The international school in Seeheim

30 posts in this topic

 

School ready also has social aspects of it. If a kid won't socialise, talk to others or is very immature, they are not school ready. The selection process isn't dodgy at all, what do you think is dodgy about it??

 

I think this comes from the difference of being inside (staff) or outside (parent). I meet parents all the time with complaints of both the pre-school and the SISS - some problems were so big it made the families leave Germany!

 

There is a very confident, erudite boy in my sons class, totally bi-lingual and very mature who was refused by SISS as 'his German is not up to standard'. I have heard him talk to his friends and their parents in German and he seems to converse fluently - although I don't, so may miss something. To me it seems the school is over-subscribed and I (or anyone else) have no idea how they really choose who gets in. Do you (as, I assume, a teacher) have knowledge of the selection process?

 

Saying all this, I love the pre-school staff and they have been amazingly helpful for us - I am just telling the story of the people I speak to.

 

As someone said earlier, many locals see this place as a status symbol for rich Germans to send their children to - and there are plenty of rich folks in Seeheim!

 

Edit to add: Divagirl, this is a Hessen state school not a business. You obviously have no knowledge of it, so why state your opinion?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The school isn't part of the school, so we have no idea what goes on there. As for the selection process, it does vary child to child, as you would expect, but they do require certain levels of German, English and social skills.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...they do require certain levels of German, English and social skills.

 

As I said, this lad has all of those attributes. When an obviously school ready child is refused entry people must think there are other factors at work and can only guess what they are, leading to a very negative view of the entry selection process. While I like the pre-school, we would rather go back to England early than bother attempting to get into SISS such is the amount of negativity I have encountered from parents.

 

Anyone reading this thinking of sending their children there please be aware that most parents are very happy with SISS and only some are not. You must go yourselves and talk to them to see if it might suit your needs. I am in no way trying to put anyone off going there or living in the lovely surrounding towns.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without knowing the child in question or his parents, it's impossible for me to justify why he wasn't accepted. There may have been other factors involved that you are not aware of. I would say 99.9% of our parents are happy with SISS and unfortunately, like any school, we get the occasional bad report from disgruntled parents. We are not infallible sadly!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a look at the Metropolitan. It is wonderful. They are an IB school with a PYP approach, but they are recognized by German schools as well. The children learn to speak and write both German and English perfectly. The teachers are excellent and it is actually located in Frankfurt so you can live in the city and drive there with no problem. We looked at all of the schools and we are very happy with our decision. Otherwise, I would go with the Frankfurt International School.

Good luck!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have applied both our kids 13 and 15 years old, but the school did not answer for more than 2 months.
I emailed and called several times, they say “we will reply this week… next week” etc. Nothing happens.
This is discouraging… :(

Also, we concerned about transportation. If we live in Darmstadt and we cannot drive as we do not have German driver licenses yet, are there any viable options with public transportation, or school bus or something else?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's tram 6 or 7/8 to Seeheim that stops not so far away.  Not especially frequent or fast (every 15 mins, 25-40 mins from centre).   Got packed during school hours last I was using it, a couple of years back.

 

Residing in Darmstadt municipality (city) puts people further down the priority than if in the Darmstadt-Dieburg municipality.  It's their (authorised) gig.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, swimmer said:

I was using it, a couple of years back.

 

Thank you @swimmer. What is you impression about the school? I guess you are from UK, how does it look comparing to UK schools?

 

Also, I noticed that apartment rent in Darmstadt does not seem cheaper than in Frankfurt, but maybe I'm wrong.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know.  I live a life where most of action takes place within a couple of km of our home in the middle :lol:.  The UK resident population here is very low (a few hundred and most probably don't have dependent kids).   It's never been a place where UK families settled and

British workers here tend not to live here.   I think users ended up round Seeheim-Jugendheim itself, or possibly the other south Hesse areas international professionals traditionally settled (e.g. Bensheim).   As I said, it is not our municipality's school.   In addition, this city flies high at the top of most German education rankings, and so many families come here aiming for that, not to then go somewhere else.   The education here is red hot but obviously is in German and also in demand.  (My family can speak English but are not native speakers, so my experience as a UK citizen is untypical, we use the local Europa schools mainly, kids from all over the world go to our local Gymnasium and - yes - we will find the usual middle class stuff like catchment area tricks). 

 

Yes, there is not much rental price difference here as tech cash rolls in.   As in many popular places, availability can be the first problem now before price is even on the table, although we have a decent building programme.   Popular smaller cities - the Schwarmstädte - tend to have fewer "undiscovered" or commodity districts either compared to bigger ones, so range of choice can thus be more limited.    I know "value" districts I could pick in Frankfurt and we also recently did pick one in Berlin, but gentrified small places often tend not to have many (which is exactly why we went to Berlin).    It is, though, otherwise a very very comfortable place to live with lots of things on offer and nothing will ever really go wrong :lol:.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now