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Ratisbon is the English name for Regensburg

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I think Brunswick may be English for Braunschweig.

Indeed it is - I'm engaged to a guy from there. I think of it exclusively by its German name, though, probably because I first took an interest in it after I moved over here.

 

It seems to be that way for a lot of things. If I'd heard of it extensively before moving over, I can't help calling it by its English name (Munich, Cologne). If I only encountered it once I started looking into moving here or once I was here, I think of it exclusively by its German name: Regensburg, Oberpfalz (Upper Palatinate), Weisswurst, Federweisser...

 

The one exception to this pattern is Nuremberg/Nürnberg. I had certainly heard of it, but in a rather negative sense (rallies, laws, trials...) Now that it's the place I go shopping and to the opera, I think of it as Nürnberg, whether I'm speaking German or English.

 

Place where awful things happened in the 30's and awful things were uncovered in the 40's: Nuremberg.

Place with a pretty old town where I do fun things: Nürnberg.

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Place where awful things happened in the 30's and awful things were uncovered in the 40's: Nuremberg.

Place with a pretty old town where I do fun things: Nürnberg.

How about Germany in General?

If you look into local history anywhere in Germany you'll find dark spots near you. Every town had a "Gestapo Keller".

On the street i live and the playground on the corner, people "traitors" were executed when the 8th Army was on the other side of the Rhein. History isn't bound to certain places.

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I think Brunswick may be English for Braunschweig.

 

 

Brunswick is a village and civil parish in the metropolitan borough of Newcastle in Tyne and Wear, England. It is about ten miles north of the city centre, just off the A1.
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I just found out the german for Geneva is Genf... who the hell decided that?? All the other names for the city stick somewhat close to the french Genève, but Genf... sounds like Senf to me.

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@Miwild. It is Brunswick in english. I guess the english Brunswick in some way relates to Braunschweig, too. Braunschweig was part of the Hanse (a medieval trade organisation) and maybe that way the name spread.

 

The German speaking Swiss maybe?

You find it in any multi language country.

Brussels, Brüssel, Bruxelles? Or Luzern (frz./engl. Lucerne, it./rät. Lucerna)

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The German speaking Swiss maybe?

You find it in any multi language country.

Brussels, Brüssel, Bruxelles? Or Luzern (frz./engl. Lucerne, it./rät. Lucerna)

Yeah obviously... but Genf, Geneve doesn't sound anything alike. Valais, Wallis I can understand too, I could even stretch to Biel, Bienne.

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A lot of the older towns in Germany (the ones founded by the Romans) technically have names in English that are derived from the Latin original, or the morphed French version of that. Ever heard of Aix-La-Chapelle? Yes, a name in English for a city in Germany. Or Treves? Both names I guess are archaic, but technically accurate (they are Aachen and Trier).

 

Similarly, if you look at the Romance language names of German cities, you'll find the old Latin names: like Mayence (French) / Maguncia (Spanish) for Mainz, Aquisgran (Spanish) for Aachen (which interestingly is Akwizgran in Polish!!), or yes, Ratisbonne (French) / Ratisbona (Spanish) for Regensburg.

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This is interesting. I'm an English teacher here and the students are always asking for the English names of towns, cities, regions and what not. Sure there are the obvious few and the rest are, I believe, more commonly known with the German spelling and maybe English pronunciation. Try telling that to German students though.

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Batman, you're probably right on that, I think the majority of places will be written the same as in German.

 

Not sure on this one, perhaps Perdido can put me straight on this, but rumor has it that Germany is actually the English for Deutschland...

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's the italian name for it isn't it? I think the whole ratisbon/a name thing is to do with latin, as somebody said earlier. as far as I know, germania was the word describing the german tribes by the romans..

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