Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Laws on leaving a dog indoors while one is away

33 posts in this topic

Hello! I am having trouble finding concrete guidelines on what the laws are in regards to leaving your dog home while one is away. I have heard that they must be walked at least every five hours. I have also read that they cannot be kenneled nor can they be restricted to a room. I worry a bit about my dog running amok while I am away. I am wondering if these are accruate and what other laws I should know about. Also, do 'dog daycare' (not a kennel) centers exist in Germany? Information greatly appreciated!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pay my dog tax to the town I live in and in the weekly town newsletter they will occasionally mention some of the dog rules like curbing your dog etc. So my guess is that you should call the Rathaus where you live and ask.

 

As dog owner, I don't think it is a good idea to crate a dog for more than short while unless the animal is being transported. I have a lady who runs a horse stable who can watch my dog while I am on vacation or on the occasion I need to be away for the whole day. I would suggest putting an advertisement in your local area for a dog sitter or something like that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please let's not get into the dabate on crating and for how long. If there's not a law against it then please leave it out of this topic. People have varying opinions on it and in the past it ends up being a heated discussion that does not need to be had here.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personal opinion of crating has nothing to do with the OPs question on dog law.

 

TT is here for opinion- correct... if relevant to the subject. Your personal opinion has nothing to do with a nat'l, state, or local ordinance/law regarding treatment and care of dogs.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Opinions aside, there are no laws in Germany that state that a dog must be walked at least every five hours. Think about it... it would mean that no dog owner could sleep for longer than 4 hours 50 minutes. I need my 7 hours or I get grumpy. ;)

 

Nor are there any laws against using crates, kennels, cages, or restricting a dog to a room for a number of unspecified hours, assuming the dog has enough space so that we aren't talking about abuse. Normally enough space means that a dog can stand up, turn around, and lie comfortably.

 

There are laws specifying how animals can and cannot be treated in Germany, but leaving a dog alone in an apartment for 6 or 8 hours is not against the law on its own. Whether it is advisable is a different issue which I'm not getting into right now. But as long as your dog isn't barking non-stop and bothering the neighbours then there's no problem. If the dog eats your shoes or tears apart your furniture is also a separate issue that has nothing to do with the law.

 

I've seen TV programs with German doggie daycare centres so I know they exist. A quick search on google came up with several hits, including Gassigehservice München which offers dog walking, day care and holiday care. There are also others so look around.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I offered advice: Call the Rathaus and find someone like I have that has a farm or stables that has space and time to take care of the dog which is in my view better than crating which would be really the only option if the dog stays in and the owner is worried about damage. The OP can chose to evaluate what I do and do the same or keep the dog in the house. The OP did not only ask about laws but also about options for dog day care. Others can offer advice about what they do without censorship. All you did was try to censor a thread you didn't start and wasted some database space. Maybe you should at least donate another 10 euros to Editor Bob for your sins. :ph34r:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the dog laws though, there are three possibilities in Germany. There are national, state and community laws. However, it is doubtful that the community laws have anything in them with keeping dogs in the house as there have already been lawsuits against communities that tried to enact mandatory leash laws to apply to all dog owners and it was determined that laws cannot be made that blanket cover all dogs like that because the necessity for each dog is different. The same would probably apply to keeping a dog in the house during the day as well.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Err... local leash laws, specifying that all dogs should be on leashes in specific areas unless they are trained service dogs, do exist in Germany. You will get charged and fined for walking your dog off-leash in an area where it is forbidden, like children's playgrounds. These areas are usually clearly marked with signs. I believe that parts of the Englischen Garten are also restricted.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

glovid, it would help if you told us your location. Laws vary in different states and a local regulation in Bremen would not apply in Erfurt or Munich. I have never actively heard of any law forbidding a dog owner to leave his pet alone for more than five hours but I should think that common sense would have you looking for a solution in everyone's interest. My tenant arranged for a dog-walker to come around once a day, she herself dropped by at noon to walk her dog so it was exercised and had companionship at least every four to five hours. Other neighbors complained anyway, saying that she was neglecting the dog etc. (aside: One of these neighbors smoked while babysitting her grand-daughter, but whatever ...).

 

Hang a Wanted ad in your local Tengelmann or other, I'm sure that you will find a teenager willing to walk your pooch and pay it some attention for a few Euros per shot.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm... it seems the OP is actually in Trier. So here are some of the dog laws from the Trier city website (in German). I haven't spotted anything unusual or different. These laws mostly deal with dangerous dogs.

 

You mention in your other post that you have 4 small dogs. The most up-to-date dog tax for Trier that I've found indicates that the the dog tax for 4 regular (not dangerous) dogs, regardless of size, is 585 euros in total. Ouch!

 

§5 Steuersatz

(1) Die Steuer beträgt jährlich:

a) 90,00 Euro für den ersten Hund

B) 135,00 Euro für den zweiten Hund

c) 180,00 Euro für jeden weiteren Hund

 

edit:

And here are some general dog laws from Trier, including local leash laws:

 

 

Hier müssen Hunde an der Leine laufen:

Gemäß § 3 Abs. 2 der Gefahrenabwehrverordnung der Stadt Trier sind Hunde auf Fahrbahnen, Parkplätzen, Rad- und Gehwegen und sonstigen dem öffentlichen Verkehr dienenden Plätzen, in Unterführungen, Sportanlagen, Park-, Grün- und Erholungsanlagen sowie auf Friedhöfen angeleint zu führen.

 

Hier dürfen Hunde frei laufen:

Außerhalb der zuvor bezeichneten öffentlichen Wege, Straßen und Plätzen und außerhalb von Sport-, Grün- und Erholungsanlagen dürfen gut erzogene Hunde ohne Leine frei laufen.

