Laws on clearing snow and liability

71 posts in this topic

34 minutes ago, Adem137 said:

 

I cannot imagine someone in the UK slipping on the pavement and then immediately thinking to sue the owner of the house...

 

I certainly can.  I have worked with a guy who was in the process of suing the local council because he fell over on the pavement and claimed it was unsafe because it was uneven.

 

On the other hand reports that people suing for slipping on snow and ice in the uk appear to be largely fabricated or overblown, current government advice is that "You can clear snow and ice from pavements yourself. It’s unlikely that you’ll be sued or held responsible if someone is injured on a path or pavement if you’ve cleared it carefully. " from www.gov.uk

 

The difference in germany is that there is a specific legal requirement to clear the area in front of your home and that the krankenkasse like to sue to recover their costs, whereas the NHS as far as I know does not persue people in this way.

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Grump mode activated after a neighbour complained of our gritting method:

 

4 supermarkets near us. FOUR!!!

 

Not one of them sells the legally allowed grit for snow. They all sell the illegal grit that contains corrosive salts. Big 10KG tubs of the stuff.

 

Why don't the supermarkets sell the proper kind? And not in 10KG tubs, but smaller sizes? We only need a few cupfulls to last each winter. 

 

I guess we'll have to drive off to the middle of nowhere tomorrow to see if a baumarkt sells the snow grit without corrosive salts... 

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So, we've got tonnes of snow here in the glorious Eifel at the moment, so I go out in the bl00dy mornings, to shovel away the soft freshly fallen snow from the path to my house, and do the same for the old lady who lives nearby. I do this because I understand it's the law (for me that is, I do it for the elderly neighbour because I'm not always a complete ar$ehole). However, it seems to me that I make the path MORE dangerous to pedestrians. I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete.

Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?

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3 minutes ago, dstanners said:

So, we've got tonnes of snow here in the glorious Eifel at the moment, so I go out in the bl00dy mornings, to shovel away the soft freshly fallen snow from the path to my house, and do the same for the old lady who lives nearby. I do this because I understand it's the law (for me that is, I do it for the elderly neighbour because I'm not always a complete ar$ehole). However, it seems to me that I make the path MORE dangerous to pedestrians. I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete.

Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?

 

After you've cleared the snow, you need to put some salt or grit down so the thin layer of ice melts or has some grip. It's how it's done here.

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So, we've got tonnes of snow here in the glorious Eifel at the moment, so I go out in the bl00dy mornings, to shovel away the soft freshly fallen snow from the path to my house, and do the same for the old lady who lives nearby. I do this because I understand it's the law (for me that is, I do it for the elderly neighbour because I'm not always a complete ar$ehole). However, it seems to me that I make the path MORE dangerous to pedestrians. I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete.

Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?

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25 minutes ago, Tap said:

After you've cleared the snow, you need to put some salt or grit down so the thin layer of ice melts or has some grip. It's how it's done here.

That would make sense, but I've been told (around here at least) that we aren't allowed to put salt down. No idea if it's because we're in a national park, but they definitely don't do it. Haven't checked with grit, but I haven't noticed neighbours using it.

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It's not just here that the natives prefer a thin layer of ice.  When I lived in Canada, there was an old lady who got a fine from the city for leaving a thin layer of snow on the ground after shoveling.  She maintained it was safer.  They maintained she should pay her fine.  She was going to let them take her to court but some good samaritan paid her fine for her.

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29 minutes ago, dstanners said:

I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete.

Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?

Only the first one put his feet on fresh snow. After 20 people have used the path (and it's not -10°C) you will have thick ice. At least my experience.

" cushioning layer of snow" how thick must the layer of snow be until it can be called a "cushioning layer"? I would say 50 cm.

If the layer is only 10cm you would break your bones when falling.

Remove the snow and if you find ice under it, apply some grit.

Salt is only allowed under extreme conditions, since it will end up in ground water.

Some people possibly like salty drinking water, however, that's not my liking.

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My older neighbor lady hates the grit /small stones and told me to use salt. I guess she does not like the clean up in the spring of all those little stones. You just can't please everyone.

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She probably doesn't like tracking them into her house either. I have to pick them out of the bottom of my shoes/boots with a knife.

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13 hours ago, wien4ever said:

I guess she does not like the clean up in the spring of all those little stones.

...and which bin would they even go in!

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