Active culture yoghurt (and Kefir) in Germany

40 posts in this topic

 

Yes, they say that all those "fancy" yogurts like Activia in the little pots aren't any better than a regular yogurt with live cultures. They all contain the same thing.

 

They seem to have different cultures, and some seem to be developed in the labs and patented. Which one is better, nobody knows.

 

Activia: Bifiduskultur ACTIREGULARIS®

Onken Bighurt: Bighurtkultur

Nestle LC1: Lactobacillus LC1

My.Yo ingredients: Inulin, Oligofructose, Joghurtstarterkultur*, Lactobacillus acidophilus-5® und Bifidobacterium-12®, (*Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus)

 

My.Yo seem to have all the important bacteria, but I don't understand the need for fructose. And, this sentence is strange "My.Yo kann pro Beutel bis zu 4x überimpft werden", meaning you can inoculate yogurt only 4 times. I expected the number would be "indefinite".

 

I always have yogurt in the fridge, I just want to improve the quality now.

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Why do you want to eat something that is still alive?

 

It'll be half boiled wriggling tentacles and legs next... :)

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My yogurt quest continues. Bought the Greek yogurt Total today, it has live cultures and it is strained. But it tastes different than the naturally made and strained yogurt in Turkey, maybe it's because of the extra cream in it.

 

 

Yes, they say that all those "fancy" yogurts like Activia in the little pots aren't any better than a regular yogurt with live cultures. They all contain the same thing.

 

Your sentence makes more sense today. I guess you meant that there is more or less no difference between the yogurts with patented cultures and the ones with generic live cultures.

 

There is a book called "Joghurt Luege", which tells me that I am not exaggerating this stuff. 90% of what is sold on Rewe shelves as yogurt are not yogurt. Milk is somehow processed, made thicker through additives like pectin, starch or gelatin but it is not fermented. Producing yogurt with these additives is much cheaper.

 

I also looked at Kefir at Rewe, has no Pilzen in it whatsoever, again milk is processed so that it tastes like kefir, but has none of the benefits of kefir. Unverschaemt, it even advertises how healthy Caucus people are thanks to kefir.

 

Neither yogurt nor kefir are patented, but shouldn't it be illegal to name these products on the shelves as such, although obviously they aren't? If I mix water with some edible white powder and add an aroma so that it tastes like milk, would it be legal to call it milk?

 

 

Why do you want to eat something that is still alive?

It'll be half boiled wriggling tentacles and legs next...

 

Supposed to be healthy only when it's alive! :)

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But it tastes different than the naturally made and strained yogurt in Turkey, maybe it's because of the extra cream in it.

Or the sort of milk they use. Might taste different depending on what the cows eat. But yes, the fat content could also make a difference.

 

 

 

 

I guess you meant that there is more or less no difference between the yogurts with patented cultures and the ones with generic live cultures.

Yep. They think up fancy names for the cultures as a marketing gimmick. They're basically all the same thing.

 

 

 

 

Milk is somehow processed, made thicker through additives like pectin, starch or gelatin but it is not fermented. Producing yogurt with these additives is much cheaper.

That's why you need to read the labels carefully. Anything with gelatine added or called "Milcherzeugnis" should set the alarm bells ringing. And the ones that say "wärmebehandelt" are totally dead.

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I am so disappointed in myself and the German dairy industry. How did I not catch all these gimmicks before?

 

Edit: understanding the German language helped I guess. Always stayed away from the gel-like yogurts, but pretty much assumed all the thick yogurt are "natural" with live cultures.

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Their website mentions mild Joghurtkulturen, better than nothing or the additives. Thanks RainyDays.

 

Apparently, National Yogurt Association in the U.S. grants the "Live & Active Culture" seal.

 

 

The seal is a voluntary identification available to all manufacturers of refrigerated yogurt whose products contain at least 100 million cultures per gram at the time of manufacture, and whose frozen yogurt contains at least 10 million cultures per gram at the time of manufacture.

That's what's needed in Germany. The Oeko test is of no use. Their test results have a disclaimer which almost sounds like "we didn't really check for the bacteria".

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piggy-backing on sparkling's post, there are different lactobacillus and bifidus cultures, some of them healthier than others, but I'm not sure which are, or which my body may need more of. My opinion here is that it is probably good to eat a wide variety of yoghurts or jogurts, on a fairly regular basis, so you can introduce variety into your system, and top each of them over time. Thanks to all for pointing out what to look for on German packaging. Probably best to look for those products specifically listing different bacterias.

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If it says "bio" you'll be just fine. There are strict(er) regulations in Germany if a product has the bio label. In the U.S. yogurt is frequently boiled down with live cultures added after the cooking process. It's terrible what's happened in the process of food around the world. Anyways, stick to bio, which is affordable, and you'll be eating well. Same is true for bio oils, they're all cold-pressed. Guten appetit!

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All "bio" means is that the food has been produced without harmful pesticides or herbicides. So for yogurt that would mean that the cows were fed organic feed. It doesn't say anything about whether live cultures are present or whether there are any other additives.

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Exactly. A "bio" yogurt may be made out of bio milk and bio additives (I even saw Johanniswort/St John's root as thickening ingredient), and would still be called bio yogurt. Although it wouldn't be yogurt at all.

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(I even saw Johanniswort/St John's root as thickening ingredient

More likely Johanneskernbrotmehl. That's used in a lot of stuff as a stabilizer.

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Same is true for bio oils, they're all cold-pressed.

 

Sorry, not true. You can get bio oils that are not cold-pressed and cold-pressed oils that are not bio. Again, all bio tells you is that the food, in this case the seeds or fruit, has been produced according to the organic guidelines of the country it comes from.

 

Kleines Öl-ABC

Kaltgepresst – ein Begriff, der für besonders hohe Güte steht?

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More likely Johanneskernbrotmehl. That's used in a lot of stuff as a stabilizer.

 

Yes, that sounds more like it. :)

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Let's see if I can bump this thread.

 

I'm basically looking for natural yogurt, so I can start making my own yogurt at home.

 

For what it's worth, I always make my own yogurt, and have had no problem using any of the Turkish yogurts as a starter. Mostly I've bought Ömür brand, and though I've also used a couple of others, I don't actually remember which brands they were. They were Turkish, though.

 

Even if there are additives in the original (though the packaging on the containers I've seen have not mentioned additives), it certainly has not interfered with it working as a starter.

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Anyone know where I can buy real Kefir (made with actual kefir grains) in Berlin? Not "mild", which apparently doesn't have the same range of cultures/still contains a lot of lactose (which I can't deal with)? I'm wanting to get some good "darmflora" going again after having to take antibiotics for awhile. I've checked pretty much everything in the regular supermarkets, but even when I stopped by a Bio Company all of the kefir there was "mild". I know I could/should probably try to make it myself if I want it to be the real thing, but I really don't want to bother...

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I bought the yogurt culture from My.Yo, but not the container from them. According to the instructions, one needs the My.Yo container for making yogurt.


Have anyone tried using the culture to make yogurt but without the My.Yo yogurt maker container? I usually make yogurt without the yogurt. I just boil a litre of vollmilch (3.5%) and then cool it to 55C and stir in a table spoon of Bulgarische yogurt, set it aside. It sets within 10-12 hours. Not always well set but not always slimy consistency. But with this yogurt culture, I can't do without the yogurt maker, it looks like. 

Any suggestions? Thanks. 

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