Die Flächen, auf denen Hunde frei laufen dürfen, befinden sich in der Regel fern der Wohnbebauung. Es handelt sich dabei um offenes Gelände mitsamt der darin verlaufenden, dem öffentlichen Verkehr nicht gewidmeten, Feld- und anderen Wegen.

So dogs must be leashed when being walked on roads, parking lots, foot paths and bicycle paths, and other public places like playgrounds, parks, cemetaries etc. Places where dogs may run free are usually away from built up areas in open fields away from traffic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure those laws exist but there is precedence to fight it if you get fined. I am not saying you should let your dog off the leash at playground if there is a sign that says you shouldn't. There was a case, I think in Luneberg, where the court said it was not correct to place a total leash law on all dogs in all circumstances. The same would probably apply to keeping your dog in the house even if they made a law against it in a particular community. That's the only point about the leash law, not that there aren't communities with the law or with the law under certain circumstances. Nearly every democracy has laws that fall into this grey zone category that would need to be challenged at higher courts. Of course if you think fighting a 15 euro fine for not having a dog on a leash is worth it...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Err, for anyone who thinks they don't have to follow leash laws, I strongly recommend personal Halfpflichtversicherung (personal liability insurance), Hundehaftpflichtversicherung (dog insurance) and Rechtsschutz (legal insurance). You're gonna need them <_<

 

Your fine could be up to 5000 euros.

 

 

Neue Regelung

 

Seit September 2007 gilt in Trier eine geänderte Fassung der Gefahrenabwehrverordnung. Demnach müssen Hunde innerhalb bebauter Ortslagen, also auf allen öffentlichen Straßen, Gehwegen, Plätzen und Park- und Grünanlagen, angeleint werden. Flächen mit Ausnahmeregelungen gibt es nicht mehr. Stattdessen dürfen Hunde außerhalb von Wohngebieten auf offenem Gelände überall frei laufen, müssen jedoch sofort angeleint werden, sobald sich jemand nähert. Kinderspielplätze, Brunnen und Weiher sind für Hunde grundsätzlich tabu.

 

Verwarnung oder Bußgeld

 

Hundehalter, die mehrfach negativ auffallen, werden verwarnt. „Und wenn das nicht hilft, hilft meist ein Bußgeld“, meint Schmitz. Verstöße können mit bis zu 5000 Euro geahndet werden, allerdings sei ein solch hoher Betrag bisher nicht notwendig geworden. „Viele wissen aber auch einfach nicht, wo sie ihren Hund frei laufen lassen und wo nicht“, so Schmitz. „Wenn alle Hundebesitzer aufgeklärt werden, hätten wir kein großes Problem.“

 

Source: Hundeauslauf in Trier (Article from the Trier City Hall Newsletter from 26.02.2008)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, looks like Trier is serious about controlling dogs. I am glad I have all of the above insurances but I generally follow those rules whether they exist or not. It's just common sense. Too bad Germany isn't as serious about controlling Neo-Nazis as it is about dogs.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Wow, looks like Trier is serious about controlling dogs. I am glad I have all of the above insurances but I generally follow those rules whether they exist or not. It's just common sense. Too bad Germany isn't as serious about controlling Neo-Nazis as it is about dogs.

 

What kind of a random comment is that?

From a neo-con probably. <_<

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

many tierhiems (animal shelters ) will take care of your dog while you are away naturally for a fee. i did this recently and had a very good experience. Cost me 14 euros per day but they did take good care of my dog.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Wow, looks like Trier is serious about controlling dogs.

It's the state, not the city. Baden-Württemberg for example does not allow general leashing rules for areas outside cities except for nature protection zones, which basically come in only-leashed-dogs and no-dogs-allowed flavor, and areas where rabies bait has been laid. Most cities do have general leashing rules, e.g. in Mannheim your dog has to walk on a maximum 2m leash in all built-up aread.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do be careful in how you interpret leash laws. The "Waldgesetz für Baden-Württemberg" specifically mentions dog leashes in § 83 Abs. 2 Nr. 8. I live out in the country where theoretically I can go out in the fields and let my dogs loose (fallow fields, of course.) But... dogs must be under control at all times in B-W.

 

To be under control means dogs must stay close to their owner and come when called no matter what the provocation. Now I happen to have two relatively small terriers with very strong hunting instincts. On seeing a cat or rabbit they will take off running and completely ignore my calls. (Yes, we're working on it, but training away such an instinct isn't quick and easy.) So in essence, they are not under my complete control and I could be charged and found guilty. In some states like Sachsen-Anhalt, Saarland und Brandenburg loose dogs are more likely to get shot and killed than here in B-W where humane capture is usually attempted first.

 

I know very few regular dog owners who have trained their dogs to such a high rate of compliance that they can honestly say that their dogs are always under full control while off leash and will never respond to provocation. And regardless of where or how your dog is provoked, the owner is always held responsible for any harm or injury done by the dog.

 

...

Meanwhile, I still have not found any laws at all regarding how long a dog may be kept alone in a house or apartment. Seems like it is done on a case by case basis, with an investigation usually triggered by neighbours complaining about a dog barking and howling for a longer time. And in such cases it often ends up being a truly horrible story like this one where folks locked their dogs in their garage and went away on holiday.

 

There are, however, quite a number of laws regarding what sort of room or kennel a dog can be kept in. Laws to do with windows and natural light, heating, etc. which have nothing to do with regular apartment or house pets. But you can read them for yourself: Tierschutz-Hundeverordnung

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0