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Deutsche Bahn immediate increase in prices by 3.9%

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Well, here it is. After all of last year's strikes, the leadership at the Deutsch Bahn have raised their prices. No big surprise. The guys at the top want to make more money to line their pockets, the guys with the Union don't get the fact that the upper crust won't take the cuts - but that we, the consumer will have to pay more to support their strikes and their "wanted" pay increase.

 

Bad economic times? Inflation? Nope - they're blaming energy costs going up (they've dropped since summer) - instead of being honest and saying "it's due to the strike and the new contract price negotiations from the people who were on strike..."

 

 

Travelling by train in Germany became more expensive again on Sunday, with Deutsche Bahn announcing a 3.9 percent increase in ticket prices. From this week, not only will the tickets themselves be more expensive – the discount cards will cost more too.

 

 

The Welt Online newspaper website calculated that a second class ticket on the ICE from Frankfurt to Munich now costs €89 rather than €85, and from Hamburg to Hannover €40 rather than €39 while the 50 percent reduction Bahn card will cost €225 rather than €220, meanwhile the 25 percent card will cost €57 rather than €55.

More info here from The Local: Deutsche Bahn increases prices on tickets and discount cards

 

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Energy costs have increased; they may be lower than last summer but they are still substantially higher than when the ticket prices were last calculated. The sensible way to travel is to buy the €29 and €39 advance tickets or the €27 group Länder-Tickets, and these prices remain the same.

 

Far worse for me is that they've revamped their website and removed the useful map feature from the timetables.

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Agreed that that is annoying, and that some energy costs have gone up. However, during negotiations, the striking workers kept saying that the pay increases haven't translated to them, but that management kept getting them and lining their pockets, and that the energy increases weren't so much to prevent mgt from getting a larger than expected portion of the profits.

 

Of course, I still don't agree with the 11% that they got (5% maybe but...) I guess the hike in prices was expected somehow.

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Since as long as I can remember DB has always raised its prices in May/June and Dec/Jan.

Usually to coincide with the release of a new schedule. This isn't anything new.

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look DB had to cancel an IPO because of current market conditions. They were dependent on that for finance as state contributions are frozen. It is hardly surprising then that they have had to raise prices now. TBH 3.9% is not a large rise and German rail fares are actually much lower than comparable nations anyway.

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Cars and fuel prices are going down, and public transport prices are going up. Didn't realise you were such a fan of the private car, BTC.

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I'm not. But the OP is trying to paint a very distorted picture of these price rises. DB is a superb company that provides some of the verxy best public transport in Europe.

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TBH 3.9% is not a large rise and German rail fares are actually much lower than comparable nations anyway.

No way, BtC. I agree that a 3.9% hike isn't a big deal, but you can go to nearly every other country in Europe and pay less for rail travel. The only exceptions being Scandinavia and Switzerland. And I would assume Austria as well (don't know).

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This is a problem, but it's the result of government policy – in this case a right-wing government freezing funding for what in most people's minds is a public service. It's also true that car driving has become enormously cheaper over the past 20 years, despite the continued whining of some car drivers. However, you try driving from Munich to Hamburg in five hours for €29.

 

I think that price is only a factor for a certain number of people. The majority make a lifestyle choice between driving and travelling by train. In Britain, where fares are considerably higher than in Germany, rail passenger numbers haven't been higher in half a century. In fact, rail use is becoming so popular that the government's policy is actually to increase fares in order to choke off demand. Increasing capacity might seem the more obvious option, but this one is cheaper.

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No way, BtC. I agree that a 3.9% hike isn't a big deal, but you can go to nearly every other country in Europe and pay less for rail travel. The only exceptions being Scandinavia and Switzerland. And I would assume Austria as well (don't know).

you have presumably never been to the UK then . ...

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Was speaking more of continental Europe. Still, okay, the UK and Scandinavia. Everything else is the same or less.

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They do fre coffee as well.. And your not limited to SZ.. They have 5-6 different papers 2 in English

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yeah but that hardly compensates for having to queu for ages, go through security and then have to sit ina seat big enough only for a stick insect with very short legs if you go by Lufthansa. If its shorthaul I'd always choose DB over LH.

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Ok 3 English papers.. USA Today, Financial Times, and International Herald (I think)

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I don't think anyone chooses a mode of transport based on the availability of dull international newspapers. Although in first class they give you Die Welt for free.

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An ICE is probably the most comfortable way to go, for sure.

 

Perdido, USA Today provided the perfect parody target for The Onion, so for that it deserves some credit.

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Ok 3 English papers.. USA Today, Financial Times, and International Herald (I think)

They usually only have FT Deutschland. i haven't seen the FT itself.

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This is a problem, but it's the result of government policy – in this case a right-wing government freezing funding for what in most people's minds is a public service. It's also true that car driving has become enormously cheaper over the past 20 years, despite the continued whining of some car drivers. However, you try driving from Munich to Hamburg in five hours for €29.

 

I think that price is only a factor for a certain number of people. The majority make a lifestyle choice between driving and travelling by train. In Britain, where fares are considerably higher than in Germany, rail passenger numbers haven't been higher in half a century. In fact, rail use is becoming so popular that the government's policy is actually to increase fares in order to choke off demand. Increasing capacity might seem the more obvious option, but this one is cheaper.

Yeah, the SPD cabinet members in the CDU/SPD coalition include some really notorious right-wing figures, you know, like SPD Finance Minister Per Steinbrück and SPD Transportation Minister Wolfgang Tiefensee. :rolleyes:

 

Next thing you know, Red Oskar Lafontaine will be deemed center-right. :ph34r:

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