The apostrophe abuse thread

973 posts in this topic

 

And what's up with this, I wonder?

English-speaker's?

It's a deliberate dig at this very thread, FT.

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24.Feb.2009 - 08:46:17

 

Kay... The men's razor fraud exposed

Cheap shaving kit is good as the expensive stuff

 

As copied from the title edit page...

 

I thought it was "Mens" Plural and not "Men's" ??

 

oder?

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Never for for one minute did I think the Grammer Nazi was wrong.. I just couldnt fathom it out...

 

I were totally flummoxed! :rolleyes:

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Alright, so does "couples" in this sentence take an apostrophe?

 

"This perfect couples relaxation can also be enjoyed..."

 

I say yes (couples'). Google says no (only 1 out of 50-odd with an apostrophe). Any opinions?

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I would use the apostrophe. Without it the sentence looks strange (to me at least) and the meaning is not immediately clear. Substitution argues in favour, too: e.g. "This perfect men's relaxation" makes sense only if you use the possessive. On the other hand, I think in both cases it would sound better if you turned it around - "This perfect relaxation for couples/men/ladies..." (if it fits in with the rest of the sentence, obviously).

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OK, thanks for the reassurance. I'm not allowed to make any stylistic improvements unfortunately, but the apostrophe is going in.

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There is an example of 'possibly right/wrong' at the restaurant at Munich's Goetheplatz housed within the Royal Palast Cinema, named "Movie's"... Now I don't know anyone called Movie, but I know what a movie is, but "movies" is plural so surely the plural possessive is movies'? Or am I just being pernickety? But even that does not make sense (now I am confussing myself...). Do multiple movies possess a single restaurant?

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Alright, so does "couples" in this sentence take an apostrophe?

 

"This perfect couples relaxation can also be enjoyed..."

 

I say yes (couples'). Google says no (only 1 out of 50-odd with an apostrophe). Any opinions?

But is it a single couple's relaxation, or multiple couples' relaxation?

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Hmmm... for marketing and advertising, I'd usually stick with saying "couples resort" without the apostrophe. It's meant like an adjective, describing the subject.

 

It is a couple's resort - a couple owns the resort

It is a couples resort - a resort for couples

 

I can see the same principle being used for "couple's relaxation", though it looks a bit funny to me either way. Too bad you can't edit and rewrite.

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STB must be busy with his text so I'll try to answer although I'm only guessing: to me it sounds like a general description (a spa?) so a plural fits in nicely (as suggested above, "relaxation for couples" would be another - better? - way of saying it). If you used a singular the result would be confusing because the adjective "perfect" could be understood to refer to the couple ("This perfect couple's relaxation" = "Relaxation of/for this perfect couple").

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