Best subjects to study for getting work in Germany

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So I have been looking at moving over from the UK for a while. Have done it a couple of times but nothing permanent normally due to lack of work , only able to do barwork or something unskillled.

 

I'm thinking of going to University/College to study as I am not having much luck on the work front here in the UK either.

 

What would people say are the best subjects to study with a view to getting a job in Germany at the end of the course.

 

IT maybe?

 

There isn't in particular anything I really want to do workwise I just want to move over to Germany and will do what I need to in order to do that.

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I recommend picking a subject that interests you... So we can't really answer that for you. You will do this job all day long, perhaps for the rest of your life. IT is so 1990s. What else do you like? Maybe think about something that will *always* be around... like a career in the health profession, for example. People will ALWAYS be sick. So... for example, while I really wanted to be a marine biologist, I chose basic research (i.e. somewhat medically related... think cloning). Try to think about what might keep you gainfully employed, even during a recession/ depression. ;) Farming? People will always need to eat.

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I would agree with ML in that you should certainly look at something that interests you. I would also agree that IT is over-supplied in Germany unless you belong to the top 5% high flyers.

 

Having said that, in Germany any sort of engineering degree, particularly electrical engineering or automation, is a pretty safe bet for future employment.

 

Notwithstanding the current problems, there are more engineers going into retirement each year than there are new engineers graduating - and this has been the case since 1993. As a result there are at least 15,000 - 20,000 unfilled engineering positions in Germany. That situation is not going to change significantly in the near future.

 

The company I work for (a Leiharbeiterfirma) is still averaging about 10 new job adverts/day (admittedly down from 50 - 100 a year ago) which I must admit surprised me under the circumstances, but they still have over 1000 projects which they have been awarded, but cannot begin because they cannot find qualified personnel.

 

One point, if you are going to look for work in Germany, go for the Diplom qualification. While the Bachelors/Masters degree is slowly gaining in public awareness in Germany, the fact is that the Diplom is a substantially better qualification (and I say that as a BSc graduate, myself) and it is going to be a few years yet (5?, 10?) before this qualification gets a fair appraisal by potential employers.

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Just don't choose the semiconductors industry. ;) They are actually laying people off, even in Germany. That is why we are going back to California early... My husband is an elec. engineer, and his entire team here was let go.

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Something else to be aware of- age discrimination is more rampant here than in the UK. You didn't mention your age, and the worst of the age discrimination here hits around age 50, but if you are, say, already 35, you may have some additional problems getting into a new career once you graduate at 38 or 40. Maybe others can comment on this if you are anywhere near that old, as that may affect your decision as to what to study.

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One point, if you are going to look for work in Germany, go for the Diplom qualification. While the Bachelors/Masters degree is slowly gaining in public awareness in Germany, the fact is that the Diplom is a substantially better qualification (and I say that as a BSc graduate, myself) and it is going to be a few years yet (5?, 10?) before this qualification gets a fair appraisal by potential employers.

If you are starting completely from the beginning, you can no longer apply for the Diploma track. This past winter term was the absolute final deadline to change over, and our (really conservative) faculty of mechanical engineering did. All of the Erstsemester will now have a BSc/MSc in Mechanical Engineering. My friends who study civil or electrical engineering don't really seem to mind, as the faculties have made the changes ages ago. For us, the degree is only now minimally different, but partially for the reasons RMA mentioned, I still chose to be in the Diploma track. (Also because the Diploma comes with a title before your name :lol: )

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One point, if you are going to look for work in Germany, go for the Diplom qualification. While the Bachelors/Masters degree is slowly gaining in public awareness in Germany, the fact is that the Diplom is a substantially better qualification (and I say that as a BSc graduate, myself) and it is going to be a few years yet (5?, 10?) before this qualification gets a fair appraisal by potential employers.

1 - Most Unis here don't do Diploma qualifications anymore, especially the 'elite' ones eg TU.

2 - There are Diplomas and Diplomas, a good BSc is pretty much equivilent because UK degrees are far more focussed on the subject than German courses.

3 - Most employers haven't taken the Dipl being better than a BSc argument seriously for years in IT since many Informatik Dipl. Engineers come into the workplace with very poor practical skills. I say this on the basis of working here for 10 years.

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A degree in Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering will be a safe bet for Germany for long time...Medical profession is probably a safe bet in the Westertn countries, but German doctors are not that happy with their pay structure, compared to what people in US or UK earn...things like Architecture, Law etc seem to have over-supply in Germany...anyway, you must choose yourself what attracts you...if you dont like it, chances are you will find it difficult to go on...

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Merryeri & Joe, thanks for that information. I knew the Diplom was going to be phased out sometime, but I hadn't realised it already had been! I guess that by the time stu1h graduates the acceptance of BSc / MSc will have improved somewhat.

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Since I am contemplating a similar path as the original poster, and not trying to hijack the thread but add something more to it, what is the general feeling on obtaining a Business degree in Germany?

 

I've been here for 3 weeks, love it, and considering when my year is nearly up applying for a Student Visa to stay longer and finish my degree work. I haven't seen anything mentioned yet about the Business field and am curious what potential such a degree would have here.

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I am 28 years old. I was looking at studying in the UK then moving to germany once I have completed my studies or maybe part way through.

 

I did think about engineering, but in the UK at the moment there a lot of engineers I know unemployed.

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Sorry but just to add to that. Is there options for someone like me to come to germany and study? without speaking the language, only basics.

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Check the DAAD website, though a relative lack of German and being a recent graduate without much relevant work experience would bode very poorly for your professional job prospects.

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If you are seriously going to study with the specific intention of coming to Germany when you're done I would strongly suggest a course which includes a German element (i.e. Business Management and German) - you won't be fluent by te time you finish - but you will have a bit of a head start.

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Hi everyone,

Does this information still hold true in 2017? I have a background in tropical coastal mangement - very irrelevant here and haven't found work despite looking for three years (and I'm edging towards 40 and I'm getting worried hearing how Germans are with age discrimination).

 

Clearly I need to study again, but I am not sure what subject area makes the most sense investing my time and scant financial resources in - and electrical engineering is not my strong point. Someone mentioned SAP but my partner is skeptial and he is in the IT field. Please can someone shed some light in this area and insight would b very welcome. Thanks!

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Preference order:

1. Wirtschaftsinformatik (Business Informatics)

2. Informatik (Pure IT) - specially Cyber security and Data Analytics courses are currently hot.

3. Wirtschaftswissenschaften (Business and Finance) - preferably with Accounting / Finance track, rather than pure Economics

4. Electrical Engineering

 

No 3 - most language intensive. You would need something higher than B2 for getting jobs

No1 - keeps door open for higher number of jobs

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You shouldn't go for a 3-4 year study since you will be basically too old once you graduate. SAP is in demand, e.g. S/4HANA or cloud, but if you have no IT experience, that's no option either at age 40. Perhaps you can do some 1 year course, something you like to do and where you can find a job.

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