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How to gracefully exit a T-bar ski lift

37 posts in this topic

 

We're so spoiled in CA with our high speed chair lifts.

I think the guy pictured in post #18 would have preferred something less sophisticated. ;)

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Scogs once spread-eagled himself in app. one meter of snow from a chair lift, the drop was app. 3 meters. He forgot to lean back while bringing down the foot rest/lap bar and the chair was swinging.

 

Worst of all, he had the camera in his anorak pocket :angry:

 

This was at Tulfes where you get about 20 seconds warning before the chair lift exit comes in sight - 3 meters of level surface followed by 5 meters sharp incline. Talk about leap of faith.

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There are still loads of them but they are slowly being replace by chairs (mostly)

I will have to try and avoid them. :lol: I also like the leg break of being on a chair lift.

 

Yeah, the poor guy hanging upside down naked at Vail... I posted that to TT about a week ago. ;)

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The potential for disaster on a chair lift is much higher, but you have to want it, whereas on a drag things happen to you.

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on a drag things happen to you.

Boy, I am really hoping the snow lasts for the night-time skiing this year :lol:

 

(runs off to check if Oberaudorf has t-bars)

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Yeah you hit sheet ice, the cable breaks, someone falls off ahead and slides into you, your sticks get caught between your legs, that kind of unfun.

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...or somebody in an iron-plated helmut crossing the piste forgets there's a t-bar and charges into you

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Quick tip from me. Wave franticly at the controller at the top to slow the lift down.

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Are these common in Europe? I'm a pretty good skier, but I can't recall ever being on one! We're so spoiled in CA with our high speed chair lifts.

Yeah, due to the huge number of ski resorts in central europe, I'd say that they're still very common. I can instantly think of 4 ski resorts where they exclusively have button lifts. But the thing is, these resorts are all small and local ones near our home in Switzerland.

 

The big ski resorts that attract the tourists don't really have many button lifts anymore...

 

My biggest gripe though, is in Laax for example, where NEARLY ALL of the lifts are Gondolas, so on busy days you have to take your skis off and queue for ages...

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I did not get off to a good start with the T-bars (horrible flashbacks of them grabbing my backpack and pinning me against the pole, and getting stuck up my jacket and dragging me to the lift shed). T-bars are still a fact of life in Austria, and sometimes they're impossible to avoid.

 

My tips:

 

1) Try to ride it with someone close in height to you, if possible. If you're 5 feet tall, riding with a 6'4" guy will be awkward for one or both of you.

2) Hold your poles in the outside hand, tucking them under your arm.

3) If you feel that you can't quite get a good hold on the current one, wait for the next. People in line might roll their eyes, but they'll live.

4) It should hit right where your bottom becomes the tops of your legs.

5) Rest your bottom lightly on it - do NOT keep your legs straight! Bend them slightly.

6) Lightly grip the center pole with your inside hand for balance, but don't cling on to it

7) They often stop, and sometimes you will get stuck waiting on a steeper section. Just stay in your current position, perhaps bend your knees a bit more in anticipation of being jerked forward.

8) Wait until you are on the final flat part at the end to exit

9) Push the center bar towards the other person. They should do the same. This will push you both away from it. If riding alone, push it to the unoccupied side and once you're clear of the seat bar, turn your skis to the side and let the bar go.

10) If still holding it, fling it up and forward, turning your skis off to the side.

 

MOST important: Just chill. Be calm. Once I figured that bit out, it all came together for me :)

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and practise doing it to gain confidence BEFORE you take the toddlers up with you!

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7) They often stop, and sometimes you will get stuck waiting on a steeper section. Just stay in your current position, perhaps bend your knees a bit more in anticipation of being jerked forward.

What! Stay still when they stop? You should shuffle backwards on your skis to try to extend the spring or elastic or whatever it is as far as possible. This gives more speed and a good kick when you start going again. Also you should move around in curves trying to get your child to go into the rough snow on the sides.

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Don't they usually ask you if u can take a younger skier up with you? (i.e toddler) Seeing as it is a pain and irresponsible to let a beginner escort one.

 

T-Bars are ok...but i never go near one with a snowboarder.

 

Eventually you will find yourself becoming board and doing the unthinkable thing, in germany, of not staying on the tracks to get a reaction off the person your riding with.

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