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Ratisbon is the English name for Regensburg

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Ratisbon is the English name for Regensburg. Did you know that? I didn't know that.

 

I was quite surprised, when googling the name Regensburg, that it comes up as Ratisbon. I thought it must be some kind of error, until doing some research.

 

Apparently Regensburg is one of the oldest cities in Germany. Over the centuries it has been known by a host of different names. The oldest of which are the stone-age celtic names "Radasbona", "Ratasbona", and "Ratisbona".

 

Other illustrious names such as Quadrata, Germanisheim, Hyatospolis, Ymbripolis, Reginopolis, and Tyberina have also been mentioned in historic literature.

 

During the Roman times, in the first century AD, the settlement was named Castra Regina, Latin for "fortress by the river Regen".

 

So if you didn't know before, now you do.

 

Wikipedia: Regensburg and list of TT members in Regensburg.

 

Maybe there are other English names for German cities that are not so well known.

 

Most people are already familiar with Cologne/Köln, Munich/München, Nuremberg/Nürnberg.

 

Related topic: Google Maps lists Mayence as the name for Mainz

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Ratisbon! Ratisbon!

 

I only found out when friends would send me emails like" I thought you live in regenburg google says you live in ratisbon". I thought I was going to send an email to google to correct until I read into it. So when you type regensburg in google it will automatically call it Ratisbon.

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Having lived there in the pre-Internet days, I was not aware that there was an English name, Ratisbon, however when starting at the University they gave us the full works - Ratisbonne, Castra Regina, Regnespurc (which does not Google, interestingly) and so on, so I recognised it from that. I seem to remember them translating Castra Regina as 'camp on the Regen', rather than 'fortress' a la Wiki, but since none of us was around at the time, I guess it'll pass.

 

At any rate, a nice city to live in. Oh, and Weltenburger Klosterbier :rolleyes:

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My ex comes from Regensburg and when he first met my parents he said he came from "Ratisbona" which of course they had no idea where it was. But they'd heard of Regensburg.

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Kleve near the dutch border is Cleves in English, as in 'Anne of', a wife of Henry VIII (although she is actually from Düsseldorf)

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Maybe there are other English names for German cities that are not so well known.

 

Most people are already familiar with Cologne/Köln, Munich/München, Nuremberg/Nürnberg.

States.: Hesse, Rhineland-Palatinate, Mecklenburg Western Pomerania (compared to "Vorpommern" in German),

Northrhine Westphalia, Saxony, Thuringia, Lower Saxony.

 

Some places in Belgium are named in 3 official languages:

Luik, Lüttich, Liège

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I seem to remember them translating Castra Regina as 'camp on the Regen', rather than 'fortress'

I'm pretty sure Castra is Latin for castle / fortress...

 

When I was a kid growing up in Chester, I learned that any English placename ending with Cester, Caster, Chester etc. came from the Latin castra meaning castle... In fact, my first homework assignment when I moved to England was to look up 3 place names with each of those endings lol.

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Just like Burg and Berg have their meanings. Berg meaning fortress and Burg meaning port or water way. You wished you lived in Ratisbon now eh maurik?

Oberpfalz oberpfalz.

 

On other news.

 

This goes to show you if you bother EB enough he will make endeavors to shut you up. Ha ha

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I'm pretty sure Castra is Latin for castle / fortress...

Castra (Wikipedia) says camp or fort - buildings or plots of land for use as military defensive positions.

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Just like Burg and Berg have their meanings. Berg meaning fortress and Burg meaning port or water way. You wished you lived in Ratisbon now eh maurik?

Oberpfalz oberpfalz.

And mountain.

 

Not only does Ratisbon have you, it now also has an awesome name... Of course I wish I was there!!

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Just like Burg and Berg have their meanings.

Whom are you trying to mislead? :)

 

Berg is mountain and Burg is a building on top of a (usually small) mountain. It always has been and always will be. Same building on a flat piece of land ended up as a Schloss as it did not have the same duty as a Burg, namely to protect its inhabitants from bad people. No more Burgen are built as they can not defend against marauders. Not even bunkers (the modern burg) will do any good. Nowadays a few sacks of sand will have to do.

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Some places in Belgium are named in 3 official languages:

Luik, Lüttich, Liège

which was a royal pain in the arse in the days before navigators

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The Pope's brother lives here.

The Pope used to be Bishop of Regensburg and had his hands on my ex boyfriend's head! :o

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