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Where to buy Punjabi Juti shoes

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I am invited to an indian wedding and the thing is going beyond my imagination. I will be dressed with indian clothes and I already feel a prince...

The only problems are the shoes: western shoes don't fit with the clothes, while "Juti" or sandals do. I hate sandals, I would rather buy indian shoes, but where? I couldn't find any shop in munich and the turkish ones have something similar but no the real stuff...

 

Many thanks in advance.

 

This is what I am looking for:

 

post-10905-1219652260.jpg

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I know something similar in Düsseldorf, no idea about Munich! (After that classic opening with little or no useful information), if I were you, I'd walk into one of the Indian grocery stores (bigger ones, preferably) and ask them.

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Good idea but...mmm indian grocery store in Munich...I know big chinese, japanese, italian, turkish grocery stores but not indian.

 

Actually I can go to my favourite indian restaurant.

Thanks for the idea.

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Herewith some wisdom from Google. No idea which ones still exist or sell shoes, but the odds are at least one should.

 

Orient Basar

Inhaber: Munawar Malik

Sonnenstraße 25

80331 München

www.indien-basar.de

 

Orient House

Paul Heyse Straße 21 (Rückgebäude)

80336 München

Tel: 089/54404475

 

Ariana GmbH

Senefelderstr. 6-10

80336 München

Tel: 089/592523

 

Bollywood Corner

Herzog-Wilhelm-str. 25 (am Sendlinger Tor)

80331 München

Tel: 089/26011636

 

Asia Markt Bayer Strasse 2 Tel: (089) 55 36 19

 

Asien Bazar Donnersberger Strasse 38 Tel: (089) 13 17 03

 

Haschemi Markt Bayer Strasse 8 Tel: (089) 55 02 87 49

 

Indian Store Schleißheimer Str. 9 Tel: (089) 57004194

 

Kashmir Bazar Schwanthaler Strasse 24 Tel: (089) 54 82 86 31

 

Hong Kong Market Rosenheimer Strasse 30 (in Motorama shopping complex) Tel: (089) 48 06 81 98

 

Punjabi GmbH Birnauerstr. 12 Tel: (089) 32 21 03 19 / 20v

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How embarrassing.

Probably I have to improve my google skills and try less restrictive searches...like "munich shoes juti".

Thanks!

 

P.S.

Are there good "google courses" in munich?

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Definitely.

 

Now a more philosophical question: is there anything I should know about indian weddings or generally speaking about indian culture?

I would like to avoid my usual inter cultural gaffes.

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They are fun, loud and noisy - lots of music playing and people will be chatting during the ceremony, traditionally Indian weddings were a time for people to meet and catch up - none of your "silence" during the ceremony. If it's anything like the ones in the UK, there will be a good hour or more of group photos afterwards, during which time the buffet will also be served. Hope you have fun :)

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I forgot to mention that the wedding is actually in the UK.

spacecadet, for the moment it sounds like a typical italian wedding. Anyway hearing the stories about the set up we are already having a lot of fun, but looking at the groom's face while he's riding the horse will be priceless.

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hehe, my husband wanted to arrive on a horse (for our Indian style wedding) but I politely requested he changed his mind - I had visions of the horse running away in the direction of Bromley, with us all standing at the hotel looking bemused!

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Definitely.

 

Now a more philosophical question: is there anything I should know about indian weddings or generally speaking about indian culture?

I would like to avoid my usual inter cultural gaffes.

Maybe watching the movie "Monsoon Wedding" would be an idea.

 

Update: This page does help to understand the peculiarities of Indian English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_English

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Thanks for the Indian-English dictionary.

I've watched Monsoon Wedding and from what I've heard I am going to have the same experience.

 

I just hope to avoid the usual gaffes...last time I was involved in this kind of social events a Pakistani colleague of mine explained me in a very very kind way that the word "paki" is not appropriate. How should I know?! I though it was a nice and friendly abbreviation!

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I didn't know it was a nickname, I though it was just an abbreviation. I picked it up from a conversation between pakistani and I didn't know that it sounded offensive if used by a western.

Why is the world so complicated?! shakes head at double speed

 

Anyway, "Polentoni" for northern italians is nice and friendly.

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Certainly it's not a requirement that everyone dress Indian, is it?

Absolutely not. I was asked if I wanted indian clothes and of course I said yes.

The bride is providing everything apart from the shoes. I still don't believe it.

 

 

I prefer the lunghi on the right man, but it's not for everyone.

mmm I'm not sure if it is appropriate for an indian wedding, in the UK, in september...

 

I will be more likely dressed like this:

 

post-10905-1219671009.jpg

 

or this

 

post-10905-1219671121.png

 

Well...I hope...

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"Paki" is a sort of UK equivalent of "nigger". You'd hear some British Asians appropriating it as a joke, but overall it's best avoided.

The equivalent of "polentoni"/"terroni" would be words like "ghati" (used by non-Maharashtrians in Bombay to describe Maharashtrians).

But then people can be offended by "terrone" as they can by "ghati", so I'd say steer clear of the jokes entirely unless you're really sure who you're talking to.

On the other hand, since you seem cruisin for a bruisin quite fearless, and since this appears to be a Punjabi wedding, I suggest sardar jokes. But only the really subtle kind.

 

"What do you call a sardar under water?"

"Jalandar Singh."

"What do you call a sardar who can breathe under water?"

"Jalandar Singh Gill."

 

Oh and if it's an Indian wedding in the UK it'll be nothing like Monsoon Wedding. More like the wedding in Bend It Like Beckham.

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The bride is providing everything apart from the shoes.

This means she will dress you like an extra from a documentary about taxi drivers who have switched to a career banging drums in brass bands in Calcutta. You will look like a fool. But perhaps that is what you want. It could be fun. Please post pictures on your return.

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"Paki" is a sort of UK equivalent of "nigger"

Oh my...

Well I am the one who though that the word "Itaker" was a nice german nickname for "italian", recalling the ancient greek roots of this people...

 

What if start every conversation with a disclaimer like "me italian, no speak your language well, i no offend you when i say ghati. vabbuo'? ".

Would it be acceptable?

 

Regarding the style...I'll let you know. For me 400 guests point already in the direction of Monsoon Wedding.

Let's see.

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