wires - particularly when there is

bright sunlight. Cure is to put your other hand on the ceiling (well away from the ceiling rose area).

Health warning - never do anything electrical unless you know exactly what you are at!

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Thanks for all the help. All lights wired now - the hard part I found was drilling into the concrete ceilings beneath the plaster even with a hammer drill.

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I just installed a couple of new lamps in our house, I was lazy to go to the cellar and figure out which breaker is the one for that light (there are like 40 switches) and I thought it would be OK just using an insulated screwdriver. I got a kick and it was really hard, I did not fall from the ladder but I threw the lamp to (I don't know why) my left side. Not very clever from my part, I must say. I still feel little cramps when I think about it.

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I wired up some side lamps in our living room when we first moved in. Fortunately our breakers are labelled. I knocked out the light circuit and checked that there was no voltage at the wires. First light done, moved onto the second one and *assumed* that it was also on the light circuit. Was it hell, §$%$%! Lesson learnt ^^,

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Q - What's black and crispy and hangs from the ceiling?

 

A - An expat electrician.

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Hi,

 

Can someone guide me how to connect a light bulb holder to the connections at the roof.

 

I have an IKEA bulb holder with light-blue and light-brown connections,

 

and

 

I have 3 wires sticking out of my roof; may be one of them is black, other green and the third one is yellow,

I am not sure what these colors mean over here.

 

So which wire goes where?

 

Thanks

 

Topics merged by admin

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One black one green and one yellow?

 

Looks like some other cowboy has been up there before you. Or you are colour blind :)

 

Circuit testing (neon) screwdriver required here.

 

Most places have one of the following (if not messed about with by people like me)

OLD...USE...NEW

Black... Neutral... Blue

Red... Live... Brown

Green... Earth... Green and Yellow

 

Of course these colours won't follow down to the light switch. Normally you just get a 2 wire flat cable in just the one colour (usually brown) where the individual copper cores are not colour coded at all.

As others have said - If you are unsure then get a profi in to do it.

 

post-26927-1242029051_thumb.jpg

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So what are the regulations on wiring a German Property the English way?

 

I am sure the lighting will be the same theory both 2way and Three plate.. but are there any regs that say you cant have the Sockets on a ring mains and the lights on their own circuit.

 

In the UK, If you want to work on the lighting circuit, you Switch off the Mains for the Lighting.. but you can leave the Ring main on, so that you can still have a flood lamp illuminated so you can see what you are doing, and viceversa if you want to work on the Sockets..

 

Here, If you switch off the Power to the Lounge, its totally out!

 

Just a thought...

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The German way is to have each individual area of the property on its own circuit.

 

So if you throw the fuse for the hallway you can still get power/light from the kitchen or wherever.

 

As to doing it the UK way - well so long as the house belongs to you and no one finds out then it should be fine - unless the house burns down in which case your insurance might be invalidated.

 

The above advice is worth exactly how much you paid for it BTW :)

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SpiderPig, you may have as many circuits in your house (apartment) as you want.

All lights in one circuit and the sockets of one room or one level in another is ok.

All sockets used by your PC equipment in another circuit could also be a good idea.

Or put your heating in the same circuit as the lamps of your living room.

Should the heating blow the fuse you will immediately notice it and you can react before it gets cold.

Remember, since this year you need a ground fault interrupter for every circuit!

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Thanks..

 

I am a time-served Sparky, But I only qualified in the UK.. Upto and including 17th Edition..

 

I suppose I will need to get a Local Chap to Certificate the installation.

 

The heating and Freezer in the cellar will be connected to an Audible device.

 

As for the Breaker, Will it go the same way as In the UK...? First the ELCB was the best thing ever, then just 3 yrs later it was the RCCd.

 

SP

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SpiderPig, in your case I would go to a local electrician and talk to him about your plans first.

After you found one you can do the wiring and he can check your work and connect everything to mains.

Btw, RCD is now also called RCD in Germany (formerly known as "FI-Schutzschalter")

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